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02 Jul 07:01

Coffee Grinders

by Doug
Arnvidr

I live it dangerous.

01 Jul 17:00

Swiss Settlement

by admin

30 Jun 08:12

Kickstarter Still Setting Records Despite Everyone Wanting Everything For Free

by Timothy Geigner
Arnvidr

People have always been willing to pay when they are offered what they want.

When it comes to old notions that are used to stave off the need to embrace new business models in the digital age, nothing is more annoying than the whole "the masses just want everything for free" myth. That belief is snappy, punchy, and as simple to understand as it is completely and demonstrably wrong. But for a certain segment of the population, typically older generations of the kind that pine for the good old days when America was all apple pie and tasteful cartoons, the myth persists. Now, however, the myth is old. Old enough that it's begun to lose its flavor, like a piece of gum that you've been chewing on since Metallica shut down Napster. The new flavor is every digital success story that proves the myth wrong. Kickstarter happens to be my favorite example of this. What's remarkable about Kickstarter is that it's over half a decade old and, despite some still embracing the old myths, it's somehow still setting records in raising money for content producers.

Shenmue 3 isn’t only the fastest game to raise a million dollars on Kickstarter, it’s also the fastest game to raise two million dollars. The project was announced last night at Sony’s E3 press conference. It’s the follow-up the Shenmue 2, which was released fourteen years ago.
Were you to believe the legacy content producers, who insist the public are free-loading internet anarchists hell-bent on ruining everything and everyone, this shouldn't even be possible. The fact that records for raising money are being broken now is perfect in debunking every part of the myth. The money rolls in over a decade after the myth's creation, despite the expectation that every day would see an increase in younger generations just wanting "everything for free." The money rolls in six years into Kickstarter's existence, meaning nobody can claim that all this money is currently pouring in due to the embrace of some new platform, the popularity of which will quickly die away. The money rolls in for a video game, the exact kind of product that those who believe the myth would expect to be the most pirated.

What does this all mean? Kickstarter is on the verge of becoming the establishment now, if it isn't already. It's no longer the upstart experiment. It's firmly entrenched as a success story in the modern digital economy, taking its place alongside iTunes, Steam, and Netflix as snap-rebuttals to the old mythos. The truth is that there are conversations to be had about how to best operate within the digital economy, but those proselytizing the old gods against a greed that doesn't exist are no more useful in that discussion than flat-worlders might be in a conversation about astronomy. The myth is dead, gone the way of Zeus and relegated to a time before the counterexamples had borne fruit. The new question isn't whether content producers can get the public to pay for their goods; it's whether the now-established platforms can scale to keep up with the wider adoption of the platform.

Site performance is back up to speed. We're still monitoring everything. We've never seen anything like this. Thanks for your patience! #E3

— Kickstarter (@kickstarter) June 16, 2015

This was in response to the insane amount of interest and traffic generated by Shenmue 3. People flocking to Kickstarter so fast that the site couldn't keep up. People who others will tell you just want everything for free. The myth is dead. Long live the new business models.

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30 Jun 02:30

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29 Jun 18:35

SCOTUS Denies Google's Request To Appeal Oracle API Case

by samzenpus
Arnvidr

Burn everything.

New submitter Neil_Brown writes: The Supreme Court of the United States has today denied Google's request to appeal against the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit's ruling (PDF) that the structure, sequence and organization of 37 of Oracle's APIs (application program interfaces) was capable of copyright protection. The case is not over, as Google can now seek to argue that, despite the APIs being restricted by copyright, its handling amounts to "fair use". Professor Pamela Samuelson has previously commented (PDF) on the implications if SCOTUS declined to hear the appeal. The Verge reports: "A district court ruled in Google's favor back in 2012, calling the API "a utilitarian and functional set of symbols" that couldn't be tied up by copyrights. Last May, a federal appeals court overturned that ruling by calling the Java API copyrightable. However, the court said that Google could still have lawfully used the APIs under fair use, sending the case back to a lower court to argue the issue. That's where Google will have to go next, now that the Supreme Court has declined to hear the issue over copyright itself.

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29 Jun 19:00

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24 Jun 21:30

Hairless animals





















Hairless animals

29 Jun 13:47

Arnie FTW!

by admin
Arnvidr

Go Arnold!

29 Jun 00:00

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27 Jun 03:49

Photo



27 Jun 05:00

Comic for 2015.06.27

Arnvidr

Ooooh, sick burn for future use!

New Cyanide and Happiness Comic
24 Jun 21:30

micdotcom: Watch: This is painfully accurate — especially what...

25 Jun 07:59

And, Of Course, UK Law Enforcement ALSO Using Cell Tower Spoofers, Refusing To Talk About Them

by Tim Cushing
Arnvidr

Police back home just admitted using these about once a week.

No one seriously believed it was just US law enforcement agencies using repurposed war gear to track cellphone users, did they?

An investigation by the British news channel Sky News claims to have found evidence of fake cellphone towers operating in London and elsewhere that acts similarly to devices known as IMSI catchers, the most famous of which is manufactured under the brand name StingRay.
The results of Sky News' GDMK Cryptophone-enabled cell tower wardriving can be found in this file, which supposedly uncovered more than 20 cell tower imposters in London alone in a three-week period. We've still got the UK beat on nomenclature, though. IMSI catchers are pretty much always referred to as "stingrays" (actually a product name trademarked by manufacturer Harris Corporation). Due to the lack of official acknowledgement or FOA-ed documents, we're stuck with the clunky "ICT hardware," as produced by manufacturer Datong.*

*Time to crowdsource a better British nickname. We honestly can't be using "ICT hardware" in the future when further details inevitably leak out. You'd think the Brits would already have this handled, considering the split development of the language (American/English) has necessitated a need for an English-to-English dictionary at this point.

Here's what officials don't have to say about the Sky News revelations, which follows on the heels of previous investigations by The Guardian and the Times of London. The only thing on record -- outside of the inevitable refusal to confirm or deny -- is this statement, which implies the public's right to know what law enforcement is up to falls far, far behind law enforcement's need to bust bad guys.
“We’re not going to talk about it,” Met official Bernard Hogan-Howe told Sky News when asked for comment. “The only people who benefit [from a comment] are the other side, and I see no reason in giving away that sort of thing."
Of course. And then there's this "reassurance," which only states that whatever the police are doing with these devices, it's certainly not as bad as the worst case scenarios envisioned by the most overactively-imaginative.
“If people imagine that we’ve got the resources to do as much intrusion as they worry about, I would reassure them that’s impossible,” Hogan-Howe added without providing any evidence to support his claim.
But that's OK, because what we do know about IMSI catchers should be scary enough. They force phones to the "dumbest" connection -- 2G -- to better facilitate the interception of calls and texts. They indiscriminately hoover up all call data in the area and can often disrupt normal phone service. Their exisitence is routinely hidden from courts, judges and criminal defendants. And they've been deployed thousands of times by hundreds of law enforcement agencies without a warrant.

These are all reason the public should be made aware of the purchase and use of these devices. But because usage isn't as "intrusive" as Hogan-Howe fails to specify it could be, British citizens are apparently supposed to believe everything is perfectly fine.

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25 Jun 14:05

Happy Birthday To Me

by Gregor

2015-06-25-happy-birthday-to-me

It’s ma birf-day! Well, technically not anymore in New Zealand, but the 25th of June is still going strong in America.

25 Jun 05:50

June, 24th

Arnvidr

Sports again I hear you say? Oh well, we visited Gatorland earlier in the day, being total tourists. Last full day in the US this time.



June, 24th

11 Feb 22:48

Watch Babes In Toyland’s First Concert In 13 Years

by Stereogum
Arnvidr

Yeeeees!

The seminal ’90s grunge affiliates Babes In Toyland played their first show in 13 years last night at a small venue called Pappy & Harriet’s in Palm Springs. The band played for 50 minutes in the tiny bar, which has a maximum capacity of 224 people. Check out Andrea Swensson’s review of the show over at The Current, and watch Babes In Toyland rip through their setlist in order below.

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04 Feb 15:38

Napalm Death Albums From Worst To Best

by Stereogum
Arnvidr

Stereogum keeps surprising with their metal articles.

Napalm Death are one of the most important bands to come out of the UK metal scene, period. Like Black Sabbath and Judas Priest, they hail from Birmingham, one of the ugliest, most crushed-under cities in the country’s post-industrial West Midlands. Though they started out as a hardcore punk duo, they were calling themselves Napalm Death as early as 1982, and gigging and recording demo tapes. It took them until 1986 to get anything like a steady lineup, but they had a solid live reputation nonetheless, which got them signed to fledgling label Earache Records. Their first album, 1987′s Scum, was the third Earache release, following the Accüsed’s The Return Of Martha Splatterhead and a split LP between Heresy and Concrete Sox. In its own way, Scum was a split LP, too; it had two completely different lineups on its two sides, with the only constant being drummer Mick Harris.

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23 Jun 05:00

Comic for 2015.06.23

Arnvidr

Don't (donut?)

New Cyanide and Happiness Comic
23 Jun 04:11

June, 22nd

Arnvidr

Jacksonville



June, 22nd

23 Jun 06:51

Photo



03 Feb 08:33

February, 3rd

Arnvidr

How many times will this tree figure throughout the year I wonder? How will it change? The wonders of my living room window!



February, 3rd

02 Feb 20:00

February, 2nd

Arnvidr

Still stupid sick, and I find myself drinking tea (50% honey I guess).



February, 2nd

31 Jan 15:27

January, 31st

Arnvidr

Legit over-the-top sick this weekend. Just about a year after life got ruined.



January, 31st

10 Mar 20:00

March, 10th

Arnvidr

Yodaffe?



March, 10th

22 Jun 13:23

Relationships Part Two

by tga

earth_moon_2

22 Jun 00:42

June, 21st

Arnvidr

Today I spent many hours with inhumane temperatures. Still had fun though.



June, 21st

14 Jun 18:08

hereafter

Arnvidr

Heeheehee, *hurk*

http://oglaf.com/hereafter/

14 Jun 02:31

Photo



08 Jun 16:00

Sign of the times

by admin

10 Jun 14:49

making the most of summerTumblr — Twitter — Facebook— Buy my...

Arnvidr

Yup



making the most of summer

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