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18 Sep 09:56

letargos: Ana Mendieta Untitled (from the ‘Silueta’ series),...



letargos:

Ana Mendieta

Untitled (from the ‘Silueta’ series), 1973 - 1977

17 Sep 10:17

http://4erep-i-kosti.livejournal.com/4094966.html



16 Sep 02:49

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15 Sep 22:25

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14 Sep 07:18

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01 Sep 12:56

Every reform movement has a lunatic fringe

by turn
Carnibore

via Cooper Griggs

12 Sep 11:05

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11 Sep 14:40

slaughterlord: The Ayam Cemani Chicken is notable for a couple...



slaughterlord:

The Ayam Cemani Chicken is notable for a couple of things. First of all, partially due to its rarity, especially outside of its native Indonesia, one Ayam Cemani will run you about $2,500. Second, it is clearly the chicken of Our Dark Lord and Savior Satan! The birds exhibit the genetic condition “fibromelanosis,” which renders them totally black—we’re talking feathers, skin, organs, bones, the works. Only their blood is red, albeit a very dark shade.



SourcE

11 Sep 00:44

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09 Sep 18:20

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08 Sep 20:49

Procedural Brutalism

by Geoff Manaugh
[Image: Procedural Brutalism by Cedric].

Here are a few GIFs of procedurally generated architecture by a game developer named Cedric, built using Unity. Cedric describes himself as an "indie game dev focused on social AI, emergent narrative and procedural worlds."

[Image: Procedural Croydon by Cedric].

These were pointed out to me by Jim Rossignol, who has both guest-posted and spoken at length here on BLDGBLOG about procedural architecture, and whose own development company, Big Robot, is behind the awesome "British Landscape Generator" whirring away beneath the rolling hills and cliffsides of Sir, You Are Being Hunted.

[Image: Procedural facades by Cedric].

The GIFs here are relatively big, obviously, so it might take a while for them to load, but then you can just sit back and watch the rule-based production of built structures pop, rise, and expand like urban accordions.

Imagine whole game worlds powered by real-time computation at the building level, constantly and parametrically fizzing with architectural forms, barely predictable new Woolworth Buildings and Barbicans sprouting on-demand from the ground whenever needed.
07 Sep 05:44

bullet-proof-idea: Landing By George Christakis

09 Sep 03:39

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08 Sep 12:31

DEVIN TOWNSEND To Host A Ziltoid Musical Show In London Next Year!

Carnibore

And I'm going to be there.

ziltoid

Details are scarce right now, but The PRP reports that Devin Townsend will be hosting a Ziltoid musical on April 13, 2015, at the Royal Albert Hall in London, England! Here's hoping we don't have to wait until around that date to get Z2, the next installment of the Ziltoid series! In the meantime it seems as though Townsend is filming the Ziltoid television show, because the world simply does not have enough Ziltoid in it. Townsend took to Twitter to post the following.

Building Ziltoids ship! Filming for the next week… (Maybe some sneak peeks on Facebook later) he's private though. pic.twitter.com/hMOLqajDd2

— Devin Townsend (@dvntownsend) July 8, 2014

Tickets will be available for the London show "soon," according to Townsend. He also explained why he chose London via Facebook.

"Many you may wonder why all the cool shows go to London? The simple answer is that shows with this sort of production require venues with a high capacity and there's no other city in the world where we can sell out a thing like this. Hopefully in the near future, and with all your help, we can add more countries to the list of Hevy Devy loving nations so we can make more shows of this magnitude possible."

What do you think? Leave a Comment

08 Sep 11:14

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05 Sep 23:27

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06 Sep 17:11

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03 Sep 14:51

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03 Sep 10:21

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02 Sep 19:12

scienceisbeauty: This is a classic `nude calendar´ when you...





















scienceisbeauty:

This is a classic `nude calendar´ when you extract everything which transparent to X-Rays, i.e. all the flesh, and therefore any remaining sensuality.

Via The Mary Sue: “This Exists: X-Ray Pin-up Calendar

31 Aug 23:56

obliviousmuse: I NEED FUCKING FRIENDS TO GREET THIS WAY WITH!

Carnibore

I'd prefer this to a handshake actually...



obliviousmuse:

I NEED FUCKING FRIENDS TO GREET THIS WAY WITH!

27 Aug 18:46

postapocalypticflimflam: This.

Carnibore

via David Pelaez

18 Aug 03:11

Military Cave Logistics

by Geoff Manaugh
[Image: "Humvees are stored inside the Frigaard Cave in central Norway. The cave is one of six caves that are part of the Marine Corps Prepositioning Program-Norway, which supports the equipping of Marine Expeditionary Brigade consisting of 15,000 Marines and with supplies for up to 30 days." U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Marcin Platek].

Norwegian caves are being stuffed full of U.S. military equipment, including armored Humvees, tanks, and cargo containers full of weaponry, all part of a vast and semi-subterranean supply chain maintained to help wage future wars around the world.

The Marines have "stashed weapons and equipment in the Norwegian countryside since the 1980s," War is Boring explains, in sites that include artificially enlarged and fortified caves. It's all about logistics: "With this setup, Marines can fly in and be ready for a fight in no time."

[Image: "Rows of front loaders and 7-ton trucks sit, gassed up and ready to roll in one of the many corridors in the Frigard supply cave located on the Vaernes Garrison near Trondheim, Norway. This is one of seven [see previous caption!] caves that make up the Marine Corps Prepositioning Program-Norway facility. All the caves total more than 900,000 sq. ft. of storage space, full of enough gear to outfit 13,000 Marines for up to 30 days." U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Matt Lyman].

These facilities are commonly described as "supply caves," and they hold warfighting gear in a state of indefinite readiness, "reserved for any time of crisis or war."

Marines can simply fly in, unlock their respective caves, and grab the keys to one of hundreds, if not thousands, of combat-ready vehicles, all "gassed up and ready to roll in one of the many corridors" of this subterranean empire on the edges of American influence.

Among many other points of interest, the Marines identify six such supply caves in the caption of one image and seven caves in the caption of another, as if—assuming this is not just a minor clerical error—the Marines themselves don't even know how many caves they have.

Instead, there's just Norway, some faraway land of underground voids we've stuffed full of combat gear, like emperors stocking our own tombs in advance of some future demise—the actual number of caves be damned, for who will be left counting at the end of the world?

[Image: "Medium Tactical Vehicle Replacements, High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicles and trailers, which belong to Marine Corps Prepositioning Program-Norway are staged in a storage cave at Tromsdal, Norway, Feb. 24, 2014. Marine Corps began storing equipment in several cave sites throughout Norway in the 1980s to counter the Soviets, but the gear is now reserved for any time of crisis or war." U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Sullivan Laramie].

On one level, I'm reminded of Marcus Trimble's old joke that France has been constructing a back-up version of itself in China. It is a frenzied act of "pre-emptive preservation," led by the cultural ministers of that sclerotic nation of well-tended chateaux who realized that la belle France could only survive if they built immediately ready copies of themselves elsewhere.

Only, in France's case, it wasn't willful self-burial in Norwegian caves, but in the real estate free-for-all of urban China. After all, Trimble suggested, that country's "construction industry seems perfect for the task of backing up bricks rather than bits—cheap and powered by the brute force of sheer population. Copies of places may be made in a fraction of the time that it took to create them. If, in the event of a catastrophic episode, the part of France in question could be restored and life would go on as it was before."

[Image: "China: ample space for a spare copy of France"; image by Marcus Trimble].

Militarize this, secret it away in a cave in Scandinavia, and you have something roughly approximately what's called the Marine Corps Prepositioning Program.

However, I was also reminded of a recent paper by Pierre Belanger and Alexander Scott Arroyo at Harvard's GSD. There, Belanger and Arroyo describe the U.S. military as a kind of planetary logistics challenge. (A PDF of their paper is available here courtesy of the U.S. Department of Defense).

Specifically, it is the problem of building and often violently maintaining "logistics islands," as Belanger and Arroyo describe them, that now characterizes much of the U.S. military's global behavior, an endless quest for finding and protecting "a secure staging ground adjacent to the theater of operations," in an era when adjacency is increasingly hard to define. As they explain:
While logistical acquisitions are managed by the Defense Logistics Agency (DLA), logistical operations in the field are predominantly coordinated by USTRANSCOM. On average, the command oversees almost 2,000 air missions and 10,000 ground shipments per week, with 25 container ships providing active logistical support. From October 2009 through September 2010 alone, USTRANSCOM flew 37,304 airlift missions carrying over 2 million passengers and 852,141 tons of cargo; aerially refueled 13,504 aircraft with 338,856,200 pounds of fuel on 11,859 distinct sorties; and moved nearly 25 million tons of cargo in coordinated sea-land operations. DLA and USTRANSCOM and their civilian partners are responsible for the largest, most widespread, and most diverse sustained logistics operation in history.
The largest, most widespread, and most diverse sustained logistics operation in history.

The obvious and intended resonance here is that military operations perhaps now most closely resemble complicated UPS deliveries than anything like actual ground combat. However, we can also infer from this that establishing new and ever more convenient logistics islands is vital to U.S. national security.

A literal archipelago of shipping hubs is thus key to the country's global military activities, and this not only requires sites like Diego Garcia, which Belanger and Arroyo specifically write about, or even the "mobile offshore bases" they also describe, where the pop-up urbanism of Archigram has been inadvertently realized by the U.S. military, but artificially fortified caves near the Arctic Circle where truly daunting amounts of military materiel are now kept on hand, as if held frozen in some imperial freezer, awaiting the day when global tensions truly heat up.

Read a bit more at War is Boring.

(This is more or less irrelevant, but you might also like Kiln, earlier on BLDGBLOG).
16 Aug 09:31

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Carnibore

Slayer.



27 Aug 11:49

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