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02 Feb 08:58

Freedive with Katharine Kollman and the Analogue Aqua Simple Use Camera

by eloffreno

Freediver and photographer Katharine Kollman is back to put the Analogue Aqua Simple Use Reloadable Camera and our films to an underwater test!

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01 Feb 10:52

Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal - Kettling

by tech@thehiveworks.com


Click here to go see the bonus panel!

Hovertext:
I honestly don't understand why birders are all so happy. It's like constantly rubbing your face in human limitations, and then you don't even get to shoot the source of your suffering.


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26 Jan 09:08

Delicate Knots, Velvet, and Beads Entwine in Julia Shore’s Mossy Embroideries

by Kate Mothes
Embroideries made to look like moss that also incorporates real moss, surrounded by beads and thread.

All images © Julia Shore, shared with permission

Dappled with French knots, glinting materials, and pieces of moss, botanical embroideries by Julia Shore replicate the forest floor’s supple textures in fiber and beads. The Los Angeles-based artist also uses hand-dyed velvet, wool, felt, and sequins to add a variety of hues ranging from emerald green to golden yellow. “I tried to capture its intricacy—all the different shades and forms of moss; its soft and calming nature,” she says.

Shore’s next series of moss pieces will be released on Etsy in February. She shares embroidery tutorials on YouTube and has kits and downloadable patterns available for purchase on her website. You can also follow more updates on Instagram.

 

An embroidery made to look like moss that also incorporates real moss. Pictured held in someone's hand surrounded by beads and thread.

An embroidery made to look like moss that also incorporates real moss, pictured surrounded by natural moss.

An embroidery made to look like moss that also incorporates real moss, pictured surrounded by beads and thread.

An embroidery made to look like moss that also incorporates real moss, pictured surrounded by natural moss.

A photo of a moss-like embroidery

A photo of a multiple moss-like embroideries

An embroidery made to look like moss that also incorporates real moss, pictured surrounded by natural moss.

Do stories and artists like this matter to you? Become a Colossal Member today and support independent arts publishing for as little as $5 per month. The article Delicate Knots, Velvet, and Beads Entwine in Julia Shore’s Mossy Embroideries appeared first on Colossal.

06 Jan 10:19

Hapless Hangups and Silly Spoofs Abound in the 2022 Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards

by Kate Mothes
A photograph of an animal with a bird behind it so that it appears as though it has wings.

Highly Commended Winner, “Pegasus, the flying horse” © Jagdeep Rajput and Comedy Wildlife 2022

Since its inception in 2015, submissions to the Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards (previously) have captured some of nature’s most hapless and humorous moments. In this year’s contest, the overall winner was Jennifer Hadley’s timely snap of a 3-month old lion cub tumbling down a tree, taken in the Serengeti, Tanzania. Hadley shared that she and her travel companions had been watching the cub in the tree for some time. “It didn’t even occur to me that he would make a go of getting down by himself in the most un-cat like fashion. I mean, how often do cats fall out of trees?” she says.

In this year’s juried contest, 5,000 entries from 85 countries amounted to fierce competition, showcasing “seriously funny” images in an effort to highlight the diversity of the world’s wildlife and raise awareness of the need for conservation. In partnership with the Whitley Fund for Nature, the contest contributes 10% of revenue toward conservation efforts in countries across the Global South.

See a gallery of all winning images on the competition website, and if you would like to enter your own images for consideration in the 2023 contest, applications are now open.

 

A photograph of a lion cub falling out of a tree.

Overall Winner and Serian & Alex Walker’s Creatures of the Land Award, “Not so cat-like reflexes” © Jennifer Hadley and Comedy Wildlife 2022

Two penguins on a shoreline. One appears to be telling the other one to "talk to the hand."

Affinity Photo 2 People’s Choice Award, “Talk to the Fin” Image © Jennifer Hadley and Comedy Wildlife 2022

Left: Two kangaroos at sunset on a beach appear as if one is swinging the other one around by its feet. Right: Two meerkats play together; one appears to strangle the other.

Highly Commended Winners. Left: “It’s all kicking off!” © Michael Eastway and Comedy Wildlife 2022. Right: “I’m gonna strangle you” © Emmanuel Do Linh San and Comedy Wildlife 2022

A photograph of two penguins standing side-by-side, one without a head.

Highly Commended Winner, “Keep calm and keep your head” © Martin Grace and Comedy Wildlife 2022

Two fish get up close and personal to the camera lens.

Creatures Under the Water Award, “Say Cheeeeeeese” © Arturo Telle and Comedy Wildlife 2022

A photograph of a heron and a hippo. The hippo has its mouth open wide and looks like it will eat the heron whole.

Spectrum Photo Creatures of the Air Award, “Hippo and Heron” © Jean Jacques Alcalay and Comedy Wildlife 2022

A photograph of a small owl winking from inside a pipe.

Junior Award, “ICU” © Arshdeep Singh and Comedy Wildlife 2022

A photograph of a raccoon in a snowy landscape that looks like it is waving to the viewer.

Highly Commended Winner, “Hello everyone” © Miroslav Srb and Comedy Wildlife 2022

Do stories and artists like this matter to you? Become a Colossal Member today and support independent arts publishing for as little as $5 per month. The article Hapless Hangups and Silly Spoofs Abound in the 2022 Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards appeared first on Colossal.

03 Jan 11:23

Scenes of Return

Scenes of Return

Scenes of Return

What makes some photographers return to the same places over and over again? Building their projects around a specific location, this collection of artists share a devotion to observing the rhymes and rhythms of a particular place.

What makes some photographers return to the same places over and over again? Every artist has recurring themes, of course, but for a specific location or scene to imprint itself upon a person’s consciousness, a particular kind of symbiosis must have occurred. The place had to have had an effect on the artist, whether that be visually, emotionally, atmospherically, or something else entirely. What compelled Joel Sternfeld to walk the High Line endlessly in search of pictures? Why did Carrie Mae Weems set up her camera in front of her kitchen table repeatedly across the years? And what made Ed Ruscha methodically photograph every building on the same street?

Photography as a medium has long been associated with the idea of repetition, though perhaps more so for its mechanical aspect—as in, its technically infinite reproducibility—than for any conceptual usage of it. Habit and ritual are huge shaping forces when it comes to artistic process though and many photographers, past and present, have revealed themselves to be creatures of habit, unable to draw themselves away from a particular subject or two, no matter where else their career leads. Looking to the present, the seven contemporary artists this essay centres around all have a place they return to with their cameras, and together they weave a rich web of reasons why.

時代/Jidai - III. Shinjuku Station, spring 2017 © Juan Carlos Pinto

For Mexico-born, Japan-based photographer Juan Carlos Pinto, that spot takes the form of a small bank of aesthetically pleasing green phone boxes in the basement of Tokyo’s Shinjuku Station—a spot he first came across on a rainy spring afternoon in 2016. “I was on my way to work when I saw the image: it was the first time I saw someone using those phones. I used to pass by that place about three or four times a week, but I had never noticed them before. Suddenly, seeing that person’s wet coat and his hand holding the handset brought the place to life. Without thinking much about the composition I took the photograph and went on my way.” Pinto printed up that photograph as a single image and called it 時代/Jidai - I (which translates to ‘era’). A year or so passed before he thought about it again.

時代/Jidai - IX. Shinjuku Station, spring 2018 © Juan Carlos Pinto

“At first I returned to photograph there because of the appearance of the place,” he recalls. “But over time, the place took on new meanings for me, as each photo I added to the collection seemed to be a chapter of an epistolary conversation in which the social fabric of Tokyo revealed itself.” He started to visit the spot more and more, and some days he would spend up to four hours waiting for someone to use the space.

“Once I find a place where I see aesthetic possibilities I usually explore it for weeks and even months until I manage to take the photograph I am looking for,” he says. With this type of work, the question of when a project like this should finish—if ever—also arises. For Pinto, that time won’t be until the phones disappear. “Perhaps that is the image that will close this series: two empty aluminium pedestals,” he muses. In a way, then, these images of people using the phones form a little time capsule, because most of us now use cell phones and sooner or later public phones may become extinct.

From the series “TTP,” 2012-2016 © Tomiyasu Hayahisa

Other photographers are drawn to documenting how a specific place is used in a variety of ways by a variety of people. Two photographers that explore this theme are Tomiyasu Hayahisa, who repeatedly photographed a pingpong table in a public park in his Berlin neighborhood, and Ellen Mitchell, who photographs the benches on the boardwalk of Seaside Heights in New Jersey over and again. Hayahisa’s pictures are always framed the same way—from the vantage point of his apartment window.

“One day, in 2012, I was watching people coming to the table and I thought they were going to play table tennis, but they didn’t. They didn’t play anything—they just sat there and left after a while. From that moment on, I started photographing the people at the table,” he says. And indeed the people in his pictures are seen using the table to lie on, to sit and chat, to skate and so on. Hayahisa has long been interested in a fixed-point-observation style of photographing, he says, which he believes is a way of truly seeing objects and scenes and perceiving their potential.

From the series “TTP,” 2012-2016 © Tomiyasu Hayahisa

Mitchell, meanwhile, began her series in 2014, compelled to document this place she’d spent so much time at while growing up. “When I started to shoot at Seaside, I didn’t have an idea of the kind of pictures I wanted to make, but I did know what interested me about the place—the diverse crowds, the architecture, the dichotomy between a very economically depressed populace (it’s consistently one of the poorest towns in the state) and a vibrant beach resort,” she explains.

Untitled. July 5, 2019 © Ellen Mitchell

“I think that, as a local, I can pick out a lot of small details that show what is interesting about the town, but at the same time, I probably miss a lot because I’m so used to seeing it that I’ve become blind to it, in a way.” Some of the impulse behind this act of repetitive photographing is about refreshing her vision anew, then, as well as looking at the characters who use the same spaces as her. “With a uniform format there is a heightened awareness of how the people in each frame differ—in age, gender, race, the endless variety of appearances and behaviours—all of the things that make us fascinating as humans. I think having a similar layout, with the constant of the bench, brings out the beauty and uniqueness of the subjects even more,” she says.

Untitled. August 15, 2021 © Ellen Mitchell

Like Mitchell, San Francisco-based photographer Jake Ricker also became enthralled by a particular public place: this time, the iconic Golden Gate Bridge. Starting in 2017, he began going to the bridge almost every day, staying all day and looking for images. “I thought that the candid, street style of photography that I shoot would be an interesting way to show a different version of such a photographed place,” he says. The resulting pictures capture a spectrum of experience, from tourists’ days out to family embraces, car crashes and cops patrolling.

From the series “Strange Paradise” © Jake Ricker

And then there are the moments not seen too—the 60-odd attempted suicides he helped to prevent simply by being there, watching behaviors and lending an ear. In this way, the ritual of heading back to the same place day after day transcended photography, quickly becoming the work he lived his life around. Ricker says he knows there must be an end to the project eventually, so he is planning on wrapping it up when the suicide-detterent nets that are being installed are finished, which feels like a “natural end” for what the project has become.

From the series “Strange Paradise” © Jake Ricker

Where some photographers head out into the world to find their recurring subjects, others look inwards, unearthing something they keep feeling pulled back to from the substance of their daily lives. Back in 2008, the artist Daniel Blaufuks had been spending an extended amount of time at home due to personal reasons, and there was a certain period where he barely went out at all. During that time, he read and studied a lot—books including Cesare Pavese’s diary and the writings of Georges Perec—and slowly, he started to become inspired by both his own reclusion, and the details of his private space.

From the series “Attempting Exhaustion” © Daniel Blaufuks

“It was as if, as other photographers were travelling further and further afar for their images, I, on the contrary, was retreating more and more,” he recalls. And that’s when he found himself considering a certain window in his home—one with frosted glass that obscured the greenery beyond and cast diffused light across the small table in front of it. “I became interested in the window itself and how it changed daily, as well as how it affected my space differently every time I sat at the table,” he says. To borrow a phrase from the writer Xavier de Maistre, then, this was something of a lesson in how far we can “journey around our rooms”—about the places our minds can take us, inspired by the quietest and most seemingly mundane corners of our dwellings.

Over time, alongside his reading and writing, Blaufuks began photographing the window scene, and, in the pictures, the framing itself never changes. Instead, what differs is only ever the items on the table, the light, and whether the window is open or closed. He called the resulting project Attempting Exhaustion—which speaks to his considerations of whether it’s ever possible to exhaustively photograph a place, or in other words to “describe it fully and completely” he says.

From the series “Attempting Exhaustion” © Daniel Blaufuks

Sometimes, it’s a combination of faces as well as places that photographers return to, as with the British photographer Colin Pantall, whose gorgeously emotive publication Sofa Portraits collects images he has taken across the years of his daughter, Isabel, on their worn-out but much-beloved family sofa. Pantall and his wife used to travel a lot for work before having their daughter, but once she arrived they needed more of a permanent base. They moved into a flat in Bath, UK, and the sofa in question came with the property.

“I was working a lot at home and cared for Isabel when my wife was working, so I started photographing closer to home because that is what I was immersed in,” he explains. “It was an accident to begin with. But by doing so, I began to photograph the same things, to see the rhythms, the slight shifts in light, in mood—in expression and in being—that took place over the course of a day, a week, a month, a year. And that overlapped with having our daughter at home, and watching her shift as she grew from a baby into a young child, a girl, and now a woman.”

From the series “Sofa Portraits” © Colin Pantall

Pantall says that photographing Isabel on the sofa repeatedly brought with it different emotional elements. “She watched TV when she was tired; when she came home from school, or a trip to the woods or the park, or when she was sick. She liked someone to be there and that someone would sometimes be me. Sometimes I’d watch with her, sometimes I’d do something else, and sometimes I’d photograph. She inhabited that space physically and emotionally… Over the year or two that I photographed, she visibly grew up on that sofa. And when we left it behind, that’s when the project ended.” In this way, each image in Sofa Portraits is like a little act of care and love; revealing how the camera was there for so many domestic moments, both subtle and significant, as well as how important the sofa itself became as a sort of stage for it all to unfold upon.

From the series “Sofa Portraits” © Colin Pantall

Another artist who feels the emotional potential of re-photographing a scene is Deanna Dikeman, whose project Leaving and Waving saw her photograph her parents waving goodbye to her outside of their home as she left after a visit. Beginning in 1991 with an impulse to take a snapshot of them from her car, the project organically became a ritual for Dikeman and would continue on for the next 27 years.

“My photos started as a personal remembrance of family moments, but gradually I realized I had a documentary project that could mean more than my private memories. I was in the process of telling a visual story,” she says. “Could I show how I felt about being a daughter who lived 400 miles away from her parents?” The images are moving beyond words; a catalog of her parents’ soft expressions captured in the same way every time, against the backdrop of their suburban house.

Leaving and Waving, 7-1991 © Deanna Dikeman

When asked if the work is about taxonomies, Dikeman says, “the series certainly can be considered a taxonomy of family farewells. While I was living the moments, I was only photographing my life and using my photography as a way to soothe my sadness. In retrospect, the series has new meaning for me, and yes, it is a way to review life’s shifts and changes,” she says.

“I can see subtle differences that were invisible in day-to-day (or sometimes year-to-year) life. For example, as they stand side by side in 1992, Dad is taller than Mom. By 2007, he’s the same height. In the last year of his life, Dad is regularly using a cane and later you can see Mom’s hand gripping his arm so he doesn’t fall. In his last photo, he’s leaning on their car for support. My son, who was in the car seat in 1997, is driving the car by 2013. The black dog in 1995 has grey fur in 1998. The wrinkles deepen, the faces sag, the waving hands become arthritic, and time marches on.”

Leaving and Waving, 3-2007 © Deanna Dikeman

Dikeman’s father was the first to pass away and she remembers after his funeral her mum mildly protested the project continuing. “‘But Mom, we’ve got to keep going,’ I said, wanting the project to continue,” recalls Dikeman. And so she kept waving, and her daughter kept photographing. “I now understood that the goodbye pictures were telling a longer-term story, and I knew that one day I would end the series with an empty driveway,” she says.

So what can be unearthed from a chronological, slowly-shifting photographic portrait of a place and the people in it? The artists gathered together here have told us stories that speak to the power of taxonomies and the poetics of sameness, and together, their works—though different in subject matter and intent—go some way to revealing the hidden aspects of human life that can be uncovered by returning to the same subject day after day, and year after year.


Enjoy more great photography:

18 Dec 19:00

A New Apple Campaign Shines a Light on the Diverse Possibilities of Accessible Tech

by Kate Mothes

In an empowering new ad from Apple, accessibility features of the brand’s products take center stage. Backed by an energizing soundtrack by Australian ensemble Spinifex Gum that puts famed boxer Muhammad Ali’s 1974 “I am the greatest” speech to music, scenes emphasize the features of phones, watches, and computers that allow people with physical disabilities to access myriad creative and life pursuits: a deaf mother is alerted to her child crying, a performer uses his camera to access the stage door, and a man makes various facial expressions to edit photos. Directed by Kim Gehring, “The Greatest” is a stunningly produced campaign that evinces the powers of greater access to technology for all.

 

A still of a video with a mom and child

An animated gif of a performer walking toward the stage door

A video still of feet holding a phone

An animated gif of a person using an iPad

A video still of a phone

An animated gif of a man using his computer to edit photos

A video still of a performer in a dressing room

Do stories and artists like this matter to you? Become a Colossal Member today and support independent arts publishing for as little as $5 per month. The article A New Apple Campaign Shines a Light on the Diverse Possibilities of Accessible Tech appeared first on Colossal.

16 Dec 10:14

Vibrant Coral Expresses the Power of Nature in Courtney Mattison’s Whirling Ceramic Wall Relief

by Kate Mothes
A large-scale, ceramic wall sculpture of coral in a spiraling shape.

“Gyre I” (2022), glazed stoneware and porcelain, 75 x 75 x 11 inches. Photography by Daniel Jackson for Brandywine Museum of Art. All images © Courtney Mattison, shared with permission

In Courtney Mattison’s elaborate ceramic wall reliefs, the rich textures and hues of coral sweep elegantly across vast surfaces. Made of numerous individual pieces that she forms by hand, each composition references the fragility, diversity, and resilience of marine ecosystems, which she describes as an effort to “visualize climate change.” Currently on display at the Brandywine Museum of Art, “Gyre I” draws inspiration from forces of nature exemplified in the immense power of hurricanes and the delicate spirals of seashells or flower petals.

See “Gyre I” in Fragile Earth through January 8, 2023, and find more of Mattison’s work on her website and Instagram.

 

A detail of a colorful ceramic wall sculpture in many colors of coral.

A detail of a colorful ceramic wall sculpture in many colors of coral.

A detail of a colorful ceramic wall sculpture in many colors of coral.

A detail of a colorful ceramic wall sculpture in many colors of coral.

A detail of a colorful ceramic wall sculpture in many colors of coral.

A detail of a colorful ceramic wall sculpture in many colors of coral.

Do stories and artists like this matter to you? Become a Colossal Member today and support independent arts publishing for as little as $5 per month. The article Vibrant Coral Expresses the Power of Nature in Courtney Mattison’s Whirling Ceramic Wall Relief appeared first on Colossal.

11 Dec 12:00

Photographer Masayuki Oki Focuses a Humorous Lens on Japan’s Feline Residents

by Kate Mothes
A photograph of a motorized scooter with two cats sitting in the seat, appearing as if they will drive it.

All images © Masayuki Oki, shared with permission

The archipelago of Japan consists of more than 6,800 islands, of which around 280 are inhabited, and in a few places, known as neko-shima or “cat islands,” felines vastly outnumber the human residents. Fishing villages like the one on Aoshima, the most well-known of around a dozen cat islands, introduced the creatures in the early 20th century to combat rodent infestations. Their prolific progeny, perched on walls and scampering underfoot, have been a continuous source of fascination for photographer Masayuki Oki.

For the past eight years, Oki has documented clowders of cats in his home city of Tokyo and on islands around the nation, focusing on the feral animals’ interactions. Viewed through a an anthropomorphic lens, the images capture playful pounces and awkward entanglements with humor and a knack for good timing.

You can follow Oki’s feline adventures on his blog and Instagram. He releases annual calendars featuring some of the year’s best photographs, and he also updates a YouTube channel with short videos of furball shenanigans.

 

A photograph of two cats, one walking in the foreground and the other looking about ready to attack its mate.

A photograph of a black cat climbing down a vending machine full of drinks.

A photograph of two cats sitting on a box, one massaging the other's back.

A photograph of a cat carrying a fish in its mouth.  A photograph of a cat grabbing at a dog's leash in the street.

A photograph of a black-and-white cat playing with a flower in a pot.

A photograph of a black cat embracing or attacking a white cat.

A white cat sitting on the top of the wall, meowing at the photographer. A photograph of two cats, one with its paw on the shoulder of the other.

Do stories and artists like this matter to you? Become a Colossal Member today and support independent arts publishing for as little as $5 per month. The article Photographer Masayuki Oki Focuses a Humorous Lens on Japan’s Feline Residents appeared first on Colossal.

07 Dec 09:27

Georgian Culture and Ukrainian Pride Highlight the 2022 Tbilisi Mural Fest

by Grace Ebert
A photo of a mural portrait of a woman holding a bouquet of flowers

By Sasha Korban. All images by Tiku Kobiashvili, courtesy of Tbilisi Mural Fest, shared with permission

For the last four years, Tbilisi Mural Fest has facilitated more than 40 public artworks around the Georgian capitol, and the 2022 event brought a spate of new projects to the city. Given the nation’s proximity to Russia and that country’s groundless war against Ukraine, festival organizers highlighted renowned Ukrainian muralist Sasha Korban who painted a large-scale portrait of a woman in customary clothing facing the Russian embassy. Other works include celebrations of Georgian culture and history, like a large-scale tablecloth with traditional motifs by Chertova Tina and Mohamed l’Ghacham’s dreamlike rendering of the living room of Georgian thinker and author Ilia Chavchavadze.

See some of the 2022 additions below and those from previous years on Instagram.

 

A photo of a large blue mural with ornamental white motifs

By Chertova Tina

A photo of a black and white portrait mural of a woman with colorful doodles on her face

“Circus” by Luis Gomez de Teran

A photo of a mural of a dreamlike living room

“Illia’s Room” by Mohamed l’Ghacham

A photo of a mural with two women and a plant, repeated three times vertically

“Growth” by Artez

A photo of an abstract mural on an urban building

By Kera

A photo of a mural with two figures and a portal

“M3D3A” by Vesod

A photo of a mural with two regal figures and city

By Dato Machavariani and Irakli Qadeishvili

Do stories and artists like this matter to you? Become a Colossal Member today and support independent arts publishing for as little as $5 per month. The article Georgian Culture and Ukrainian Pride Highlight the 2022 Tbilisi Mural Fest appeared first on Colossal.

05 Dec 09:40

Helena Costa – Shooting Film In The Land Of The Midnight Sun

by alexgray

In this interview we get to know Helena Costa, a veterinarian whose research into whale health has led her all the way to Northern Norway and the Arctic Circle, photographing this breath-taking landscape on film.

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04 Dec 11:55

Making a Moment: Guido Rocatti’s Long Exposure of Volcán de Fuego

by alexgray

In this edition of Making a Moment, Guido Rocatti (aka @ruido) tells us about his trip to Guatemala, a hike to an active volcano, and shares why the experience connected him with his late grandmother.

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27 Nov 15:54

Making a Moment: Guido Rocatti’s Long Exposure of Volcán de Fuego

by alexgray

In this edition of Making a Moment, Guido Rocatti (aka @ruido) tells us about his trip to Guatemala, a hike to an active volcano, and shares why the experience connected him with his late grandmother.

Read More

17 Nov 09:38

Why?

by RZZ

Photo by Blake Kunin

More photos from past zines, magazines, and books.

Click here to check what we have available.

Photo by Brian David Stevens

Photo by Magdalena Wywrot

Photo by Chris Leskovsek

Photo by Jai Tanju

09 Nov 09:49

Wooden Pixels Dissipate from Han Hsu-Tung’s Fragmented Figurative Sculptures

by Grace Ebert
A photo of a pixelated wooden sculpture of a man on a horse

“Hussar” (2022), mixed wood, 71 x 81 x 26 centimeters. All images © Han Hsu-Tung, shared with permission

Digital and analog realms collide in the dynamic sculptures of Taiwanese artist Han Hsu-Tung (previously). Using soft western redcedar or Laotian fir, Han carves wooden animals and figures that are whisked into pixels, which appear to dissolve and float away from the central form. One of his most recent works, the stately warrior-like “Shaolin,” also features a kinetic component that shifts the blocks in jarring, horizontal movements. Taking approximately three to four months to complete, each work blends a computerized vision with the traditional medium as it draws attention to the scattered nature of the virtual world and how individual elements are essential to the whole.

Explore more of Han’s fragmented sculptures on his site and Instagram.

 

A photo of a pixelated wooden sculpture of a man

“Sunset Clouds” (2022), mixed wood, 57 x 43 x 14 centimeters

A photo of a pixelated wooden sculpture of a man

“Shaolin” (2020), western redcedar, 130 x 78 x 40 centimeters

A photo of a pixelated wooden sculpture of a man on a horse

Detail of “Hussar” (2022), mixed wood, 71 x 81 x 26 centimeters

A photo of a pixelated wooden sculpture of a rooster

“The Dawn” (2021), western redcedar, 101 x 77 x 40 centimeters

A photo of a pixelated wooden sculpture of a rooster

Detail of “The Dawn” (2021), western redcedar, 101 x 77 x 40 centimeters

A photo of a pixelated wooden sculpture of a man

“The Pacific” (2020), western redcedar and Laotian fir, 180 x 150 x 84 centimeters

A photo of a pixelated wooden sculpture of a man

Detail of “Sunset Clouds” (2022), mixed wood, 57 x 43 x 14 centimeters

.

Do stories and artists like this matter to you? Become a Colossal Member today and support independent arts publishing for as little as $5 per month. The article Wooden Pixels Dissipate from Han Hsu-Tung’s Fragmented Figurative Sculptures appeared first on Colossal.

08 Nov 09:36

The Anonymous Project: Slide Attitude

by Michaël Naulin

Lee Shulman, the creator of The Anonymous Project, invited Blind to his small Parisian studio. The collector and his team receive, select and sort thousands of slides of unknown people and give them a second life.

L’article The Anonymous Project: Slide Attitude est apparu en premier sur Blind Magazine.

05 Nov 21:47

In Focus – Jim Mortram

by hannahgross

We speak to Jim Mortram, who is this week's In Focus interview. Jim is an award-winning Social Documentary Photographer and the creator of these photo stories: Small Town Inertia.

Section 1 - Background

Share your favourite image / print shot on ILFORD film and tell us what it means to you?

This portrait with Carl, as always for me, was made with HP5 Plus pushed to 800. When I first met Carl & began collaborating with him on sharing his story he was in a bad place. We would talk often but it was maybe six years before he was ready to have his portrait made. Working in low light is often a challenge, one I love.

The circumstances kind of steer everything into a moment of stillness, much like the relationship between painter & sitter, which really aids in the physicality of making a photograph within these conditions, this was 1/15th sec and handheld. This was maybe the third roll of film I’d ever exposed, hand developed at home.

Jim Mottram

Carl

Just in case anyone doesn’t know who you are or what you do can you give us the overview?

I’m firstly a principle unpaid carer for my Ma, I quit art school in the 90’s to return to the family home to look after her. About 15 years in I was loaned a camera & quickly discovered that what I wanted to do with the rest of my life was to amplify the stories of those within my local community that were enduring the pressures & stresses of policies that were punishing those of the epidermis of the community, especially policies like Austerity.

How and why did you get started shooting film?

I’d learned upon & primarily used an old (now) Nikon D700 DSLR which really suited my budget, I bought it used & still use it today for the bulk of my documentary work. After a time though I began feeling the pull of film. I wanted a more rewarding process than sitting at a desk facing a PC for hours & I also had a deep desire to learn something new. Film also knitted into my plans for a new book, that will be a real love letter to my town & its people, primarily portraits & landscapes. Much slower than the documentary work that I make, more painterly.

Who has been your biggest photographic inspiration to date?

Donna Ferrato. Few are as brave, relentless in their pursuit of righteousness or as visually literate as Donna. She’s the GOAT.

What is the best piece of photography tip or advice you have ever received?

Probably the best thing I’ve learned from the many people that inspire me is about conduct behind the camera & after the photograph is made. A camera is just a paperweight until we pick it up, our intent is everything.

What film photography related projects are you currently working on (or are in the pipeline)?

After I complete Small Town Inertia 2 I’ll finish 3, which will be 100% film.

What / where is your next shoot and how do you decide what film / kit you will use?

Well, it’s tricky at the moment as I’m shielding at home. Covid is very high in our area & as a carer I have to place the safety of my family first & also those that I collaborate with, many of whom are high risk to Covid also... but as soon as its safe I’ll return to all I do!

What are your photographic goals going forward? (Can be business or personal).

Complete the books I’m working on.

Jim Mortram Jim Mortram

Jim Mortram

Section 2 - Shout outs

We all need a bit of inspiration and love so this is your chance to tell the community about yours – from the film photographers whose work inspires you, the labs you trust with your film, your ‘go to’ film photography stockists, your favourite community darkrooms or just anyone in the community who you feel deserves a special mention.

Give a shout out to your 3 favourite film photographers (not photography hubs) currently active on IG or Twitter and briefly tell us why others should follow them.

https://www.instagram.com/gilesduley Makes the most amazing work, a true force of nature, always illuminating & fighting for survivors of wars.

https://www.instagram.com/donnaferrato Made ‘Living with the enemy’ & for over twenty years, has been documenting the effects of domestic violence on abused women and their children.

https://www.instagram.com/dona_ann_mcadams Maker of the most beautiful prints & photographs.

Give a shout out to your favourite photography YouTube channels (apart from the @ilfordphoto one).

https://www.youtube.com/c/japancamerahunter is my go to.

Give a shout out to your favourite photographic retailers (name, location and website).

https://www.wexphotovideo.com have always been amazing.

Give a shout out to your favourite lab service, if you have one, (name, location, website).

http://www.londondarkroom.com The best B&W printers in the UK.

Jim Mortram

Jim Mortram

Section 3 - Favourite kit

What film cameras do you own and which is your favourite? (Please send us a picture of it if you can).

If it's working & I can get my hands on it, I’ll use it.

Aside from your camera, lenses and film what accessories make it into your camera bag?

Audio recorder.

As this is an ILFORD interview it would be remiss of us not to ask about your favourite ILFORD products. Tell us you favourite ILFORD film, paper or chems and why?

HP5 plus all the way, it’s the greatest!

Jim Mortram

And finally…

Nominate one other person you think should fill in this form and we will reach out to them

@WalkleyMatt

The post wordpress-seo$s appeared first on Ilford Photo.

05 Nov 21:42

William Gedney

by Sarainés
William Gedney (1932-1989) grew-up in upstate New York and then moved to Manhattan at the age of nineteen to attend … More
05 Nov 21:32

Photographer Levon Biss Illuminates the Strange, Otherworldly Chrysalises of Butterfly Pupae

by Grace Ebert
A photo of 30 butterfly pupae

All images © Levon Biss, shared with permission

A photographer known for using the macro to investigate the micro, Levon Biss (previously) continues his explorations into the vast world of entomology. His recent butterfly pupae series centers on “the diversity of design and form” through illuminating portraits of approximately 30 specimens as they undergo metamorphosis and complete the final, most vulnerable stage of the transition from adolescence to adulthood.

Otherworldly and bordering on the bizarre, many of the chrysalises have evolved to be deceptive in appearance, acting as necessary camouflage from potential predators by impersonating nearby plants and surroundings: some mimic the natural, like those that imitate a rotting plantain or mossy hunk of bark, while others are more artful, like those spotted with Kusama-esque dots or cloaked in a mirrored gold coating. The photographs are “intended to be both entertaining and educational,” Biss shares, “allowing the viewer to appreciate the diversity in the subject whilst appreciating the intricate details that evolution has created.”

Pick up a print of the unearthly images, and find more from the collection on Biss’s site and Instagram. If you’re in New York, you can also see his Extinct and Endangered series at the American Museum of Natural History.

 

A photo of a butterfly pupa that looks like a plantain

A photo of a butterfly pupa with black dots

Two photos of green butterfly pupae

A photo of a butterfly pupa that looks like mossy bark

Two photos of butterfly pupae that are brown and green

A photo of a butterfly pupa that looks like mirrored gold

Do stories and artists like this matter to you? Become a Colossal Member today and support independent arts publishing for as little as $5 per month. The article Photographer Levon Biss Illuminates the Strange, Otherworldly Chrysalises of Butterfly Pupae appeared first on Colossal.

05 Nov 21:31

Designed for Leisure, Sarah Ross’ ‘Archisuits’ Question the Inhospitable Environments of American Cities

by Grace Ebert
A photo of a person wearing a blue bulging leisure suit that nestles into the built environment

All images © Sarah Ross, shared with permission

Among American cities, Los Angeles has a reputation for being particularly car-centric, and it lacks the infrastructure for walkability or a robust public transit system. This choice of design is inherently political, as it makes commutes and travel across neighborhoods more inaccessible for people who don’t drive.

There’s also the fact that public spaces available to pedestrians generally aren’t constructed with comfort in mind, an issue Chicago-based artist Sarah Ross sought to remedy back in 2005 with the satirical Archisuits. Absurdly shaped, Ross’s four leisurewear pieces bulge with supports that perfectly fit into the negative space of benches, fences, and building facades. The designs draw a contrast between the soft, bendable wearables and the cold, rigid architecture, which the artist describes as “an arm of the law, a form that uses the built environment to police and control raced, classed, and gendered bodies.”

Nearly twenty years later, the project retains its original relevance and has gained new urgency as the climate crisis requires mass reduction in car use and an overhaul in how we collectively conceive of public areas. Ross shares with Colossal:

The same issues are happening where people are criminalized for being poor, black, brown, or disabled in public space. In many places around the globe, there is a turn to the right a monopoly of power is concentrated into the hands of the very few. We continue to live in siloed, segregated worlds.

Find more of the artist’s projects that consider how politics inform spaces on her site.

 

A photo of a person wearing a blue bulging leisure suit that nestles into the built environment

A photo of a person wearing a blue bulging leisure suit that nestles into the built environment

A photo of a person wearing a blue bulging leisure suit that nestles into the built environment

A photo of four people wearing blue bulging leisure suits

Do stories and artists like this matter to you? Become a Colossal Member today and support independent arts publishing for as little as $5 per month. The article Designed for Leisure, Sarah Ross’ ‘Archisuits’ Question the Inhospitable Environments of American Cities appeared first on Colossal.

06 Oct 17:38

Street Artist Blu Protests the Valencia Port Expansion with a Tumultuous Battle Between Nature and Guards

by Grace Ebert

All images © Blu, shared with permission

The legendary anonymous street artist known as Blu has spent his career critiquing the ills of capitalism, the carceral system, and the destruction of the environment, among myriad other problems afflicting the world today. One of his most recent projects brought him back to Sensemurs Valencia to paint a charged mural protesting the expansion of the port in the Spanish city.

The 2022 festival centered around the government’s extension of the industrial area to the north, which would “mean, among many other things, the final lunging to the beaches of l’Albufera (and) the multiplication of air pollution of ships and truck traffic.” Part of a movement to halt the proposal, the public art event brought several muralists to the city, including Blu, whose multi-part work features a battle between fist-shaped trees and port defenders. Similar to some of his earlier projects, this piece is designed as a sequence that when photographed and stitched together, creates an animation. Yellow shipping containers morph into armored guards, who are swiftly pummeled and destroyed as nature resurges from the ground.

To see more of Blu’s recent works, including a piece speaking to the current fossil fuel crisis, visit his site and Instagram.

 

 

29 Sep 13:12

Milkweed, Cypress Spurge, and Other Native Plants Soar into the Sky in Mona Caron’s Poetic Murals

by Grace Ebert

“Balsamorhiza” (2022), Lesher Center for the Arts, Walnut Creek, California. All images © Mona Caron, shared with permission

Towering far above their real-life counterparts, the wild specimens that populate Mona Caron’s murals emphasize nature’s inherent beauty and resilience. Clusters of pink petals peek out from behind curled milkweed leaves in Denver, while the wispy stalks of a euphorbia plant sprout flowering tendrils on an apartment complex in Bellinzona, Switzerland. Many of the botanic murals shown here are part of the San Francisco-based artist’s ongoing Weeds series, which places flourishing plants among largely urban environments as a metaphor for the endurance of the natural world.

Caron (previously) has been prolific as of late, having worked in several cities around the world, and you can find glimpses into her process and information about her subject matter on Instagram.

 

“Milkweed” (2022), in Denver, Colorado, for Broadstone Kendrick

Detail of “Balsamorhiza” (2022), Lesher Center for the Arts, Walnut Creek, California

“Euphorbia” (2021-2022), Bellinzona, Switzerland

“Euphorbia” (2021-2022), Bellinzona, Switzerland

“Milkweed” (2022), in Denver, Colorado, for Broadstone Kendrick

Detail of “Milkweed” (2022), in Denver, Colorado, for Broadstone Kendrick

“Quebra-tudo, Abre Caminhos” (2022), in collaboration with Mauro Neri

“Quebra-tudo, Abre Caminhos” (2022), in collaboration with Mauro Neri

29 Sep 13:11

Paul Nicklen Photographs the Colorado River as It Etches Itself Like Veiny Branches into the Landscape

by Gabrielle Lawrence

“Written in Water.” All images © Paul Nicklen, shared with permission

It is a common understanding in writing studies that to recount a disastrous event in literal and graphic detail may damper the purpose of the story by pushing the reader away. In order to elicit experiential feelings, writers often learn to employ tools and strategies such as metaphor, poeticism, and structure. This could also be understood as an exercise in empathy because rather than force the reader to feel by summarizing the experience for them, the writer creates an environment where one can reach for closeness and camaraderie in their own ways.

Paul Nicklen, pioneering conservation photographer (previously), calls nature “the first and greatest artist” in his latest collection, the Delta Series. To expand Nicklen’s statement across disciplines, nature may also be the first and greatest writer. In the series, he captures the vestiges of the Colorado River that trickle, roar, and finally, crawl their way down to Baja, Mexico. Though the silt itself is the site of tragedy, traces of freshwater gorgeously spread like branches, or fingerprints, or lungs, or as Nicklen writes, like veins.

 

“Arbol de Vida”

These lines not only tell the story of the “megadrought,” a term scientists use to describe the impact of the climate crisis since the year 2000 on an already dry West—as of June, both the U.S. and Mexican governments have agreed to release water from irrigation canals and restore the ecosystem in Baja—but they also craft the effects of reduced snowpack, thirstier soil, and higher temperatures into a grand metaphor for the interconnectedness of life. Even in the midst of ruin, nature speaks in symbols. With its last breath, the river reaches for its kin: the ocean. Unable to meet that immense body, the water carves its final words into the landscape. The familiar shape of its sprawl reminds us that we are inseparable, intimately woven into each other, and share responsibility for every living thing around us until the very end.

Nicklen’s Delta Series is on view as part of Evolve, which opens on October 1 at Hilton-Asmus Contemporary in Chicago. See more of the photos on his website and Instagram.

 

“Arterial Shadows”

“Amber Crossroads”

“Painted Forest”

“Arterial Poetry”

29 Sep 13:11

Wing Lift

Once the air from the top passes below the plane of the wing and catches sight of the spooky skulls, it panics, which is the cause of turbulent vortices.
17 Sep 09:08

Knock loud, I’m home.

17 Sep 09:08

Through the woods, Patrick Joust






patrickjoust | flickr | tumblr | instagram | facebook | prints

Through the woods, Patrick Joust

16 Sep 08:02

The Big Drip, Lois van Baarle (prints!)

15 Sep 11:01

We cover the waterfront, Apo Genc

15 Sep 11:01

Hang on, Spiros Loukopoulos