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12 Jul 07:16

Portraits of People Whose Traditional Māori Tattoos Disappear in Wet Plate Photos

by Jessica Stewart
Suko

How fascinating the difference between the two photographic techniques! Makes you wonder what other details have been lost in time from issues like this.

Wet Plate Photography of Māori by Michael Bradley

Gary Shane Te Ruki

Inspired by wet plate portrait photography of the past, photojournalist Michael Bradley‘s Puaki is an examination of the Māori culture. Specifically, Bradley explores tā moko, the permanent markings on the face and body practiced by New Zealand's indigenous culture. With his set of stunning portraits, he visually recalls the near erasure of this important cultural tradition.

Bradley, who has been practicing wet plate photography since 2013, first stumbled upon the concept for Puaki when looking at wet plate images where people's tattoos often didn't appear. This was a spark to investigate the history of tā moko and develop the long-term project.

“In Māori culture, it is believed everyone has a tā moko under the skin, just waiting to be revealed,” writes the Te Kōngahu Museum of Waitangi. “The problem is, when photographs of tā moko were originally taken in the 1850s, the tattoos barely showed up at all. The wet-plate photographic method used by European settlers served to erase this cultural marker—and as the years went by, this proved true in real life, too. The ancient art of tā moko was increasingly suppressed as Māori were assimilated into the colonial world.”

Tā moko has seen a resurgence since the 1990s and the pride each participant takes in their markings is clear in Bradley's photographs. By comparing the digital and wet plate photographs, it's clear that tā isn't only about personal expression, but a cultural marker that is worn with dignity.

Puaki, which means “to come forth, show itself, open out, emerge, reveal, to give testimony,” is Bradley's way to plant a seed with the public. He hopes they will learn more about tā moko and how Māori culture forms an integral part of modern society. Almost erased from the pages of history, the practice is a demonstration of how cultural traditions can continue to flourish in the modern age.

Puaki is on view at the Te Kōngahu Museum of Waitangi in New Zealand until September 2, 2018.

Puaki focuses on the tā moko of the Māori by juxtaposing digital and wet plate portraits.

Māori Portrait Photography by Michael Bradley

Paora Rangiaho

Wet collodion photography by Michael Bradley

Paora Rangiaho

Māori Tā moko tattoos

Te Kahautu Maxwell

Wet plate portrait photography by Michael Bradley

Te Kahautu Maxwell

Māori Portrait Photography by Michael Bradley

Naomi Tracey Robinson

Wet collodion portrait photography by Michael Bradley

Naomi Tracey Robinson

The 19th-century technique seems to “erase” the subjects' facial tattoos, much as tā moko almost disappeared until a resurgence in the 1990s.

Māori Portrait Photography by Michael Bradley

Pouroto Nicholas Hamilton Ngaropo

Puaki by Michael Bradley

Pouroto Nicholas Hamilton Ngaropo

Māori Portrait Photography by Michael Bradley

Catherie Murupaenga-Ikenn

Māori Portrait Photography by Michael Bradley

Catherie Murupaenga-Ikenn

Māori Tā moko tattoos

Tunuiarangi Rangi McLean

Wet plate photography by Michael Bradley

Tunuiarangi Rangi McLean

Māori Portrait Photography by Michael Bradley

Whare Isaac-Sharland

Wet plate photography by Michael Bradley

Whare Isaac-Sharland

Photojournalist Michael Bradley also interviewed all the participants, with individual films available on the Puaki website.

Michael Bradley: Website | Facebook

My Modern Met granted permission to use photos by Michael Bradley.

Related Articles:

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The post Portraits of People Whose Traditional Māori Tattoos Disappear in Wet Plate Photos appeared first on My Modern Met.

11 Jul 23:52

Wall Art

Suko

Basically.

At first, I moved from pokémon posters to regular oil paintings, but then these really grumpy and unreasonable detectives from the Louvre showed up and took them all. They wouldn't even give me back my thumbtacks!
11 Jul 20:04

Interview: Artist Stretches Delicate Strands of Thread to Produce Awe-Inspiring Rainbows Indoors

by Sara Barnes
Suko

Beautiful.

String Art by Gabriel Dawe

Gabriel Dawe Plexus No. 35 at the Toledo Museum of Art. Photo: Andrew Weber

Artist Gabriel Dawe creates awe-inspiring thread art that is seemingly magic. Simply put: he makes rainbows indoors. Known for delicate site-specific installations, the massive pieces span sections of art galleries—but that’s not all! His work also appears in places where anyone can see it, including airports and office buildings. No matter its locale, the stretched thread pieces conjure the same effects: they dazzle with reflected light and send even the most casual passerby into a momentary state of wonder.

Dawe’s textile art is the product of following a creative intuition that began as a way to challenge the constraints of masculinity and the patriarchy. As a child, he remembers his grandmother teaching his sister to embroider, but not him because he was a boy. In his adult years, he realized that, if he wanted, he too could acquire this skill. Learning embroidery and attending graduate school ultimately lead him to the installations that have earned him worldwide acclaim.

A rise in popularity and an enthusiastic audience response to his pieces have naturally caused his work to evolve (and grow) in meaning over the years. But throughout it all, he has not lost sight of the characteristics that are important to him. One of the most important components is color; he uses hues to help subvert the world’s narrow view of gender and identity to allow people to express who they truly are.

“A really important aspect of my work is the color,” he tells My Modern Met. “It took the installations to really give me the permission to explore with the full spectrum. I've always really liked really bright colors. To me, tolerance is the embodiment of joy. So, not just color but the full spectrum. I love the idea that all of these different components come together to form a unity.”

We were honored to speak with Dawe about artistic practice. Scroll down to read our interview with him, which has been edited for clarity and condensed for length.

String Art by Gabriel Dawe

Plexus No. 35 at the Toledo Museum of Art. Photo: Andrew Weber

Your past has really played into the artwork that you're currently making. Can you briefly describe the influence for the installations?

It developed out my work with textiles. I don't really have training in textiles. I never weaved and never went to school to learn the technique. When I decided to become an artist, I was not the best painter and so I was trying to find my way of not just being another mediocre painter.

I remembered the frustrations from when I was a kid that my grandmother would teach my sister how to embroider but she wouldn't teach me because I was a boy.  So when I decided to become an artist, I remembered that frustration and decided, “Well, now I'm a grown man and I can decide for myself to actually do embroidery.” I just taught myself how to embroider and that's sort of what took me to the trajectory that eventually landed me on making the insulation.

Thread Art by Gabriel Dawe

Plexus No. 19 at Villa Olmo, Como, Italy

Thread Art by Gabriel Dawe

Plexus No. 19 at Villa Olmo, Como, Italy

How long was that time between you teaching yourself and then starting on the installations?

It took years. My background was in graphic design. I was really in this mentality of producing. I was used to having to produce and having deadlines. I think my biggest concern was that I was never going to be able to make a living because it took so long to make one single piece. But, you know, I stuck with it. I went to grad school and then in grad school, things evolved pretty fast. It's when I started doing installations.

String Art by Gabriel Dawe

Plexus A1 at the Renwick Gallery of the Smithsonian American Art Museum. Courtesy Conduit Gallery. Photo: Ron Blunt

String Art Installation by Gabriel Dawe

Plexus A1 at the Renwick Gallery of the Smithsonian American Art Museum. Courtesy Conduit Gallery. Photo: Ron Blunt

Do you do use any software to plan how the thread is going to be installed or is it drawn out?

I have come to an understanding of the geometric principles in play, so I don't use any algorithms or software to help me figure out what's going to happen or how a piece is going to be installed. I sketch on [Adobe] Illustrator; it's really much faster to draw on the computer.

In very few instances, I do rely on 3D software just to make sure that we have high clearances. Especially when working on commissions where you don't want people to be able to touch it because otherwise, it's not going to last.

String Art by Gabriel Dawe

Plexus No. 24 at the Contemporary Art Museum, Houston, Texas

How has the conceptual basis for these vibrant installations changed over time? Has it shifted or have you learned new things by doing them?

[The installations started off as a big experiment with the material and what the material was. I started doing embroidery because I wanted to challenge the notions of masculinity that I grew up with and challenging the patriarchy in my own small way. I really liked, in the beginning, that how these massive installations were stemming from that idea. I still see that connection [today].

People are not necessarily going to see that when they look at the installations, but I still feel that it's an extension of that embroidery practice [combined with] experimentation with the material and using the material of clothing in an architectural scale.

Site Specific Installation by Gabriel Dawe

Plexus C18 at the San Antonio Airport

[continued] So that component started surfacing at the beginning—how buildings and clothing both have the function of sheltering. But then when you use the material of the clothing on an architectural scale, you lose that physical sheltering quality, but it gets transformed into this very childlike quality. It becomes like a sheltering of the soul in that way.

[The sheltering of the soul] started surfacing once I was working with thread for a while and then I realized that these pieces were really material. That's when I decided to use the full spectrum [of color] to reinforce the idea of light because they kind of look like frozen rays of light in space.

And because I see how people really react to these pieces, it almost feels like when people encounter my work, they are having an immediate reaction. You can see their human masks fall and they just go to this childlike wonder space. [The installations] have become a sort of catalyst to have a sensory quality of bringing people to a place of inner joy.

Site Specific Installation by Gabriel Dawe

Plexus No. 30 at the Newark Museum

So when you create these pieces is that  “inner joy” and what the viewer might feel now at the forefront of your mind?

It is, and the other thing is more formalistic qualities and how they relate to the [specific] space they're going to be in and how the insulation is going to activate a space. There's this sort of unspoken dialogue between me and the building of, like, what is the building asking of me so I can translate it into an installation.

One of the things that I really enjoy is being in a new space and wondering how can I do something here that is going to make me push the work. I think that the work has been evolving very subtly over the years. I revisit things and make a subtle change or striking change. I really try to not just hash out the same thing over and over but really try to figure out how the work will unfold over time.

Site Specific Installation by Gabriel Dawe

Plexus No. 31 at the Newark Museum

What are you working on now?

I just did an installation for the launch of a line of carpet that I collaborated on with Mannington Commercial. It's called the Moiré collection and it's inspired by the installations.

String Art by Gabriel Dawe

Plexus No. 34

Site Specific Installation by Gabriel Dawe

Plexus No. 36 at the Denver Art Museum

Gabriel Dawe: Website | Instagram | Facebook

My Modern Met granted permission to use photos by Gabriel Dawe.

Related Articles:

Embroidery Artists Are Using a Needle and Thread to “Paint” Gorgeous Stitched Art

Indoor Rainbow Made of Thread Flows Through the Toledo Museum of Art

What is Installation Art? | History and Top Art Installations Since 2013

The post Interview: Artist Stretches Delicate Strands of Thread to Produce Awe-Inspiring Rainbows Indoors appeared first on My Modern Met.

11 Jul 18:15

Aerie’s New Lingerie Campaign Is a Beautiful Smorgasbord of Representation & Inclusivity

by Vivian Kane
Suko

This is pretty cool and cute lingerie too.

aerie #aerie real

Aerie, American Eagle’s brand of lingerie and sleepwear, has been promoting messages of inclusion and body positivity for a while now. Back in 2014, they launched their #AerieReal campaign, pledging only to use un-airbrushed, un-photoshopped images of models in their ads. The move turned out to be a great one, and their sales went through the roof. Turns out women don’t need (or even want) images of unrealistic beauty standards to buy bras. Who knew?

This season of #AerieReal ads go even further, and features real women—as in non-professional models—wearing Aerie products. The representation is kind of incredible. There are women of all sizes and body types, ages, and race.

image: Aerie

The website also a features a number of women with disabilities, chronic illness, surgery scars, and other conditions.

images: Aerie

People with visible disabilities and conditions are so severely underrepresented in fashion and other media. These images, then, are having a big impact on people who aren’t used to seeing themselves reflected like this.

Aerie is proving that outdated images of “perfection” aren’t representative of true female beauty, and they definitely aren’t needed to sell clothes, not even lingerie and bikinis.

(images: Aerie )

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10 Jul 20:23

50+ Contemporary Artists to Keep an Eye on Featured in One Gallery Show

by Sara Barnes
Suko

I'm not usually into art like this but I really like some of these pieces. The gentle almost sweet creepiness is cool.

Audrey Kawasaki at the Spoke Art Gallery

“Ohana” by Audrey Kawasaki

The Spoke NYC gallery is known for its striking exhibitions of exciting contemporary painting, illustration, and sculpture, and its latest New York City exhibition lives up to its reputation. Called Suggestivism: Resonance, the show features over 50 contemporary artists from around the world that are at different points in their careers; some, like Audrey Kawasaki, are well-established while others are up-and-coming in their creative journeys.

Suggestivism is curated by Nathan Spoor, who selected the title to refer to the conceptual basis for which these works were created and therefore included in the show. “The term ‘suggestivism’ refers to the ability of an individual to pursue their purpose with an amplified understanding and sensitivity,” Spoor states in a press release. The artists involved in the show create vivid narrative art that invites us to imagine who these characters are and the worlds they inhabit. They do this through abstracted portraits, architecturally-inspired sculptures, and macabre paintings loaded with symbolism. While different in their approaches, each has a rich visual language to share.

Suggestivism made its debut at Spoke Art San Francisco in 2016; now, it’s on view at the gallery’s Lower East Side location with a book of the same name. The show is on currently on view through July 28, 2018.

Spoke NYC has a new exhibition on view called Suggestivism: Resonance, which highlights alluring narrative art from artists around the world.

Figurative Art at the Spoke Art Gallery

“Parallel Self” by Sarah Joncas

Narrative Art at the Spoke Art Gallery

“Bloom” by Kristen Reichert

Narrative Art at the Spoke Art Gallery

“Metamorphosis” by Marisa Aragon Ware

Figurative Art at the Spoke Art Gallery

“Phantom Rain” by Tanya Shatseva

Figurative Art at the Spoke Art Gallery

“Black Hole In The Milky Way” by Tanya Shatseva

Figurative Art at the Spoke Art Gallery

“Symbiosis” by Natalie Foss

Figurative Art at the Spoke Art Gallery

“Loveloss – Salvation” by Meredith Marsone

Figurative Art at the Spoke Art Gallery

“Loveloss – Reach” by Meredith Marsone

Figurative Art at the Spoke Art Gallery

“Ave's Nest” by Amy Sol

Narrative Art at the Spoke Art Gallery

“Qipao Mermaid” by Lauren YS

Figurative Art at the Spoke Art Gallery

“Winter Road” by Dan May

Narrative Art at the Spoke Art Gallery

“Nature of Mind” by Peca

Figurative Art at the Spoke Art Gallery

“They Hunt at Night” by Wendy Truong

Narrative Art at the Spoke Art Gallery

“Premonition” by Nathan Spoor

Figurative Art at the Spoke Art Gallery

“Akkorokamui Jr.” by Scott Musgrove

Narrative Art

“Rara Avis” by Johnny Rodriguez

Narrative Art at the Spoke Art Gallery

“Solace” by Miles Johnston

Spoke Art Gallery: Website | Instagram | Facebook

My Modern Met granted permission to use photos by Spoke Art Gallery.

Related Articles:

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The post 50+ Contemporary Artists to Keep an Eye on Featured in One Gallery Show appeared first on My Modern Met.

10 Jul 06:48

hey, i'm seeing hamilton uk in a month and i'm super curious abt how terera's burr is different! could you explain a bit?

Suko

I love the idea of a nerdy social-outcast Burr.

Oh goodness! Hm let me see if I can gather my thoughts here.

So far, up until London, all the Burrs I’ve seen have fallen on a spectrum that goes from 1 (I am cool and collected and sleek and prepared and On Purpose and Lying In Wait; this comes naturally to me and until I met goddamn Hamilton I was sure it was the way to success. But he keeps winning so maybe I need to change my game plan??? You want fire, America?? I will BE fire. I will Light The Frickin Sky– oh shit I fucked up) to 10 (there is a FIRE inside my heart, my ambition and my drive BURNS ME ALIVE, and I keep all that passion shoved and contained and shackled deep down inside my soul except when I’m at the height of the song Wait For It, when the audience gets the first glimpse of Me and it puts them on the thudding edges of their seats, because I think control, patience, grit, and determination is the way to success, even if I have to fight with myself to embody those things. I will wait. I will strive. I will survive everything thrown at me and I Will Win, using this inner, burning core of myself to drive me forward– but Hamilton is on fire just like me, he doesn’t hide any of it, he just goes, and he just Wins. How does that work? It’s not fair and I’m angry about it? Well fine let ME finally release all the chains I’ve bound myself with – oh shit I fucked up)

Most Burrs fall somewhere along that spectrum, 1 to 10, either on fire within and finally letting go at Room Where It Happens, or full of a more icy drive and instead lighting themselves on fire at that moment. But Burr is sleek, controlled, purposeful, powerful, suave, ambitious– the question generally is whether that is his nature, or an affect he puts on, something calm and controllable and purposeful in a life that’s had so much random tragic chaos in it.

But Terera? He walked on stage and it was like… Ok so this Burr definitely got stuffed into lockers and had his lunch money stolen at college. Dude, YOU kill a man?

Odom Jr’s voice is like melted butter, and Terera’s has got this whine? Whine isn’t quite the right word, he has a great voice, but I’m blanking on the word I want. His voice has Character. He’s an anxious, slightly frazzled nerd. His Burr is doing his best, he’s fairly content, he’s not burning up on the inside with fire or with ice. He doesn’t fit on the spectrum. /And it works/. I didn’t expect it to.

When he said “Theodosia, she’s mine,” in Wait For It, the audience /laughed/. When Odom does that line you’re like DAMN, DUDE, YOU BOLD, but the audience laughed at Terera’s anxious, twitchy Burr. But then by the end of the song, he’s got you. I went into Wait For It going ‘hmmmm um mr. Burr I am not sure how you are going to pull off the second act, you’ll need to be like mad, and scary, and stuff? uh, I dunno,’ but by the end of the song it was like, 'nope, nvm, I’ll wait for it, yes sir, it’ll come.’

He’s got it, okay, it’s just a different Burr. He doesn’t start from a place of undying ambition and change his methods, the way Odom (and most other Burrs) do. Odom knows what he wants and he Will Get It, and he loses himself because he takes a leaf out of Hamilton’s book and dooms them both. It’s a fall. Odom’s Burr and Hamilton are both tragic heroes.

Terera’s Burr is a tragedy to, but it’s… different. When Burr falls somewhere on the 1-10 where-does-your-chill-live spectrum, he and Hamilton are two opposing poles of the narrative. It’s a story of the unstoppable force meeting the immovable object, and it’s captivating, mythic, breathtaking.

Terera’s Burr isn’t Hamilton’s equal and opposite. He’s his friend. His story isn’t mythic; it’s the coming of age story of a kid Hamilton’s age or so, who grows into the man who can pull the trigger in one bright instant of poor, bitter choice.

He gets corrupted by the narrative, he gets sucked in, and you Feel for him, okay? It’s like… when I hit the end of the story, with Terera’s Burr, it still felt inescapable that /someone/ was gonna shoot Hamilton. It was always going to come to this. But there was nothing preordained or unchangeable about who– Burr feels like the wrong kid in the wrong place. It’s a different sort of heartbreaking.

It makes it a way more human story, sort of? It almost genre shifts, sort of? Like as much as you can when the only change is an actor. It becomes a story about people, normal people, all tossed together in a little country, and all the unkindnesses they wreak upon each other if unchecked.

I really like the unstoppable force/immoveable object throughline of Hamilton, and I missed it not being there in London. But damn if I’m not gonna call Terera astonishing and powerful, and the story he helped make there a damn good one. I just didn’t realize how transformative a different Burr would be nor how well he would fit into the existing words while making them all ring different.

They /laughed/ at “Theodosia, she’s mine.”

I think Room Where it Happens is one of the big turning points– I mean, for Burr, it IS his turning point. But for the spectrum Burrs it’s where they change their METHODS– decide to let lose their inner fire; or to emulate Hamilton, if their inner drive is all ice and determination or whatever. But Terera’s Burr changes his /goal/ there. He realizes what he /wants/ or maybe /that/ he wants. I dunno, it’s just different. It rang really different, all of it. But it’s GOOD.

Oh oh and also, at the beginning of Washington on Your Side, it’s great (the Jefferson for this cast is spot on, Jason Pennycooke), Burr starts singing “wouldn’t it be nice” etc and Jefferson just does this like offended triple take like– 'who are you?? Why are you approaching the cool kids table? Why is this four talking to a ten??? Oh but wait I /do/ really want to vent about Alexander tho let’s harmonize.’

And as you watch, you can see Burr watching Jefferson and Madison carefully, jumping in a word late on lyrics, trying to learn the ropes and Be the Plotter He Wants to See in The World.

I dunno, there was just a lot of stuff like that that really rang true and made sense. He was so much a character. He had so much more of an arc. It felt so much more like he was in a coming of age story, and that just really changes the whole feel.

Let me know what you think, when you see it!

09 Jul 07:01

xenosaurus: xenosaurus: There are three basic categories of fic writer: type one: fan fiction is a...

Suko

I don't even read a lot of fanfic and I feel this is probably pretty accurate.

xenosaurus:

xenosaurus:

There are three basic categories of fic writer:

type one: fan fiction is a love letter to canon, only small changes unless it’s an au!!

type two: the source material can bite me, I don’t give a fuck

type three: horny

sorry, I forgot one

type four: canon COULD be so good if it wasn’t so straight/white/horny, so I fixed it while holding unblinking eye contact with the creator and mouthing ‘die’

04 Jul 19:55

I read your Steve and Logan bits and they are amazing. But consider this; Steve learns that Logan, who's older than WW1, has lost his memories. He gives a statement in an interview describing this man, this patriot who always looked after other people in his own gruff way, describes his side-burns, his claws, his cigars. And suddenly, people are calling into the station; "Yeah, think I met this guy a few years ago" "My granddad has this photo..." "So, In this bar one time..."

Suko

This is delightful. I wish it were a comic series.

And all these people call in, sharing their own memories of this mysterious Cryptid named Logan who is apparently an immortal, grumpy, wandering dad-friend who’s also a patriot and he helped punch out Nazi’s and free camps and beats up assholes who don’t respect women. And the whole while Logan is watching this from a TV screen with Kitty or Rogue holding his hand so gently, after they dragged him to the couch in a hurry. “You recording this?” “Don’t worry, we won’t let you miss a single word.”

Okay but if we’re gonna do this we’re gonna do this HARDCORE HISTORIAN STYLE, and it initially comes up while Steve is being interviewed for a book about the Howling Commandos or a bit for the History Channel or something.  Because this person is like “Hey, there are a bunch of stories of you showing up somewhere with only one dude for backup, was that Bucky?”  And we’ll assume that this is before the whole Winter Soldier thing, so that’s not a hideously loaded question.  

And Steve kind of laughs and he’s like, “Oh, wow, God, that was actually this dude on detached duty from the Canadian special forces, he and I got sent on a bunch of missions together.  His name was Logan, he was the weirdest guy I ever met, and I knew some pretty weird guys, but he could take a hit even better than I could, so when the Howlies were laid up, they sent us out together.”  And he launches into this story about how one time he and Logan stole a plane complete with pilot and stormed a prison camp that was holding German Jews before sending them up to Poland, and the historian he’s talking to is taking frantic notes and trying not to drool because THIS IS A NEW GUY.  CAPTAIN AMERICA’S STORY IS METICULOUSLY WELL DOCUMENTED BUT NO ONE’S EVER MENTIONED THIS GUY.

There are no pictures, obviously, so Steve does a sketch for this historian, because he’s helpful like that and also because.  Like.  Listen.  Steve’s been through a lot of weird shit, and to be sure this Logan he used to know could take a bullet and keep coming no problem, but this dude’s probably been dead fifty or sixty years.  No harm in giving him a little posthumous glory, right?

So this historian runs back to her university and starts doing research on the Internet.  She reaches out to her coworkers first, then to anyone else she knows, then to the premier WWII and Captain America scholars of the world, and asks all of them “Do you happen to know who the fuck this dude is?”

And like, no, they don’t.  They’ve got no idea.  Steve’s not even totally sure what the guy’s real last name was, because Jameson is common as hell and there’s no Logan Jameson on the books.  So they start doing research into this WWII cryptid, and finally they reach an old woman who listens to her grandson’s boyfriend talk passionately about this new project he’s working on and goes “Oh, yeah, I met Cap in Germany one time, there was a guy with him who sounds kind of like what you’re talking about.”

This passionate history major immediately sends an email in all caps to his adviser and it just says “MY BOYFRIEND’S GRANNY KNOWS WHO WE’RE TALKING ABOUT PLEASE COME TO KANSAS ASAP THANKS” or whatever, because, listen, historians are Like That.  Speaking as someone who could easily have claimed to be a history major based on my thesis, I would have gone to Kansas in 0.2 seconds if someone had been like “What’s up we found that book you were after but we can’t take it out of the museum.”  It does stuff to you.  Trust me here.

So this woman tells the story of how Cap and his weird buddy broke her and her mother and father out of a temporary prison camp, and this history professor immediately takes all the tiny bits of information and starts asking around, looking for literally anyone else who knows this Logan dude.  He saved your ass one time in Paris?  He gave you some rations in Berlin?  He beat your grandfather’s ass in Russia?  He took three bullets for you?  You had a passing conversation?  This historian and his extremely pumped undergrad who just changed his senior thesis want to hear about it.

And then someone gets in touch with them and is like “Hey, I know you’re looking for WWII stories, but this guy saved my dad’s entire unit on the Somme and I have pictures?”  And someone else is like “Hey, I have a file from a Vietnam MASH unit for a Logan who looks like that guy, do you want it?”  And someone else is like “Uh, fuck all of y’all, I think this is him in the Civil War, what do I do about that?”

AND SO BEGINS LOGAN, THE HISTORICAL CRYPTID.

This undergrad is taking an extra year of college and basically getting a Bachelor’s degree in Tracking Weird Mutants Through History, and also his adviser is very lucky to be on tenure, because otherwise he would have been laughed out of the college three times by now.  But there is an absolute preponderance of evidence, is the thing, so it just turns into this massive quest to investigate exactly whether or not Logan the Mystery Dude was actually in China for the Boxer Rebellion or whatever.

Forget this being a collaborative effort between colleges, there are multiple continents involved in this by now.  Canadian government is under pressure to turn out their WWII special operations files for this guy from five different big name universities in five different countries, including their own.  Things are getting a little wild in academia.  Steve’s been interviewed nine times and he has a filter set up in his email specifically to catch stuff from the University of Toronto.

It takes a little bit for Kitty’s bubbe to get a phone call.  Kitty’s bubbe has been living a quiet-ass life in Illinois and likes it that way, especially because her last name is not Pryde and therefore Kitty and her weird friends can crash at Bubbe’s house whenever they’re in the area without any trouble.  It’s fine if her granddaughter wants to run around in spandex and save the world and shit, she’s honestly much more chill about it than Kitty’s parents, but Bubbe does not care for news crews in her neighborhood thank you very much.

But so eventually this nice old Ashkenazi woman gets a phone call from an extremely pumped undergrad who read a very brief statement she gave in a news article forty years ago about Captain America, who she is very grateful to for breaking her, her older sister, and their little brother out of a prison camp during WWII and also helping them get across the border.  Did she happen to see anyone else?  Why yes, very polite young man, the Captain had another man with him, he was very grumpy but he let my brother ride on his shoulders so I liked him very much.  That’s great, would she mind if someone came and talked to her about that?  No, very polite young man, not at all, when would work for you?

And she gives Kitty a call that night, because she gives Kitty a weekly call since Kitty and her parents are going through a rough spot to the tune of “please God stop risking your life//listen I’m saving people I’m not going to stop learn to cope”.  Bubbe mentions offhand that she’s going to have a talk with this very polite young historian about the Shoah and Kitty’s understandably a little concerned for her bubbe’s mental health, and asks some questions.  

So Kitty hears her bubbe out in increasing degrees of shock, hangs up the phone, and immediately goes and does an extensive google.

Then she goes and hammers on Logan’s door until he says to come in, slams her computer down in front of him, and says “Holy shit, Logan, why didn’t you tell us that you knew Captain America?”

“Uh, because I mostly didn’t,” Logan says, wary.  “Don’t remember that much.”

“You might want to take a look at this, then,” Kitty says, and Logan looks through her fifteen tabs and thanks her and calls the university that seems best informed.

Which is the story of how an extremely pumped undergrad gets a phone call from the object of his thesis that opens with “This is gonna sound pretty fuckin’ wild, but my name is Logan and I’m pretty sure you can catch me up on the last hundred years better than I can.”


Oh, and then Logan and Steve meet up again and it’s very nice and sweet and that undergrad gets a full ride to the PhD program of his choice.  The full ride’s name is actually Tony Stark, who’s doing a favor for Steve, who’s doing a favor for Logan, who’s secretly doing a favor for the undergrad, but no one really knows that.

24 Jun 08:40

katiekat917: fearhyren: char-portraits: Initiate by Ilse...

20 Jun 01:38

mirrorfalls: Fundamentalist fearmongering video: This dungeon “master” is given complete control...

by simply-sithel
Suko

OH GOD SO TRUE.

mirrorfalls:

Fundamentalist fearmongering video: This dungeon “master” is given complete control and “players” must do whatever dark things are demanded of them.

Real DM: Please, just cross the river. You’ve all tried to seduce the catfish and it didn’t work. I’m begging you.

17 Jun 07:31

Interview: Photographer Preserves the Frail and Forgotten Beauty of Abandoned Places

by Jessica Stewart
Abandoned Building Photography

Art nouveau orangery
This post may contain affiliate links. If you make a purchase, My Modern Met may earn an affiliate commission. Please read our disclosure for more info.

Through his artistic photography of abandoned places, Matt Emmett documents the frail beauty of once lived in spaces. Forgotten Heritage is his incredible photographic archive, which spans over 5 years of seeking out and photographing places that have been forgotten in time. Thanks to Emmett, that which is abandoned becomes art.

The adventurous photographer, who was named “Arcaid Architectural Photographer of the Year” in 2016, has seen his work featured in Architectural Digest, among other publications. Traveling throughout Europe to find deserted locations, his photography examines the spirit of each architectural ghost in detail.

Published in 2016, his book Forgotten Heritage brings together some of his favorite locations and the stories behind them. From abandoned mines to crumbling villas, Emmett's work has made him one of the leading photographers in the genre. Recently, we had a chance to ask him a bit about his work, what inspired him about abandoned places, and what location he'd love to photograph. Read on for our exclusive interview.

Forgotten Heritage - Matt Emmett

Ruined chateau

Photo of Abandoned House by Matt Emmett

Farm cottage fireplace

What first intrigued you about abandoned spaces and how did this come together with your photography?

My introduction to the abandoned world happened totally by accident! Near the start of 2012, a friend asked me to give him a practical lesson or two on his newly bought DSLR and said that we should go somewhere with a specific focus to practice the skills. It just so happened he picked a long-abandoned industrial location, about half an hour drive from where we lived, for the second lesson.

I was very nervous about going there and entering a place that we were not supposed to be, but after looking online at the imagery of other photographers who had already been inside, I felt compelled to at least give it a try. So that is how I found myself at 6 am in early February with my heart pounding at the fence line of an ex-jet engine testing establishment.

Forgotten Heritage - Matt Emmett

Jet engine testing establishment

What was that experience like?

Once inside the huge hanger-like structures, we were confronted by scenes straight out of a science-fiction film; subterranean metallic tunnels where the engines were tested in supersonic airflow, giant turbine halls, and workshops with strange machinery everywhere. It was at this point that my future direction as a photographer was decided. I have been hooked on the buzz of discovering, capturing and bringing fascinating history into peoples homes ever since.

I think the reason I am so addicted to it is down to the fact I am quite an introspective and retrospective person. If you have any kind of interest in history, architecture, industrial processes and generally like taking a look into places that would otherwise be closed off, then this hobby will enrich and fulfill you.

Forgotten Heritage - Matt Emmett

Control desk

Your website is called “Forgotten Heritage,” which is a very deliberate choice in wording. What does heritage mean to you and why do you think it's important to document it?

I chose the name Forgotten Heritage because it perfectly summed up the plight of the amazing places I go to create the images. Initially, the project was simply about enjoying the fun of exploring and the fascination I experienced whilst shooting these places. As the catalog of photographed locations started growing, people would tell me through my social media channels what an important and much-needed service I was fulfilling.

In time, I have come to the realization that preservation through visual documentation is often the only form of conservation that can occur prior to the building being redeveloped or demolished. Putting the images on a website or social media page creates a publicly accessible record of these places. Don't get me wrong, I shoot these places because I love doing it but the byproduct is often something that can be useful to society too.

I have photographed several historically significant places now that have since been demolished with nothing preserved or saved for future generations to enjoy, the photographic record created by a dedicated community are often the only things we have to remember them by.

Forgotten Heritage - Matt Emmett

Abbey ruins

ruined colonnade

Ruined colonnade

How do you typically find the places you visit?

I would like this answer to be a little more enterprising or exciting but the honest answer is it's mostly info shared by other photographers who have already been to the location or know where it is. Some of the time you can discover places by simply keeping your eyes open as you drive around or by researching specific places on the internet which can yield good results.

Halnaker Hollway by Matt Emmett

Halnaker Hollway

Can you take us through the sort of preparation you go through when preparing for a shoot?

It's always good to get a feel for the location and its surrounding area before you go—Google Maps and Street View are invaluable tools for this kind of familiarization. Knowing where it's good to park and having an idea of the best direction to approach a location from is also a good idea.

I often look up the location prior to a visit to see how other photographers have photographed it, not to copy the shots but to get a feel for each room and try and find gaps in the photo where I could shoot something in a different way or from a different angle. The obvious “money-shots” are always going to be popular and it's hard not to take them but I think when a location has been photographed a lot, then you need to find ways of showing something new.

Abandoned Italian Hospital by Matt Emmett

Italian Hospital, Cloisters

What is the most memorable site you've photographed and why?

There are quite a few that I could mention but if I had to narrow it down, it would be a large abandoned psychiatric hospital that closed its doors in the 1980s. It's a large sprawling building that dominates a small and sleepy town just to the south of Turin in Italy.

Inside it is breathtakingly beautiful with crumbling plasterwork, broken tiled floors, shuttered windows that let in a wonderful filtered light and lots of the medical equipment they use to treat the patient still in-situ. Whilst we spent a good five hours inside, the town outside slowly woke up and disconnected sounds of an hourly clanging church bell or a moped drifted in the windows. It had a magical atmosphere and I think that is the reason why these places are so addictive to photograph.

Forgotten Heritage - Matt Emmett

Patient Records, Italian Hospital

From a technical standpoint, what are some of the difficulties of this type of photography?

You are often shooting in dark and gloomy environments that require long exposures and thus a tripod to keep the camera steady. The interiors of abandoned places are often damp and grimy so a camera and lens setup that can keep out water and dust are also considerations. I use Pentax gear and the weather sealing and build quality are great, making it the perfect choice for me. Additional portable lighting often comes in handy, so maybe a torch with a wide spread of light.

 

Forgotten Heritage - Matt Emmett

Abandoned attic

Abandoned Lead Mine by Matt Emmett

Lead mine

Obviously, I imagine that safety can be an issue with these type of places. What type of precautions do you typically take when entering an abandoned space?

Environmental hazards such as structural weakness, rotting floors, dangerous materials, glass, and nails underfoot are all things you need to be prepared for. The most important thing to go armed with is common sense, if something feels like it could be dangerous then trust your instincts and don't do it.

 

Photo of Abandoned Cooling Tower by Matt Emmett

Cooling tower

What advice would you give to anyone looking to begin photographing these types of places?

If you know who to ask then request permission to photograph. Don't do it alone and cause no damage entering or leaving a site—if you are asked to leave, then do so. Don't take anything from the location as a keepsake, basically treat anywhere you go with respect.

Build the beginnings of a portfolio of shots from these kinds of places and then use that to form ties with other photographers. If people can see you have a genuine interest in the subject, they are much more likely to share information with you. Enjoy it, it's a fascinating photo genre that will teach you lots too.

 

Forgotten Heritage - Matt Emmett

Italian villa

Photos of Abandoned Chemical Storage Containers by Matt Emmett

Chemical storage

Is there anywhere you have on your list to visit, but haven't gotten the chance yet? What intrigues you about it?

There are a series of Titan 1 ICBM nuclear launch sites dotted around various US states. The kind of nuclear launch site where a hatch would swing open in the ground and a large missile rises on a column of smoke out of a subterranean silo. The bunkers contain living areas, control rooms, radar tracking stations, mini power plants, and the large missile launch tubes.

They have not been operational since 1965, the interiors are pitch black and full of nasty chemicals and hazardous materials. Shooting inside them requires portable lighting and specialist safety equipment, but the images they provide are like a scene straight out of hell, totally unique and something quite fascinating and terrifying to behold. The kind of unusual place I love to photograph!

Abandoned Villa Photo by Matt Emmett

Villa R

What do you hope people take away from your work?

That our historic built environment is special and needs preserving. With land on which we can build becoming a much more precious commodity, it's important to properly document a site before it is gone for good. Not every building out there can be restored and preserved but certainly, there are many once important locations that are bulldozed to make way for new developments. The more ways we cut ties with the past the more we diminish our future. Even if the only way we preserve the memory of a building is through images then that is worth something.

Forgotten Heritage - Matt Emmett

Tool makers factory

Forgotten Heritage - Matt Emmett

Farm kitchen

Abandoned Church by Matt Emmett

Castle Acre Priory chapel

Matt Emmett photography

Sunken bunker interior

Matt Emmett: Website | Instagram | Facebook | Twitter

My Modern Met granted permission to use photos by Matt Emmett.

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The post Interview: Photographer Preserves the Frail and Forgotten Beauty of Abandoned Places appeared first on My Modern Met.

15 Jun 08:22

Modern Samurai Soldiers in Japan Are Using Their Sword Skills to Pick Up Trash

by Kelly Richman-Abdou
Suko

I have heard of them before but they are still awesome and I love the hats.

Modern Samurai Isse Ichidai Jidaigumi Japanese Street Cleaners

Recently, people in Japan have been coming up with clever new ways to bring age-old customs into the modern age. In addition to products like the ice cream katana and minimalist kimonos, this trend has also inspired Isse Ichidai Jidaigumi (“Once in a lifetime, on a big bet”), a one-of-a-kind club that reimagines samurai sword skills as a theatrical means to pick up trash.

Each member of this unique group is fittingly dressed in an old-meets-new outfit: a traditional Japanese robe and a modern trilby hat. While clad in these eye-catching ensembles, Isse Ichidai Jidaigumi members roam around Tokyo and Hokkaido, stopping only to simultaneously show off their sword skills while collecting garbage.

Employing the arcs, swings, and slashing motions characteristic of traditional samurai techniques, Isse Ichidai Jidaigumi members use tongs to gather the litter. The trash is then placed into a basket, which is usually carried on one person's back.

In addition to these street-based spectacles, club members also showcase their sword skills—as well as their singing talents and dancing abilities—at various events. One branch of the traveling troop of environmentally-conscious Samurais has even reportedly recorded an album, featuring a surefire hit titled “Trash Time.”

Members of the Isse Ichidai Jidaigumi club have found a creative way to clean up Japan's cities.

Modern Samurai Isse Ichidai Jidaigumi Japanese Street Cleaners

The theatrical troop of Japanese street cleaners use their sword skills to pick up trash.

Modern Samurai Isse Ichidai Jidaigumi Japanese Street CleanersModern Samurai Isse Ichidai Jidaigumi Japanese Street CleanersModern Samurai Isse Ichidai Jidaigumi Japanese Street CleanersModern Samurai Isse Ichidai Jidaigumi Japanese Street CleanersModern Samurai Isse Ichidai Jidaigumi Japanese Street CleanersModern Samurai Isse Ichidai Jidaigumi Japanese Street Cleaners

See the modern samurai solders in action!

h/t: [ Kotaku, Grape]

All photos via Jidaigumi Hokkaido.

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The post Modern Samurai Soldiers in Japan Are Using Their Sword Skills to Pick Up Trash appeared first on My Modern Met.

10 Jun 07:46

Playful Pots Turn Air Plants Into Adorable Ocean Creatures

by Kelly Richman-Abdou
Suko

I love the nautilus and squid ones!

Air Plant Holder Ocean Animals Animal Planters Hanging Planters

This post may contain affiliate links. If you make a purchase, My Modern Met may earn an affiliate commission. Please read our disclosure for more info.

Recently, the air plant has proven popular among fun-loving flora enthusiasts. On top of living a low maintenance life, the plant is admired for its ability to put a playful twist on the traditional pot, whether doubling a crazy hairdo, sprucing up a chess set, or, as in the case of Cindy Searles‘ ceramics, bringing a sea of adorable ocean animals to life.

Featuring colorful squids, curious octopuses, and even a seemingly startled narwhal, Searles' collection of hanging planters puts an under-the-sea spin on suspended plant pots. In most instances, the plants cascade from the pieces, transforming their curved leaves into floating tentacles or legs. Sometimes, the plants sprout from the backs of the animals, turning them into a whale's waterspout or the spines of a pufferfish.

Each enchanted air plant holder is handcrafted and painted by Searles, who captures the diversity of sea animals through fun patterns, bright colors, and eye-catching textures. Accompanied by a steel cable, each ceramic pieces comes ready-to-hang, requiring only the plant itself and making it a “wonderfully whimsical gift for any occasion.”

You can find these aquatic animal planters and more delightful crafts in Cindy Searles' Etsy shop.

In a colorful collection of hanging planters, Cindy Searles brings a sea of adorable ocean animals to life.

Air Plant Holder Ocean Animals Animal Planters Hanging PlantersAir Plant Holder Ocean Animals Animal Planters Hanging PlantersAir Plant Holder Ocean Animals Animal Planters Hanging PlantersAir Plant Holder Ocean Animals Animal Planters Hanging PlantersAir Plant Holder Ocean Animals Animal Planters Hanging PlantersAir Plant Holder Ocean Animals Animal Planters Hanging PlantersAir Plant Holder Ocean Animals Animal Planters Hanging PlantersAir Plant Holder Ocean Animals Animal Planters Hanging PlantersAir Plant Holder Ocean Animals Animal Planters Hanging PlantersAir Plant Holder Ocean Animals Animal Planters Hanging PlantersAir Plant Holder Ocean Animals Animal Planters Hanging PlantersCindy Searles: WebsiteFacebook | TwitterEtsy
h/t: [Brown Paper Bag]

All images via Cindy Searles.

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The post Playful Pots Turn Air Plants Into Adorable Ocean Creatures appeared first on My Modern Met.

08 Jun 09:28

20+ Sticky Note Drawings That Perfectly Capture the Everyday Struggles of Adulthood

by Emma Taggart
Suko

Heh, some of these are particularly awesome. Love the venn diagram and the packing one. Spotify one is also amusing.

Cartoonist Chaz Hutton (aka Insta-Chaz) uses humble sticky notes as his canvas to illustrate the relatable highs and lows of daily life. Using a simple stick-man style in black ink, the artist captures the awkward transition into adulthood with witty diagrams, charts, and simple illustrations all condensed into small, square and rectangle-shaped yellow Post-it notes.

Hutton first started drawing on sticky notes while bored at his desk job in an architecture firm. He tells My Modern Met, “They started off as little drawings I'd make for friends and those friends ultimately convinced me to put them onto an Instagram which I assured them was a terrible idea and that nothing would come of it.” Since its debut in August 2015, the @instachaaz Instagram has gained almost 200,000 followers.

From social media addiction to social awkwardness, the hilarious series expresses “one man’s philosophy of life.” Many illustrations feature thought bubbles that reveal the inner anxieties of the characters, such as a group practicing yoga who are all thinking the same thing: “Everyone here is amazing at this and I look like a complete idiot.” Other works feature witty decision tree diagrams for challenging “how to” scenarios. For “how to cook dinner” a mind map details the panic of buying ingredients, which inevitably ends with returning home with a jar of Nutella—an all too real sequence of events for many.

Today, Hutton works full-time creating his sticky note illustrations—a dream situation he never imagined would become a reality. He recalls, “I thought I might get enough followers to maybe trick a brand or two into giving me some free stuff, so to end up accidentally becoming a cartoonist has been a pretty outrageous outcome.”

You can buy prints from Hutton’s portfolio on his website, and scroll through his Instagram for more chuckle-worthy illustrations.

Cartoonist Chaz Hutton (aka Insta-Chaz) uses the humble sticky note as his canvas to illustrate the relatable highs and lows of daily life.

Sticky Notes Illustrations by Insta-ChazSticky Notes Illustrations by Insta-ChazSticky Notes Illustrations by Insta-Chaz

Each Post-It comic captures the awkward transition into adulthood with witty diagrams, charts, and simple illustrations.

Sticky Notes Illustrations by Insta-ChazSticky Notes Illustrations by Insta-Chaz

From social media addiction to social awkwardness, the hilarious series expresses “One man’s philosophy of life.”

Sticky Notes Illustrations by Insta-ChazSticky Notes Illustrations by Insta-ChazSticky Notes Illustrations by Insta-ChazSticky Notes Illustrations by Insta-ChazSticky Notes Illustrations by Insta-ChazSticky Notes Illustrations by Insta-ChazSticky Notes Illustrations by Insta-ChazSticky Notes Illustrations by Insta-ChazSticky Notes Illustrations by Insta-ChazSticky Note Illustrations by Insta-Chaz InstachaazSticky Notes Illustrations by Insta-ChazSticky Notes Illustrations by Insta-ChazSticky Notes Illustrations by Insta-ChazSticky Notes Illustrations by Insta-ChazChaz Hutton / Insta-Chaz: Website | Instagram

My Modern Met granted permission to use photos by Chaz Hutton.

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The post 20+ Sticky Note Drawings That Perfectly Capture the Everyday Struggles of Adulthood appeared first on My Modern Met.

06 Jun 06:04

I have a giant head.

Suko

So much this.



I have a giant head.

04 Jun 09:41

19th-Century ‘Ribbon Maps’ Let You Put the Entire Mississippi River in Your Pocket

by Jessica Stewart
Suko

OOoo!! 11 feet long but only 3" wide...

Ribbon Map of the Mississippi River

Click for zoomable version. Photo: David Rumsey Map Collection

Before the advent of GPS and Google Maps, plenty of people spent a lot of time fumbling with bulky atlases on the road. But what if they discovered that they could fit 2,600 miles in your pocket? And what if they realized this was actually first accomplished in 1866? Known as ribbon maps, the ingeniously designed piece of paper charted the entire length of the Mississippi River from its source at Lake Itasca, Minnesota to the Gulf of Mexico.

Measuring 11 feet in length, the small strip of paper was just about 3 inches wide and was meant to be wound around a spool that would fit in your pocket. More than a map, the Ribbon Map of the Father of Waters, acted as a guidebook for those traveling down the Mississippi. Marketed to steamboat tourists, the map detailed the interesting river towns one encountered while floating downriver. The second half of the 19th-century was a boom for the steamboat industry, particularly in the lower Mississippi. By patenting their ribbon map, St. Louis entrepreneurs Myron Coloney and Sidney B. Fairchild filled a hole in the market.

Aside from providing tourists with much-needed information, there's a suggestion that the map provided symbolic healing in a country emerging from the wounds of the Civil War. “There was this idea that because the river went from north to south, it was a great unifier for the country,” writes art historian Nenette Luarca-Shoaf. In fact, Coloney and Fairchild incorporated significant battle sites into the map, including plantations and batteries. “These new landmarks form elements of a newly unified river’s historical landscape and reinforce the notion that the Mississippi was national terrain.”

Today, copies are scattered across American libraries, local museums, and cartography collections. Each spooled up in their little cases by a hand crank, they're an interesting forerunner of the pocket maps we commonly see today.

Ribbon Maps were invented in 1866 as a portable guide for travelers floating down the Mississippi River by steamboat.

h/t: [Atlas Obscura]

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The post 19th-Century ‘Ribbon Maps’ Let You Put the Entire Mississippi River in Your Pocket appeared first on My Modern Met.

29 May 01:05

Artist Creates 50 Self-Portraits in the Style of Popular Cartoon Characters

by Emma Taggart
Cartoon Characters Digital Drawing by Sam Skinner

If you’ve ever struggled to find your own artistic style, sometimes the best thing to do is to imitate and learn from the artists who inspire you. 24-year-old Sam Skinner did just that when, in a bid to develop her own cartoon style for a webcomic project, she decided to take on the #StyleChallenge—a popular social media hashtag that encourages creatives to draw multiple self-portraits in the style of different cartoon characters.

From Tim Burton’s goofy gothic style to the wide-eyed, cutesy style of The Powerpuff Girls, Skinner spent one year on the project developing her digital drawing skills. The self-taught artist explains, “Doing this project was simply to help me become more familiar with doing graphic/digital design.” Having started with an initial list of 100 cartoon characters, one of the most challenging parts of the project was deciding which styles to include. Skinner reveals, “I ended up having a list of close to 100 characters I wanted to do, but narrowed it down to 50 by drawing the choices randomly out of a hat.”

Skinner’s illustrations are not only uncanny depictions of iconic characters, but they’re an inspiring chronicle of her artistic development, and proof you can perfect your craft with dedicated time and practice. Skinner reveals, “This is one of the first things I've done that I've been proud enough about to show off to my people. Since this whole project took around a year for me to complete, with a brief hiatus for school, I definitely would say my skills got better the more I worked on it.”

Follow Skinner on Twitter to keep an eye on her upcoming projects.

In a bid to develop her digital drawing skills, self-taught artist Sam Skinner decided to take on the #StyleChallenge—a popular social media hashtag that encourages creatives to draw multiple self-portraits in in the style of different cartoon characters.

Cartoon Characters Digital Drawing by Sam SkinnerCartoon Characters Digital Drawing by Sam SkinnerCartoon Characters Digital Drawing by Sam Skinner

Skinner spent one year on the project, completing a total of 50 self-portraits.

Cartoon Characters Digital Drawing by Sam SkinnerCartoon Characters Digital Drawing by Sam SkinnerCartoon Characters Digital Drawing by Sam Skinner

The artist’s illustrations are not only uncanny depictions of iconic characters…

Cartoon Characters Digital Drawing by Sam SkinnerCartoon Characters Digital Drawing by Sam SkinnerCartoon Characters Digital Drawing by Sam Skinner

…but they’re an inspiring chronicle of her artistic development, and proof you can perfect your craft with dedicated time and practice.

Cartoon Characters Digital Drawing by Sam SkinnerCartoon Characters Digital Drawing by Sam SkinnerCartoon Characters Digital Drawing by Sam Skinner

Next up: Disney, Sonic the Hedgehog, and much more.

The post Artist Creates 50 Self-Portraits in the Style of Popular Cartoon Characters appeared first on My Modern Met.

26 May 01:35

New Study Finds That Sleeping in on the Weekend Helps You Live Longer

by Jessica Stewart
Suko

Vindication! :)

Sleep Research Weekend Sleep Study

Photo: Siriluk ok via Shutterstock

The next time you feel guilty about sleeping in on the weekend—don't. According to a new study by sleep scientists at the Stress Research Institute at Stockholm University, the extra hours of sleep might just keep you living longer. Published in the Journal of Sleep Research, the study's findings contradict the commonly held belief that cramming extra hours of sleep into a few days a week won't compensate for an overall lack of sleep.

But, by using sleep data collected from 44,000 Swedish adults in 1997, the researchers made some new discoveries about sleep patterns and mortality. The scientists followed up with the subjects 13 years after the initial data was collected, and their findings were quite interesting. It appears that those adults who received five hours of sleep or less consistently throughout the week were more likely to have died over the 13 years, as opposed to participants who received at least six or seven hours of sleep during the week.

However, having a lazy weekend appears to reverse this effect for those who only get five or fewer hours of sleep during the week. The extra hours appear to tip the scale in their favor, with their risk of death equal to those who consistently got a good night's rest. This is great news for those who have been told that there is no such thing as “catch-up” sleep.

These findings were based on participants under the age of 65, and compensated for factors like age, gender, body mass, and habits such as smoking. Over the age of 65, researchers found no correlation between sleep time and mortality. So, get your sleep in now and ensure yourself a long, fruitful life.

“The results imply that short (weekday) sleep is not a risk factor for mortality if it is combined with a medium or long weekend sleep,” the researchers wrote. “This suggests that short weekday sleep may be compensated for during the weekend, and that this has implications for mortality.”

h/t: [Mental Floss]

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The post New Study Finds That Sleeping in on the Weekend Helps You Live Longer appeared first on My Modern Met.

23 May 01:22

Street Artist Creates Multi-Layered Typography Puzzles With Hidden Messages

by Emma Taggart
Suko

Typography illusions!!

Typography Street Art by Pref

British street artist Peter Preffington aka Pref plays with perception through his multi-layered, 3D graffiti. Using a range of modern and traditional typefaces, he visualizes popular sayings and expressions in his distinct overlapping style. While these typography murals might seem difficult to decipher at first, it’s this unique style that helps draw the viewer in.

Having started his street art career more than 20 years ago, Pref reveals, “I have always been interested in the idea of graffiti speaking to the general public.” Each of his colorful murals invite the viewer to stop and take a closer look, squint, and tilt their heads to try and figure out the puzzle. He explains, “I have pushed and experimented with this idea of overlapping words, seeing how many I can fit into the space of one word, and then slowly boiling it down and simplifying this idea to become more legible.”

In one particular head-twisting work, Pref paints the words “more” and “less” as a three-dimensional, interconnected word. Depending on your perspective, the words shift into the other, subtly playing on the phrases “more or less” and “less is more.” For the phrase “smoke and mirrors”, the word “smoke” is written in 3D red and yellow letters, while the font for the word “mirrors” appear as a superimposed smoky vapor.

Pref has recently partnered with fellow street artist Gary Stranger to launch a collective called Typograffic Circle. If you’d like to see their work in person, their first group show is on display now through June 3, 2018 at London’s StolenSpace.

You can see more of Pref’s incredible street art on Instagram and buy select prints through his online shop.

British street artist Peter Preffington aka Pref plays with perception with his multi-layered, 3D graffiti.

Typography Street Art by PrefTypography Street Art by PrefTypography Street Art by PrefTypography Street Art by Pref

Using traditional letter forms and font styles, the artist visualizes popular sayings and expressions in his distinct overlap style.

 

 

Typography Street Art by PrefTypography Street Art by PrefTypography Street Art by PrefTypography Street Art by Pref

Each of his colorful murals invite the viewer to stop and take a closer look, squint, and tilt their heads to try and figure out the puzzle.

Typography Street Art by PrefTypography Street Art by PrefTypography Street Art by PrefTypography Street Art by PrefTypography Street Art by PrefTypography Street Art by PrefTypography Street Art by PrefTypography Street Art by PrefTypography Street Art by PrefTypography Street Art by PrefPref: Website | Instagram
h/t: [Colossal]

All images via Pref.

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The post Street Artist Creates Multi-Layered Typography Puzzles With Hidden Messages appeared first on My Modern Met.

23 May 01:03

Interview: Designer Creates a Colorful Herd of Animal-Inspired Chairs

by Emma Taggart
Animal Chairs by Máximo Riera Studio

When we first came across Spanish designer Máximo Riera’s Rhino Chair in 2011, we were blown away by its incredible likeness to the endangered animal. Featuring a surprisingly comfortable-looking throne that merges with the upper half of the rhino’s body, it was the second sculptural design added to Riera’s Animal Chair Collection—the first being the equally-majestic Octopus Chair. Since then, the limited edition series has grown into a mixed herd of animal-shaped chair designs, including an Elephant Chair, a Walrus Chaise Longue, and even a Toad Sofa.

Riera reveals to My Modern Met, “This collection pays homage to these animals and the whole animal kingdom, which inhabits our planet, as an attempt to reflect and capture the beauty of nature in each living thing.” Focusing on capturing the beauty of endangered species, the designer explains, “My intention is to bring the animal kingdom to the urban world, to create awareness in something we are all losing empathy with.” Riera achieves this by cleverly-merging his minimalist, baroque-style seating with textural surfaces that highlight each animal’s form.

Made from solid polyurethane and an internal metal frame, each handcrafted chair takes an average of 500 hours to design and produce. In order to render hyperreal designs that are biologically accurate, Riera and his team use 3D modeling software and cutting-edge engineering techniques. Every individual piece is made with a unique color code, meaning there is only one of each chair ever produced. This mirrors how rare the depicted animals really are in the wild, many of which are sadly dwindling in numbers.

We recently spoke with Riera to ask about the inspiration and processes behind his Animal Chair Collection. Read on for our exclusive interview.

Animal Chairs by Máximo Riera Studio

“The Hippo Chair”

When did you first begin making furniture?

For many years my artistic career was relegated to a secondary role due my professional life in the medical industry. After selling my company and taking professional retirement, I could concentrate on the creative work which has always been my true passion.

What led you to create your Animal Chair Collection?

I have tried to combine both of my biggest joys, nature, and art. This series pays homage to these animals and the whole animal kingdom, which inhabits our planet, as an attempt to reflect and capture the beauty of nature in each living thing.

The inspiration stems from my life experiences, places that I have been and people that I have met. Nature has been a constant in my life. From time to time, I have the necessity of being surrounded by wildlife, which is the reason why I have always lived somewhere near the sea or the countryside. Sadly, not many people have had the chance to experience these animals first-hand, in nature, where they belong. The collection shows us what nature is capable of. It pays tribute to it by bringing those animals into urban life.

Animal Chairs by Máximo Riera Studio

“The Octopus Chair”

Animal Chairs by Máximo Riera Studio

“The Octopus Chair”

How do you choose which animals to pay homage to?

I normally focus on endangered species for my creations. I want to point out their uniqueness and how special these animals are; I hope we all realize this before is too late.

The Animal Chair Collection contains a powerful aura; it is almost like they come to life when you see them in person. They offer an interaction with the spectator through the spiritual form that they resemble. My intention is to bring the animal kingdom to the urban world, to create awareness of something we are all losing empathy with.

Animal Chairs by Máximo Riera Studio

“The Rhino Chair”

Can you describe your design and production process?

I am always trying new techniques and materials. From the brainstorming, I have the intention for creating something new and different. Art always has to break boundaries and being an artist nowadays means that you have to take risks in order to create something new/different – innovative. This is the key to make art evolve.

Regarding the Animal Chair Collection. It is a long process: it takes several months from the initial sketches to the final production process. Apart from the aesthetic and appearance of the pieces, we have to be sure that neither the structure nor the balance are compromised. This requires a lot of hours of engineering and calculations.

This is a limited edition project as each piece is produced in a non-repeatable color code, which results in very unique pieces.

Every piece is manufactured to order for each client, taking approximately 9 to 11 weeks, as they are handcrafted. It takes an average of 500 hours of work for each individual piece.

Animal Chairs by Máximo Riera Studio

“The Elephant Chair”

Animal Chairs by Máximo Riera Studio

“The Toad Sofa”

The post Interview: Designer Creates a Colorful Herd of Animal-Inspired Chairs appeared first on My Modern Met.

22 May 21:29

midding

v. intr. feeling the tranquil pleasure of being near a gathering but not quite in it—hovering on the perimeter of a campfire, chatting outside a party while others dance inside, resting your head in the backseat of a car listening to your friends chatting up front—feeling blissfully invisible yet still fully included, safe in the knowledge that everyone is together and everyone is okay, with all the thrill of being there without the burden of having to be.

22 May 15:22

Animated Dungeons & Dragons Boards Look Like The Future

by Luke Plunkett on Kotaku, shared by Rob Bricken to io9
Suko

These animated D&D maps are pretty but I think I'd get distracted by the movement.

Paper? Cardboard? Plastic models? That’s some 20th century D&D shit. The adventures of the future look like this.

Read more...

20 May 02:53

ink-splotch: Any artists in the house?So… I have the first draft of a novella. One Stormy Day in...

Suko

Sithel?

ink-splotch:

Any artists in the house?

So… I have the first draft of a novella.

One Stormy Day in New Providence [title subject to change ;)]

story by Kat Sundberg @improbabledragon and E. Jade Lomax @ink-splotch

written by E. Jade Lomax

“An heiress, a diplomat’s daughter, an undercover agent, a corporate spy, an ex-detective, and a fraud walk into the small field office of a major insulation conglomerate. Half are there under their proper names. Only one is there to do the job they were hired for. The punchline is friendship.

This selfsame cast could also be described as five liars and one truth-teller; or four employees and two interlopers; or a thief, three people trying to solve the same conspiracy from different angles, an ex-boyfriend, and a woman who desperately deserves a nap.

They are a single mom (and grandma!), a bodyguard playing hooky, the victim of a coercion campaign, a veritable genius with debilitating anxiety and attention disorders, a man trying very hard not to be in love, and a young woman who packs her girlfriend peanut butter and jelly sandwiches every day because it’s the only thing she can reliably make edible.

When a magical storm falls over the city– a storm that freezes not your flesh from your bones, but fries the circuits in your brain– our crew of technicians and liars must set out to fix all that’s gone wrong.”

I’m hoping to commission art for the book– a full or partial color piece for the title page of each chapter, and possibly some black-and-white line drawings for some additional chapter interiors. As each chapter focuses on a different character, and as this book deals somewhat with first impressions, bias, and how where you came from affects how you see things, I’m hoping to have a different artist for each chapter. Style to match content, you know?

If you’re an artist who might be interested in working with me here, send me an ask or email me at ejadelomax@gmail.com.

Ideally, link me to some examples of your work and whatever your rates are. At minimum, I’d be asking for a single, color artwork from each of seven artists. The images I’m planning on commissioning mostly include a single character (some bust, some full-body). Some contain backgrounds, and at least one is mostly abstract/color/looks like the Northern Lights. Any style– hoping to mix and match artists to character!

Note: I’m mostly interested in color pieces for the chapter title pages; however, if you don’t do color but do want to be part of this, I’m potentially interested in doing additional black and white drawings or sketches to illustrate the chapter interiors. Contact me with your rates!

19 May 20:34

Magical Bookends Transform Bookshelves into the Back Alleys of Japan

by Johnny
Suko

Oh my gawwwd... so cool.

If you’ve ever wandered around Tokyo on foot you’ll know that it can sometimes be like a spider web of side streets and back alleys. It’s one of the things that makes Tokyo so unique and therein lies the allure of exploring the massive city. Now, one designer has brought that magic to bookshelves by […]
09 May 19:32

cinemagorgeous:Dragon Bones by artist Stefan Koidl.





cinemagorgeous:

Dragon Bones by artist Stefan Koidl.

04 May 07:19

Nations Illustrated as Fantasy Characters

by Miss Cellania
Suko

I love these. France is awesome, and Canada is adorable.

Russian artist Anastasia Bulgakova draws fantasy characters, including a series of countries in superhuman form. They are mostly warriors armed and armored with their international reputations, and a lot of symbolism. Above you see the UK as a futuristic super punk with his sidekick English bulldog. Germany gets a mech suit to show their pride in engineering.

"I had this idea for quite a while, but maybe the whole recent political situation in the world has pushed me to actually do it," Bulgakova told BuzzFeed. "I wanted to add some humor into the mix, to lighten up the mood of the real-world situations."  

As you can probably guess, the United States has a cowboy hat, way too many guns, and breast implants. My favorite in the series is Canada -or maybe France. See a selection from Bulgakova's nation series at Buzzfeed and others at DeviantART.

25 Apr 19:02

Meteorologist

Hi, I'm your new meteorologist and a former software developer. Hey, when we say 12pm, does that mean the hour from 12pm to 1pm, or the hour centered on 12pm? Or is it a snapshot at 12:00 exactly? Because our 24-hour forecast has midnight at both ends, and I'm worried we have an off-by-one error.
24 Apr 22:08

undeadm0nkeys:plants that think “yeah, I’ll just grow here”





















undeadm0nkeys:

plants that think “yeah, I’ll just grow here”

24 Apr 22:08

sadfishkid: teen mako hanging out in the k-sci lab with her...

Suko

I really want this to be a tv series.


he's quoting coyote peterson and if you don't know who that is then WHAT ARE YOU DOING WITH YOUR LIFE honestly go watch his youtube channel NOW



sadfishkid:

teen mako hanging out in the k-sci lab with her weird science uncles is my favourite pacrim headcanon tbh

(on twitter)

20 Apr 20:31

Clutter

Suko

Pretty much.

I found a copy of The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up, but the idea of reading it didn't spark joy, so I gave it away.