Shared posts

16 Oct 02:00

An Incredible Move: The Indiana Bell Telephone Building

by Unknown

The relocation of the headquarters building of Indiana Bell Telephone Company in Indianapolis remains one of the most fascinating moves in the history of structure relocation.

The headquarters of Indiana Bell, a subsidiary of AT&T serving the US state of Indiana, was housed inside an 8-story, 11,000-ton building built in 1907. In 1929, the phone company decided they needed a larger building, but they couldn’t just demolish the old building because it was providing an essential service to the city. The building was also inconveniently located on the site where they wanted the larger structure. In the end it was decided that the old building will be moved to the back of the plot to make room for the new building.

Indiana Bell Telephone Building

The Indiana Bell headquarters in the middle of the move. Photo credit: William H. Bass Photo Company


© Amusing Planet, 2019.
16 Oct 02:00

Suzuki Concepts for the 2019 Tokyo Motor Show

by Car Body Design
Suzuki Concepts for the 2019 Tokyo Motor Show Suzuki has revealed a group of concept cars inspired by the ideas of fun and excitement that will be unveiled at the upcoming Tokyo Motor Show.
16 Oct 02:00

Garfield - 2019-10-08

16 Oct 02:00

#1918 – Adult

by Chris

14 Oct 23:15

Welcome to the Internet

by Reza
05 Oct 11:27

Oh Kitty.

03 Oct 11:22

Catching Up

by Doug
03 Oct 06:51

Sweat the Small Stuff.

Do you have any little friends that could keep me thoroughly distracted?
03 Oct 06:51

#1907 – Glasses

by Chris
23 Sep 06:18

How do you leave a warning that lasts as long as nuclear waste?

by Ars Staff
Ominous looking skies you've got there...

Enlarge / Ominous looking skies you've got there... (credit: © Emily Graham for Mosaic)

In January 1997, the crew of a fishing vessel in the Baltic Sea found something unusual in their nets: a greasy yellowish-brown lump of clay-like material. They pulled it out, placed it on deck and returned to processing their catch. The next day, the crew fell ill with serious skin burns. Four were hospitalized. The greasy lump was a substance called yperite, better known as sulfur mustard or mustard gas, solidified by the temperature on the sea bed.

At the end of the World War II, the US, British, French and Soviet authorities faced a big problem—how to get rid of some 300,000 tonnes of chemical munitions recovered from occupied Germany. Often, they opted for what seemed the safest, cheapest and easiest method: dumping the stuff out at sea.

Read 67 remaining paragraphs | Comments

19 Sep 22:08

#1908 – Sleepy

by Chris
13 Sep 12:26

Friday the 13th: Part XXV

by Doug

Friday the 13th: Part XXV

It’s another one of my photographed “road” comics, because I’m on the road again. This time, I’m in Portland, debuting my new book at Rose City Comic Con. And another one of the guests happens to be Freddy Krueger himself, Mr. Robert Englund!

Follow me on Instagram to see my adventures at the convention!

12 Sep 06:11

Jungle

by Doug

Jungle

And here are more challenges.

12 Sep 05:55

Garfield - 2019-09-11

12 Sep 05:53

Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal - Apology

by tech@thehiveworks.com


Click here to go see the bonus panel!

Hovertext:
Everyone seems to think this is about current events, but I wrote it weeks ago.


Today's News:

Thanks for giving it a look!

12 Sep 03:56

#1903 – We did it!

by Chris
12 Sep 03:55

Foucault Pendulum

Trust me, you don't want to get on the wrong side of the paramilitary enforcement arm of the International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service.
12 Sep 03:54

Guy Makes Oversized Novelty Weapons from Old Amazon Boxes

by twistedsifter

guy makes toy weapons from old amazon boxes 1 Guy Makes Oversized Novelty Weapons from Old Amazon Boxes

 

Japanese artist, the ‘Crafty Transformer‘, has amassed a large online following for his amazing DIY cardboard creations.

Drawing inspiration from popular videos games, anime, and manga, he recreates well-known character gadgets, weapons, and tools. He even provides templates you can download (found in his YouTube video descriptions) along with step-by-step instructions in his videos.

Below we’ve embedded some of his most popular vids along with some gifs, photos and even a fan-made compilation of his awesome work. For more, check out his YouTube page!

 

 

guy makes toy weapons from old amazon boxes 11 Guy Makes Oversized Novelty Weapons from Old Amazon Boxes

 

guy makes toy weapons from old amazon boxes 12 Guy Makes Oversized Novelty Weapons from Old Amazon Boxes

 

guy makes toy weapons from old amazon boxes 13 Guy Makes Oversized Novelty Weapons from Old Amazon Boxes

 

guy makes toy weapons from old amazon boxes 14 Guy Makes Oversized Novelty Weapons from Old Amazon Boxes

 

guy makes toy weapons from old amazon boxes 15 Guy Makes Oversized Novelty Weapons from Old Amazon Boxes

 

guy makes toy weapons from old amazon boxes 16 Guy Makes Oversized Novelty Weapons from Old Amazon Boxes

 

guy makes toy weapons from old amazon boxes 17 Guy Makes Oversized Novelty Weapons from Old Amazon Boxes

 

guy makes toy weapons from old amazon boxes 18 Guy Makes Oversized Novelty Weapons from Old Amazon Boxes

 

guy makes toy weapons from old amazon boxes 19 Guy Makes Oversized Novelty Weapons from Old Amazon Boxes

 

guy makes toy weapons from old amazon boxes 20 Guy Makes Oversized Novelty Weapons from Old Amazon Boxes

 

guy makes toy weapons from old amazon boxes 21 Guy Makes Oversized Novelty Weapons from Old Amazon Boxes

 

guy makes toy weapons from old amazon boxes 2 Guy Makes Oversized Novelty Weapons from Old Amazon Boxes

 

guy makes toy weapons from old amazon boxes 3 Guy Makes Oversized Novelty Weapons from Old Amazon Boxes

 

guy makes toy weapons from old amazon boxes 4 Guy Makes Oversized Novelty Weapons from Old Amazon Boxes

 

guy makes toy weapons from old amazon boxes 5 Guy Makes Oversized Novelty Weapons from Old Amazon Boxes

 

guy makes toy weapons from old amazon boxes 6 Guy Makes Oversized Novelty Weapons from Old Amazon Boxes

 

guy makes toy weapons from old amazon boxes 7 Guy Makes Oversized Novelty Weapons from Old Amazon Boxes

 

guy makes toy weapons from old amazon boxes 8 Guy Makes Oversized Novelty Weapons from Old Amazon Boxes

 

guy makes toy weapons from old amazon boxes 9 Guy Makes Oversized Novelty Weapons from Old Amazon Boxes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

09 Sep 22:41

A Nice Day

by Reza
09 Sep 22:40

#1901 – Break

by Chris
09 Sep 22:39

Unreachable State

ERROR: We've reached an unreachable state. Anything is possible. The limits were in our heads all along. Follow your dreams.
09 Sep 22:37

Inner Value.

Some people say pearls aren't gems. Those people are jealous, gemless bitches.
08 Sep 22:23

Garfield - 2019-09-08

08 Sep 00:50

No Question

by Doug
08 Sep 00:47

Crops under solar panels can be a win-win

by Scott K. Johnson
"Agrivoltaics" studies like the one pictured here in Massachusetts are finding many crops that pair well with solar panels.

Enlarge / "Agrivoltaics" studies like the one pictured here in Massachusetts are finding many crops that pair well with solar panels. (credit: NREL / Flickr)

Solar panels might seem like they’re in direct competition with plants. One is catching sunlight to do photosynthesis, the other wants to take it to push electrons. Surely Highlander rules apply, and there can be only one on a plot of land, right?

In reality, it’s not a zero-sum game. Some plants will burn in direct sun, after all, and so there are plenty of food crops that would be happy to share their space with panels. And as a new study led by the University of Arizona’s Greg Barron-Gafford shows, the combination isn’t even necessarily a compromise—there are some synergies that can bring significant benefits to a solar-agriculture.

Everybody wins

Prof. Barron-Gafford et al. focused on dry areas like the American Southwest, where water for crops is limiting and things are projected to get drier. The shade provided by solar panels could lower soil surface temperatures and evaporation, the researchers thought, and vegetation could similarly keep the panels themselves a little cooler than a bare ground installation. Since solar panel efficiency drops at high temperature, that could mean more electricity generated.

Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

04 Sep 03:11

Unix at 50: How the OS that powered smartphones started from failure

by Ars Staff
Ken Thompson (sitting) and Dennis Ritchie (standing) in front of a PDP-11. Ritchie annotated this press image for Bell Labs as <a href='https://www.bell-labs.com/usr/dmr/www/picture.html'>"an amusing photo,"</a> and he joked that he had much "more luxuriant and darker hair" at the time of the photo than when it appeared in magazines like the March 1999 Scientific American (which, unfortunately, incorrectly swapped IDs for the two).

Enlarge / Ken Thompson (sitting) and Dennis Ritchie (standing) in front of a PDP-11. Ritchie annotated this press image for Bell Labs as "an amusing photo," and he joked that he had much "more luxuriant and darker hair" at the time of the photo than when it appeared in magazines like the March 1999 Scientific American (which, unfortunately, incorrectly swapped IDs for the two). (credit: Bell Labs)

Maybe its pervasiveness has long obscured its origins. But Unix, the operating system that in one derivative or another powers nearly all smartphones sold worldwide, was born 50 years ago from the failure of an ambitious project that involved titans like Bell Labs, GE, and MIT. Largely the brainchild of a few programmers at Bell Labs, the unlikely story of Unix begins with a meeting on the top floor of an otherwise unremarkable annex at the sprawling Bell Labs complex in Murray Hill, New Jersey.

It was a bright, cold Monday, the last day of March 1969, and the computer sciences department was hosting distinguished guests: Bill Baker, a Bell Labs vice president, and Ed David, the director of research. Baker was about to pull the plug on Multics (a condensed form of MULTiplexed Information and Computing Service), a software project that the computer sciences department had been working on for four years. Multics was two years overdue, way over budget, and functional only in the loosest possible understanding of the term.
Trying to put the best spin possible on what was clearly an abject failure, Baker gave a speech in which he claimed that Bell Labs had accomplished everything it was trying to accomplish in Multics and that they no longer needed to work on the project. As Berk Tague, a staffer present at the meeting, later told Princeton University, “Like Vietnam, he declared victory and got out of Multics.”

Within the department, this announcement was hardly unexpected. The programmers were acutely aware of the various issues with both the scope of the project and the computer they had been asked to build it for.

Read 48 remaining paragraphs | Comments

04 Sep 03:11

Garfield - 2019-08-30

04 Sep 03:11

Love Song

by Reza
04 Sep 03:11

#1900 – Cake

by Chris
04 Sep 03:11

Professional Help

Bonus Comic:

Professional Help Bonus

This design is now available in my shop!

Dr. Fly Notebook