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13 Apr 20:20

Stop Hacking Your Life

by A Manly Guest Contributor
Claudio Navarro Henriquez

Wow, it's like is talking directly to me.

 

time

Editor’s Note: This is a guest post from Kyle Eschenroeder.

“There are a thousand hacking at the branches of evil to one who is striking at the root.” –Henry David Thoreau

“100 Life Hacks That Make Life Easier” –Article published on Lifehacker.com (179k social shares)

As legend has it, Alexander the Great undid the world’s most intricate knot. The Gordian Knot held a royal ox-cart to a post and remained tied for hundreds of years.

Then, in 333 BC, Alexander came along and tried to undo the knot. He, like the hundreds before him, couldn’t loosen it. Did he leave it for others to solve? Of course not! He’s Alexander the Great! He took his sword and solved the problem then and there.

We haven’t stopped swinging swords — and looking for easier, quicker, more direct solutions to life’s knotty problems — since.

A couple thousand years later, in 2004, a fellow named Danny O’Brien mentioned “life hack” in a talk about programmers and the “embarrassing” scripts and shortcuts they use. A hack, especially in computer science, is defined by Wikipedia as an “effective but inelegant solution” to a problem.

In 2005, Lifehack.org was created, and the concept took off and no longer centered just on tech shortcuts, but learning easier, niftier ways to do everything from cutting an onion to improving your focus. That same year, the American Dialectic Society named “lifehack” (now one word) as runner-up for its annual “most useful word” award, second only to “podcast.” (Where “love” or “courage” placed on their list I have no idea.)

In 2007 Timothy Ferriss published The 4-Hour Workweek and extended the idea of lifehacking to running a business and creating a leisure-filled lifestyle. Probably 80% of all entrepreneurial and productivity-oriented lifehacks you come across online were popularized by Tim’s book.

In the 2010s, articles, books, and even scientific studies focusing on lifestyle optimization have proliferated. Headlines scream: “You’ve Been Doing This Wrong All Along!” and we dutifully click to figure out how to make the needed improvements. We read up on getting our sleep schedule just right, our diet perfected, and our environment just so, and we tirelessly comply with the advice experts offer by tracking our steps, our breaths, and how much we moved while we snoozed.

All of these lifehacks promise a better life with less effort.

It’s an irresistible offer.

Why untie a knot when you can cut it with your sword?

Two Relationships to Hacks

hack

Many people have had success using these life optimization tools and tricks, and they’re not necessarily a bad thing. Their effect all depends on which of two relationships someone has with hacking:

  1. Hacking for something. When Alexander the Great cut the Gordian Knot he didn’t care about much else besides getting the ox-cart off the pole. Cutting the knot was the best solution to his problem. When a programmer finds a hack that allows him to move forward he has done the same thing. The focus is on an outcome and the hack is a way to get there. This often means solving problems creatively.
  2. Hacking for hacking’s sake. Then there is the person scrolling through Lifehacker collecting listicles. Reading and re-reading the same hacks spewed out a thousand times. This is the person who won’t go to the gym until they know for a fact that they have the “perfect” workout regimen. This is the person who doesn’t start a business because they don’t know how; they always have to do just a little more research before they get going. These are the people who are constantly talking about how they need to get up earlier, to cut out gluten, to implement the Pomodoro technique

Hacking approach #1 can be beneficial; every man should have a little MacGyver in him and keep some duct-tape solutions in his back pocket. And if there’s a better way to cut an onion, by all means, go for it.

But hacking approach #2 invariably leads to a life that’s less optimal, not more. The damage results not so much from the actual hacking practices themselves, but from the mindset their pursuit and adoption begets.

It’s a mindset marked by “Efficiency Paranoia.” You become more focused on hacking — finding just the right tools and environment — than on your goal, and your big-picture progress towards it. You forget that tools must be used to matter. You overlook the fact you are capable of figuring things out on your own (and that the work required to do so can be a great source of pleasure).

The hacking mindset thinks the answer is “out there.” This is why we Google things like “What should I do with my life?” or click on articles that promise “How to Be More Courageous in 5 Easy Steps.”

The hacking mindset tells us that once we master the right seduction techniques we will finally fall in love with the woman of our dreams.

The hacking mindset tells us we will not have to surmount the obstacles on the way to our aims if we can simply find a way around them.

The hacking mindset flatters the part of us who’s lazy, who always wants to take the path of least resistance, who loves feeling superior to the “chumps” who are taking the hard way. But, despite all our new technological advancements, life itself remains stubbornly impervious to hacking. You do not get to cheat death. You do not get to escape being human. You cannot circumvent the universal law which dictates that all goals require work, time, pain, and suffering to attain. The obstacle remains the way.

Once you free yourself from the hacking mindset, you no longer have anxiety that someone out there might have the secret that will finally make everything fall into place. The restless FOMO that comes from thinking there is a more effective way to do something, and the anxiety that you’re not doing life “right,” dissipates. You trust yourself more and become less needy. You begin to effectively assimilate and use information instead of fearfully hoarding it. You enjoy the climb instead of cursing it. And, lo and behold, though you do not take the “optimal” path, you magically, paradoxically, get a whole lot more done.

To liberate ourselves from something that’s so thoroughly ingrained in our culture, we need to learn to see the deleterious ways it manifests itself. So let’s look at six problems presented by the hacking mindset.

Why a Focus on Hacking Leads to a Less Optimal Life

lights

Hacking Stigmatizes Effort

“The whole glory of virtue resides in activity.” –Cicero

If less effort is the goal, exerting effort is a kind of failure.

There is a special breed of “lifestyle designers” who seem to only do things so that they can go travel. (And it seems they only travel for trophy pictures.) Every obligation or responsibility they incur is a failure to lead a free life.

They put together “businesses” that they can automate and never look at again.

They got into this lifestyle because someone scared them of “deferring” the good life until retirement when they won’t be able to appreciate it anyway. Why wait to live!?

The thing is, now they just want to retire immediately. If they had a White Whale then this wouldn’t be an issue.

Instead of having a dream of creating something amazing, their dream is to work from home (and only four hours per week, please).

This doesn’t seem like a compelling aim for a life’s work.

And it certainly doesn’t invigorate us.

God forbid we do anything hard.

God forbid we try more than what is necessary.

Like dogs chasing a car, we aim at an eternal comfort that, if caught, would destroy us.

A focus on hacking makes everything that requires time and toil look undesirable. Yet those are the prerequisites of the pursuit of anything worthwhile. One cannot catch a whale in a net of hacks.

Hacking Undervalues the Obvious and Useful (But Boring) for the New and Ineffectual (But Sexy)

“People say: ‘What good does it do to point out the obvious?’ A great deal of good; for we sometimes know facts without paying attention to them. Advice is not teaching; it merely engages the attention and rouses us, and concentrates the memory, and keeps it from losing grip. We miss much that is set before our very eyes. Advice is, in fact, a sort of exhortation. The mind often tries not to notice even that which lies before our eyes; we must therefore force upon it the knowledge of things that are perfectly well known.” –Seneca, Moral Letters to Lucilius

Everything needs an exclamation mark to be noticed.

Exclamation marks cost advertising dollars though, which means that timeless, but effective advice off which you can’t make a buck gets lost in the noise. You’re never going to see a Super Bowl ad for broccoli, push-ups, or unguided meditation.

The marketing budget for the next easy fix (pharmaceutical stress reduction pill, fat-loss via berry extracts, liposuction, some new diet), on the other hand, is limitless.

It’s the hacks that get the funding. It’s the next ultimate workout program, magic pharmaceutical invention, or method to instant wealth that you’ll pay for.

It’s slightly more nuanced when scientists or academics are doing the selling.

Universities are under extreme pressure to put out exciting new findings. This pressure is passed on to professors who are forced to do “science by PR.” They exaggerate the implications of their findings in order to sell more books or gain more press.

Big Data allows us to draw correlations between anything we want. Data mining isn’t so much mining as it is finding shapes in clouds.

Sometimes a finding makes it through academia intact. Then the journalists get ahold of it…

A possible solution for 2% increase in solar panel effectiveness becomes The Next Clean Energy Revolution is Here!

Everyone loves sexy science.

But, as a rule of thumb, the newest, most hyped information isn’t the most useful.

What is most useful is rarely hidden away behind a pay wall or some esoteric text. More likely it’s in plain sight, it’s been around for a while, and it’s boring.

But it works.

“Take a simple idea and take it seriously.” –Charlie Munger

Hacking Leads To Aimless Optimization

There is no such thing as a naturally occurring aimless life. Aimlessness happens when too many people have convinced you of the importance of too many aims. Aimlessness isn’t just the absence of an aim, it’s the shadow-side of an aim.

“Indefinite attitudes to the future explain what’s most dysfunctional in our world today. Process trumps substance: when people lack concrete plans to carry out, they use formal rules to assemble a portfolio of various options. This describes Americans today. In middle school, we’re encouraged to start hoarding ‘extracurricular activities.’ In high school, ambitious students compete even harder to appear omnicompetent. By the time a student gets to college, he’s spent a decade curating a bewilderingly diverse résumé to prepare for a completely unknowable future. Come what may, he’s ready — for nothing in particular.” –Peter ThielZero to One: Notes on Startups, or How to Build the Future

Perhaps the greatest productivity “hack” is to become what the billionaire investor Peter Thiel would call a “definite optimist.” That means believing in a concrete future and your ability to create it — or at least a part of it.

Many of us are “indefinite optimists” right now. We believe that the world will be better in the future but have no idea what that means. Thiel uses the finance sector to highlight this attitude: You wouldn’t invest if the future seemed bleak, but you don’t need to have a specific vision for what the future actually looks like.

Scrolling through listicles of productivity advice is an act of indefinite optimism. We collect massive amounts of this low-grade information in hopes that one day it will be useful. We go through these lists every day hoping for the thing without considering the source: some blogger who has to write five more articles that day and is desperate for clicks.

A definite optimist wouldn’t do this. Why?

A definite optimist has a White Whale.

Knowing what you want provides a powerful filter against crappy content. Having a definite aim makes it easier to determine what paths aren’t worth going down.

When we optimize for everything we optimize for nothing.

When we try to optimize for life we get into even bigger trouble.

Those who study productivity the most don’t produce the most.

They have nothing to prepare for. There is no context for them to apply anything.

They have made the mistake of believing that you can optimize life. That if they follow the instructions of some study they will find pure bliss. They will finally escape being human.

Without context all we can see is the web of hacks that we’ve created. The perfect routine, the perfect body, and the perfect bank account: all in service of nothing.

Optimization of productivity is like a multiplier. If there is nothing to multiply, you end up at zero. If you have a definite direction you will naturally optimize over time.

Your definite optimism doesn’t even need to be, well, definite. Nobody can predict the future; the point is to have the courage to do so.

Newton cared more about alchemy and Biblical studies than his famous scientific works. After reading these, John Maynard Keynes said, “Newton was not the first of the age of reason, he was the last of the magicians.”

The specific thing that Newton was driven towards wasn’t what mattered for society in the end. It was still crucially important as the thing that drove Newton to do interesting things. Without his interest in the occult we would not have benefited from his other great work.

Aim doesn’t even need to mean that you think you know what will happen. Nassim Taleb suggests we become antifragile in certain areas of our lives. This means benefitting from (often unexpected) volatility. It means being in a position to win from the unknown. This is a specific aim — one that those who would be “ready for anything” ought to consider.

Hacking Distorts Our View of Time

“Thanks to the clock tower, the rhythms of daily life were now dictated by a machine. Over time, people conformed to ever more precisely scheduled routines. Where the priority of the calendar-driven civilization was God, the priorities of the clockwork universe would be speed and efficiency. Where calendars led people to think in terms of history, clocks led people to think in terms of productivity. Time was money. Only after the proliferation of the clock did the word ‘speed’ (spelled spede) enter the English vocabulary.” –Douglas Rushkoff, Present Shock

We feel so much pressure to hack our lives because of the immense responsibility we (and technology we’ve created) have put on the present moment and the need for immediate success. It’s not acceptable to build a business over a decade, it better be profitable in a week.

You can write a novel in November during NaNoWriMo; why take years to create a masterpiece?

The internet makes sure that you have access to anything the moment it crosses your mind. Your digital devices constantly update with what’s happening now. They whip up a faux sense of urgency that must be witnessed or dealt with.

They are violently bringing you back to the present moment. Compare this to a person “being present.” He is not being shocked into the present by alerts. Instead, he is in control of his attention and places it in the present consciously.

To help understand this difference on a deeper level, it’s worth looking at how the Greeks looked at time. There were two types: chronos and kairos.

Chronos is simple. It’s the time measured by the clock tower. Rushkoff says it’s “what we literally mean when we say ‘three o’clock.’ This is time of the clock, meaning belonging to the clock…”

Chronos is what we’re most comfortable with. It is easily measurable so we can pin it down and work with it. We can gauge how we “use” it to make sure everything is just right.

Kairos is more the qualitative side of time. Being qualitative, it demands the human touch. Rushkoff explains:

[Kairos] is usually understood as a window of opportunity created by circumstances, God, or fate. It is the ideal time to strike, to propose marriage, or to take any particular course of action. Carpe diem.

Hacking or optimizing your life is concerned with chronos because that’s the only thing it can be concerned with. There is no clear way to teach kairos without discussing courage, mindfulness, purpose, and humanity. Chronos is more graspable and moldable: make a chart, set the clock for 45 minutes, don’t take meetings, multitask or don’t multitask, on and on.

Kairos is knowing the right time for you while chronos is knowing the time according to the clock. Kairos is knowing when to go in for the kiss while chronos is concerned with your date being on time. Kairos feels that five years is an acceptable amount of time to make a blog profitable; chronos balks at the idea. Kairos understands context, chronos hungers for infinitely more, infinitely faster.

Our chronos-heavy perspective on time doesn’t just cause anxiety; it makes us weak as humans and keeps us stuck in our current circumstances. Rushkoff says this is because:

“It assumes that kairos has no value — that if there is a moment of opportunity to be seized, that moment will break into our flow from the outside, like a pop-up ad on the Web. We lose the ability to imagine opportunities emerging and excitement arising from pursuing whatever we are currently doing, as we compulsively anticipate the next decision point.”

We wait for the email, the text message, the next comment on our new Facebook profile picture. We scroll through Instagram looking for the motivational image we need.

We don’t know what to do with ourselves if our time isn’t being demanded by automated notifications.

Some like to say that we all have the same 24 hours in a day. You and the President. Sure. For someone stuck in chronos this is true. For someone who understands kairos it’s absurd.

Dependence on Replicating the Ideal, Expert-Recommended Circumstances Before Getting Started

air and light and time and space by Charles Bukowski

“– you know, I’ve either had a family, a job,
something has always been in the
way
but now
I’ve sold my house, I’ve found this
place, a large studio, you should see the space and
the light.
for the first time in my life I’m going to have
a place and the time to
create.”

no baby, if you’re going to create
you’re going to create whether you work
16 hours a day in a coal mine
or
you’re going to create in a small room with 3 children
while you’re on
welfare,
you’re going to create with part of your mind and your body blown
away,
you’re going to create blind
crippled
demented,
you’re going to create with a cat crawling up your
back while
the whole city trembles in earthquake, bombardment,
flood and fire.

baby, air and light and time and space
have nothing to do with it
and don’t create anything
except maybe a longer life to find
new excuses
for.

Stephen King wrote Carrie on a makeshift desk set between a washing machine and a dryer. He wrote while his kid cried and his wife banged pots in the nearby kitchen as she prepared dinner.

This should tell you everything you need to know about the requirements of creativity.

Studies come out and tell you that you need to paint your walls a certain color. That you need to sit down at the same place every day (or a different place every day). That you need this or that. Always contradicting, never taking you into consideration.

These studies are concerned with some measurement on some group of people in some study you weren’t involved in.

If you look at the daily rituals of 100 different creative people you’ll find 100 different things that work. For them.

If you know that you must create, then you will. If you feel like you should create, then you’ll find an excuse not to.

When you must create then you have no choice but to find the best environment and ritual for you. These personal environmental hacks are just that: personal.

You must earn the right to hack your creativity. There is no book that can do it for you. No secret method. Just you, honesty, and an aim.

Keep your locus of control on the inside. Scientific studies will try to convince you that you must have everything just so or you won’t be a genius. They will pull your sense of control outside of you until you forget that you have any at all.

If you do the work you’ll find what works for you. Without the work, no amount of studies will teach you what you want to know.

Hacking Favors Irrational Rationality

Focusing on hacking our lives makes it impossible to discern between irrational rationality and rational irrationality.

Irrational rationality is being reasonable at an unreasonable time. It’s relying on logic when your wife is yelling. It’s coming up with “reasonable” excuses for doing something that feels wrong. And it’s trying to figure out ways to be more productive…at a job you hate. It’s trying to hack the thing when what the issue really demands is courage.

Rational irrationality is being unreasonable at the right times. It’s caring “too much” about some trivial detail. It’s putting all your effort into something that might not work. It’s living with purpose when there is no clear reason to do so. It’s putting aside the hacks in favor of something truly difficult.

Rational irrationality is Newton’s obsession with alchemy. It’s Steve Jobs’ demand that the interior of an Apple device be as beautiful as the exterior. It’s writing a novel that probably won’t be published.

It’s what makes life worth living.

These are the moments when you feel you’re doing the right thing even though it’s confusing or angering everyone else. Your aims and methods would never make it onto a list of “How to Optimize X!” But it’s working for you.

The quality of your life depends on moments of taking the leap when the world is telling you not to. These are the moments that we remember for the rest of our lives.

The health of our economy also depends on rational irrationality.

Silicon Valley was built on “irrational” investments.

It takes an organization that can transcend traditional investment rules (hack for short-term profits) in order to truly push technology. Historically, the military has been the only organization to be able to do this consistently.

The Department of Defense needed boundary-pushing electronics to save lives and protect our freedom. A company aimed at maximizing (read “hacking”) profits could never justify this.

Federal sources accounted for over half of the national R&D expenditures in the twenty-five years leading up to 1978. This was only made possible by the rational irrationality that comes with stakes as high as the Soviets threatening US sovereignty.

Imagine stakes this high in your life. When you’re on a mission you wouldn’t dream of hacking your life — of only doing what’s quick and efficient. You use those necessary hacks that will move you towards your goal, sure, but your mindset is focused on the long adventure ahead.

Joseph Campbell’s hero’s journey describes the pain of “knitting together” your dream world and reality. The hero is the one with enough courage to go beyond rationality (what we know can be brought into reality) and come back with something for our world anyway. It’s painful, but it’s more than worthwhile:

For when a heart insists on its destiny, resisting the general blandishment, then the agony is great; so too the danger. Forces, however, will have been set in motion beyond the reckoning of the senses. Sequences of events from the corners of the world will draw gradually together, and miracles of coincidence bring the inevitable to pass. The talismanic ring from the soul’s encounter with its other portion in the place of recollectedness betokens…a conviction of the waking mind that the reality of the deep is not belied by that of common day. This is the sign of the hero’s requirement, now, to knit together his two worlds.

The remainder…is a history of the slow yet wonderful operation of a destiny that has been summoned into life. Not everyone has a destiny: only the hero who has plunged to touch it, and has come up again — with a ring.”

We have rationalized away most good reasons for caring intensely. Newton’s intense drive to solve the mind of God would be looked at as madness now. It seems there are fewer scientific discoveries that will matter widely and last for more than a decade. It doesn’t seem that any book written this year will be read in 100 years.

The modern hero is the one who has the ability to create meaning.

The hero now is the one who can dig down deep and give a damn for no justifiable reason. His ability to maintain virility in the face of an objective purposelessness serves as an inspiration to those around him. He will certainly find hacks along the way, but would never consider hacking the journey itself.

What’s the point? What is there to do?

hammer

“… the labyrinth is thoroughly known; we have only to follow the thread of the hero-path. And where we had thought to find an abomination, we shall find a god; where we had thought to slay another, we shall slay ourselves; where we had thought to travel outward, we shall come to the center of our own existence; where we had thought to be alone, we shall be with all the world.”

–Joseph Campbell, The Hero With A Thousand Faces

What is the one thing that all the weakening effects of our hacking culture outlined above work to undermine?

Self-reliance.

That’s the heart of the matter.

Focusing on hacking cuts our autonomous legs out from under us. It breeds dependence on expert advice and shortcuts in order to get started and keep moving. It emphasizes new and sexy tips and tricks, while obscuring the simple, obvious advice that could actually save us. It focuses our view on the present, and confuses mere activity with moving towards an ultimate aim. It tells us that obstacles are optional, and that if they are encountered, you can always find a way around them — that only suckers climb mountains when you can take the chairlift.

Counteracting the self-reliance-sapping effects of hacking culture isn’t easy; the very nature of the problem denies any prescription, much less a hackable solution. Still, in relation to the six problems we discussed above, several general principles/stances can be recommended:

  • Maintaining a strong, centered posture even as quick fixes and silver bullets are continually thrown at you, using them only when useful, and embracing the effort that’s needed when they’re not.
  • Focusing on obvious, time-tested advice, and what you have found works for you, rather than being distracted by what’s new and sexy.
  • Having a clear aim and avoiding the temptation to optimize for zero.
  • Remembering kairos and that time is not just what your clock can measure.
  • Valuing your own personal experience over what a study says, and feeling free to do your own experiments.
  • Having the courage to care about what you care about, and to do things your way, whether it makes sense to others or not.

The crux of one’s hacking counter-stance must ultimately rest on the prioritization of right action over abstraction. I say “right action” instead of “action” as a reminder that busyness is worse than doing nothing. It feels productive while your soul shrinks and the important things go left undone.

Perhaps your first action must be to create a whole new approach to life — a new mindset that undoes that which has been ingrained since youth.

When we were in school they gave us problems to solve.

When we got jobs they gave us tasks to complete.

But when we graduated, got fired, fell in love, started businesses, had kids?

There was no absolute right answer.

And so we had to write our own questions.

That’s the hardest thing to do when you’ve spent your whole life finding answers to other peoples’ equations.

The hacking mind is obsessed with answering questions. It makes your life small by forgetting there are other questions out there to ask.

The hacking mind will have you think that your life can be measured and thus optimized. That your existence is something to be charted and cheated.

When you start writing your own questions you can reject this notion.

Instead of googling what to do with your life you can live.

Instead of trying to sleep according to the opinions of some scientists you can go to bed when you want.

Instead of reading a book written by a bad business consultant you can read a novel.

Instead of pretending like you want something you can actually want something.

Instead of learning how to manipulate women you could sack up and talk to one.

In short, you can be you.

You know what you want in life.
You like eating the good stuff.
You like challenging things.
You like taking the long way home from work.
You don’t actually want that car.
You can’t be hacked.

Because hacks are small.

And you are big.

_______________________

Kyle kick-starts entrepreneurs at StartupBros.com and is offering this free guide of necessary entrepreneurial epiphanies to you. Feel freer than free to contact Kyle anywhere on the web. Even his inbox: kyle at StartupBros dot com.


13 Apr 12:08

chubbymon:lordwanjavi:Kerry Callen > A Callen ParodyThese are...

Claudio Navarro Henriquez

That expression on wonderwoman xD

07 Apr 00:36

10 Years of Git: An Interview with Git Creator Linus Torvalds | Linux.com

Claudio Navarro Henriquez

Really interesting interview! I didn't ever know that Linus was the creator of GIT too! nice reading for shure.

Linus-Torvalds-LinuxCon-Europe-2014Ten years ago this week, the Linux kernel community faced a daunting challenge: They could no longer use their revision control system BitKeeper and no other Source Control Management (SCMs) met their needs for a distributed system. Linus Torvalds, the creator of Linux, took the challenge into his own hands and disappeared over the weekend to emerge the following week with Git. Today Git is used for thousands of projects and has ushered in a new level of social coding among programmers.

To celebrate this milestone, we asked Linus to share the behind-the-scenes story of Git and tell us what he thinks of the project and its impact on software development. You'll find his comments in the story below. We'll follow this Q&A with a week of Git in which we profile a different project each day that is using the revision control system. Look for the stories behind KVM, Qt, Drupal, Puppet and Wine, among others. 

Why did you create Git?

Torvalds: I really never wanted to do source control management at all and felt that it was just about the least interesting thing in the computing world (with the possible exception of databases ;^), and I hated all SCM's with a passion. But then BitKeeper came along and really changed the way I viewed source control. BK got most things right and having a local copy of the repository and distributed merging was a big deal. The big thing about distributed source control is that it makes one of the main issues with SCM's go away - the politics around "who can make changes." BK showed that you can avoid that by just giving everybody their own source repository. But BK had its own problems, too; there were a few technical choices that caused problems (renames were painful), but the biggest downside was the fact that since it wasn't open source, there was a lot of people who didn't want to use it. So while we ended up having several core maintainers use BK - it was free to use for open source projects - it never got ubiquitous. So it helped kernel development, but there were still pain points.

That then came to a head when Tridge (Andrew Tridgell) started reverse-engineering the (fairly simply) BK protocol, which was against the usage rules for BK. I spent a few weeks (months? It felt that way) trying to mediate between Tridge and Larry McVoy, but in the end it clearly wasn't working. So at some point I decided that I can't continue using BK, but that I really didn't want to go back to the bad old pre-BK days. Sadly, at the time, while there were some other SCM's that kind of tried to get the whole distributed thing, none of them did it remotely well.  I had performance requirements that were not even remotely satisfied by what was available, and I also worried about integrity of the code and the whole workflow, so I ended up just deciding to write my own.

How did you approach it? Did you stay up all weekend to write it or was it just during regular hours?

Torvalds: Heh. You can actually see how it all took shape in the git source code repository, except for the very first day or so. It took about a day to get to be "self-hosting" so that I could start committing things into git using git itself, so the first day or so is hidden, but everything else is there. The work was clearly mostly during the day, but there's a few midnight entries and a couple of 2 a.m. ones. The most interesting part is how quickly it took shape ; the very first commit in the git tree is not a lot of code, but it already did the basics - enough to commit itself. The trick wasn't really so much the coding but coming up with how it organizes the data.

So I'd like to stress that while it really came together in just about ten days or so (at which point I did my first *kernel* commit using git), it wasn't like it was some kind of mad dash of coding. The actual amount of that early code is actually fairly small, it all depended on getting the basic ideas right. And that I had been mulling over for a while before the whole project started. I'd seen the problems others had. I'd seen what I wanted to avoid doing. 

Has it lived up to your expectations? How is it working today in your estimation? Are there any limitations?

Torvalds: I'm very happy with git. It works remarkably well for the kernel and is still meeting all my expectations. What I find interesting is how it took over so many other projects, too. Surprisingly quickly, in the end. There is a lot of inertia in switching source control systems;  just look at how long CVS and even RCS have stayed around, but at some point git just took over.

Why do you think it's been so widely adopted?

Torvalds: I think that many others had been frustrated by all the same issues that made me hate SCM's, and while there have been many projects that tried to fix one or two small corner cases that drove people wild, there really hadn't been anything like git that really ended up taking on the big problems head on. Even when people don't realize how important that "distributed" part was (and a lot of people were fighting it), once they figure out that it allows those easy and reliable backups, and allows people to make their own private test repositories without having to worry about the politics of having write access to some central repository, they'll never go back.

Does Git last forever, or do you foresee another revision control system in another 10 years? Will you be the one to write it? 

Torvalds: I'm not going to be the one writing it, no. And maybe we'll see something new in ten years, but I guarantee that it will be pretty "git-like." It's not like git got everything right, but it got all the really basic issues right in a way that no other SCM had ever done before.

No false modesty ;)

Why does Git work so well for Linux?

Torvalds: Well, it was obviously designed for our workflow, so that is part of it. I've already mentioned the whole "distributed" part many times, but it bears repeating. But it was also designed to be efficient enough for a biggish project like Linux, and it was designed to do things that people considered "hard" before git - because those are the things *I* do every day.

Just to pick an example: the concept of "merging" was generally considered to be something really quite painful and hard in most SCM's. You'd plan your merges, because they were big deals. That's not acceptable to me, since I commonly do tens of merges a day when in the merge window, and even then, the biggest overhead shouldn't be the merge itself, it should be testing the result. The "git" part of the merge is just a couple of seconds, it should take me much longer just to write the merge explanation message.

So git was basically designed and written for my requirements, and it shows.

People have said that Git is only for super smart people. Even Andrew Morton said Git is "expressly designed to make you feel less intelligent than you thought you were." What's your response to this?

Torvalds: So I think it used to be true but isn't any more. There is a few reasons people feel that way, but I think only one of them remains. The one that remains is fairly simple: "you can do things so many ways."

You can do a lot of things with git, and many of the rules of what you *should* do are not so much technical limitations but are about what works well when working together with other people. So git is a very powerful set of tools, and that can not only be overwhelming at first, it also means that you can often do the same (or similar) things different ways, and they all "work." Generally, the best way to learn git is probably to first only do very basic things and not even look at some of the things you can do until you are familiar and confident about the basics.

There's a few historical reasons for why git was considered complicated. One of them is that it was complicated. The people who started using git very early on in order to work on the kernel really had to learn a very rough set of scripts to make everything work. All the effort had been on making the core technology work and very little on making it easy or obvious. So git (deservedly) had a reputation for requiring you to know exactly what you did early on. But that was mainly true for the first 6 months or a year.

The other big reason people thought git was hard is that git is very different. There are people who used things like CVS for a decade or two, and git is not CVS. Not even close. The concepts are different. The commands are different. Git never even really tried to look like CVS, quite the reverse. And if you've used a CVS-like system for a long time, that makes git appear complicated and needlessly different. People were put off by the odd revision numbers. Why is a git revision not "1.3.1" with nice incrementing numbers like it was in CVS? Why is it that odd scary 40-character HEX number?

But git wasn't "needlessly different." The differences are required. It's just that it made some people really think it was more complicated than it is, because they came from a very different background. The "CVS background" thing is going away. By now there are probably lots of programmers out there who have never used CVS in their lives and would find the CVS way of doing things very confusing, because they learned git first.

Do you think the rate of Linux kernel development would have been able to grow at its current rate without Git? Why or why not?

Torvalds: Well, "without git," sure. But it would have required that somebody else wrote something git-equivalent: a distributed SCM that is as efficient as git is. We definitely needed something *like* git.

What's your latest opinion of GitHub?

Torvalds: Github is an excellent hosting service; I have nothing against it at all. Now, the complaints I've had is that GitHub as a development platform - making commits, pull requests, keeping track of issues etc - doesn't work very well at all. It's not even close, not for something like the kernel. It's much too limited.

That's partly because of how the kernel is developed, but part of it was that the GitHub interfaces were actively encouraging bad behavior. Commits done on GitHub had bad commit messages etc, because the web interfaces at GitHub were actively encouraging bad behavior. They did fix some of that, so it probably works better, but it will never be appropriate for something like the Linux kernel.

What is the most interesting use you've seen for Git and/or GitHub?

Torvalds: I'm just happy that it made it so easy to start a new project. Project hosting used to be painful, and with git and GitHub it's just so trivial to do a random small project. It doesn't matter what the project is; what matters is that you can do it.

Do you have side projects up your sleeve today? Any more brilliant software projects that will dominate software development for years to come?

Torvalds: Nothing planned. But I'll let you know if that changes.

---

Atlassian is also helping to celebrate the anniversary of Git. Click on the image below to take a walk down memory lane. 

AtlassianGit10year

Bookmarked at brandizzi Delicious' sharing tag and expanded by Delicious sharing tag expander.
04 Apr 21:25

tsketchbook:I’ve been having bad days and drawing this helped me...















tsketchbook:

I’ve been having bad days and drawing this helped me remember things.

I hope it helps you, too.

01 Apr 04:00

xkcloud

Claudio Navarro Henriquez

Oh, I see what you did there...well done! :)

07 Aug 11:35

Self Reflection

Claudio Navarro Henriquez

My day in a comic... sad, really :(

Self Reflection
09 Jun 09:31

¿Te quedas sopa en el metro o en el bus? La alarma de Google Now puede ser tu mejor amigo

by Jaime Novoa
Claudio Navarro Henriquez

Mis súplicas han sido escuchadas!

google now

Google Now tiene una nueva funcionalidad que puede resultar muy útil para aquellos que se quedan habitualmente dormidos en el metro o en el autobús, ya sea por causas naturales o por ir un poco contentos de más a altas horas de la madrugada. Se trata de una alarma que podemos configurar desde la propia app y que nos avisará cuando estemos llegando a nuestro destino.

Esta alarma la podemos configurar directamente desde la app de Now y funciona en base al tiempo, evitando así depender de la conexión de datos o GPS. Esto puede suponer una ventaja para aquellos tramos en los que la conexión es limitada, pero también se puede volver en nuestra cuenta si el tren o bus sufre algún retraso.

Esta funcionalidad no está todavía disponible para todos los usuarios de Google Now, aunque se espera que en los próximos días o semanas llegue a la mayoría de terminales Android. En teoría Now será capaz de detectar que estamos utilizando transporte público y mostrará una alarma al lado de las diferentes alternativas de transporte. Una función interesante para los trasnochadores y que es independiente de la alarma convencional que viene preinstalada en los terminales Android.

Vía | Xataka Móvil
Imagen | José Antonio Navas

-
La noticia ¿Te quedas sopa en el metro o en el bus? La alarma de Google Now puede ser tu mejor amigo fue publicada originalmente en Genbeta por Jaime Novoa.


17 May 14:46

Tumblr | 235.png

Claudio Navarro Henriquez

What a way to start a Monday...

235.png
13 May 03:42

Anon is God

Claudio Navarro Henriquez

I-I can't even... *mindfucked* xD

05 May 15:19

mucholderthen: Jacque Fresco, from Zeitgeist: Moving...





















mucholderthen:

Jacque Fresco, from Zeitgeist: Moving Forward 
Via universalequalityisinevitable

poeticdarkbeauty:

who is this brilliant man

s-c-i-guy: 
His name is Jacque Fresco. He’s a futurist and social engineer. He lectures his views on sustainable cities, energy efficiency, natural-resource management, and the role of science in society, while being entirely self-taught. 

He’s also the founder of the Venus Project, an organization that advocates a resource-based economy. The project combines Fresco’s versions of sustainable development, natural resource management, energy efficiency, and advanced automation in a global socioeconomic system based on social cooperation and scientific methodology.

As you can tell he’s a pretty badass dude.

16 Apr 17:41

Tumblr | 8f4.png

Claudio Navarro Henriquez

I can't stop laughing! xD

8f4.png
22 Jan 11:11

Te llevaría 3 horas ver todas las pantallas de inicio de la NES

by Jimmy

Te llevaría aproximadamente 3 horas ver todas las pantallas de inicio de la NES, pero si quieres intentarlo, aquí tienes el vídeo. Seguro que alguna te trae algún recuerdo nostálgico, y a ver si alguno de los lectores se atreve a decir aquello de ‘se han olvidado del juego …‘ en los comentarios.

Vía: Kotaku

22 Jan 11:22

Resuelve crímenes increíbles en tu Android con Layton Brothers: Mistery Room

by David Pérez

Layton Brothers Mystery Room

El estudio desarrollador de videojuegos independiente Level-5 debe su fama, entre otros lanzamientos, a la saga de Profesor Layton: juegos de aventuras de misterio y puzzles que nos meten en la piel de un investigador de diferentes misterios que vio la luz por primera vez en Nintendo DS (para continuar con Nintendo 3DS).

Por suerte los títulos de la saga no se limitan a las plataformas portátiles de Nintendo, y desde el año pasado podemos disfrutar de una nueva entrega de la saga en nuestros dispositivos móviles, ya sean sistemas con Android o un dispositivo con iOS.

El juego del que hablamos hoy es Layton Brothers: Mistery Room, un juego que nos pondrá en la piel de la ayudante de un brillante detective de la unidad más prestigiosa de Scotland Yard y en el que tendremos que llevar ante la justicia a los asesinos que nadie más puede encontrar.

wynRTHX MhjpcBu MIXhtWB WBk83RJ HUEiRZC lMuN1ca JIU1cZR BEDcQFS

Nosotros, en el juego, ocupamos el papel de Lucy Baker: una detective recién llegada a Scotland Yard y que es transferida a la Mistery Room, el hogar para los casos más complicados de resolver. Esta unidad esta comandada por Alfendi Layton, un detective considerado como un genio por conseguir resolver cada caso que se le ponga por delante. Como la joven e inexperta Lucy Baker tendremos que ayudar a resolver los casos que va recibiendo la Mistery Room, todo esto mientras la Lucy Baker actual va relatando la historia desde sus recuerdos.

Para resolver los crímenes podremos examinar la escena del crimen por nosotros mismos gracias a un aparato en la Mistery Room que nos permitirá ver todos los detalles. Una vez tengamos todos los testimonios y hayamos examinado la escena del crimen, podremos empezar a resolver las incógnitas que haya dejado el crimen a su paso con toda la información que tengamos. Y, por último y cuando sepamos con certeza la identidad del asesino, podremos someterle a un interrogatorio en el que demostrar que es el verdadero culpable.

Ver el vídeo

El juego cuenta con varios casos, siendo el primero y el segundo (junto al prólogo) gratuitos y estando hasta el noveno caso disponible por compras dentro de la aplicación. Los primeros casos son perfectos para habituarse a la dinámica del juego (y dejarnos con muchas ganas de más), mientras que el resto de casos nos sumergen en una historia mucho más profunda. Todo ello acompañados de la chispa que da la inexperiencia de Lucy Baker y el talante que Alfendi Layton utiliza.

Si te gustan las aventuras gráficas y los puzzles (en inglés), este juego te va a encantar: trae lo mejor de cada género concentrados en casos en los que tendremos que comernos la cabeza para contestar a las incógnitas y dar con el verdadero asesino. Si te gustan los capítulos que vienen gratis con el juego te recomiendo pagar los capítulos extra, valen mucho la pena y nos dan la oportunidad de disfrutar mucho más con este spin-off de la saga.

Aplicación en Google Play

El artículo Resuelve crímenes increíbles en tu Android con Layton Brothers: Mistery Room se publicó en El Androide Libre (El Blog Android de referencia. Aplicaciones, noticias, Juegos y smartphones Android Libres)








21 Jan 18:00

Joystiq Streams: The Banner Saga

by Jessica Conditt
Sure, we already have Game of Thrones, The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings and countless other epic fantasies in which to get lost - but there's always room for more. There's especially always room for an epic, hand-painted, Viking fantasy RPG ...
20 Jan 20:00

142. TIMOTHY FERRISS: Someday

by Gav

142. TIMOTHY FERRISS: Someday

Timothy Ferriss is an author, entrepreneur, blogger and television host. He’s best known as the 4-Hour guru who helped pioneer the ‘lifestyle design’ movement. This quote is taken from Ferriss’ first book, The 4-Hour Workweek, which I read when I was in the middle of my career change and helped motivate me to eventually start this website. The book teaches people to rethink the outdated idea of working a 9-5 job and to use today’s technology to find the perfect work/life balance.

Ferriss recently debuted his new TV show, The Tim Ferriss Experiment, where he applies his life-hacking rules to a number of different disciplines.

I was fortunate enough to meet Tim and contribute some illustrations to his latest book, The 4-Hour Chef. Here’s a blog post I wrote about it with some behind-the-scenes sketches.

RELATED COMICS Chris Guillebeau: 11 Ways to be Average. Terence McKenna: Nature Loves Courage.

- Zen Pencils was named one of PCMag’s top 100 websites of 2013!
- Yay, it’s finally the first comic of 2014. It’s taken me longer than I had planned to update the site again, but I’m happy to say my holiday really energised me for the year to come and I’ve already got a couple months worth of ideas for comics that I can’t wait to start drawing. Thanks for your patience.

15 Jan 01:02

Photo

Claudio Navarro Henriquez

This happened to me, just like that, on a restaurant in some hotel in Las Vegas! xD





















15 Jan 01:00

How to Sync Your Saved PC Games Between Computers with Dropbox

by Whitson Gordon

Wouldn't it be great if you could start playing a game on one computer, save it, then pick up where you left off on another computer? Here's how to sync all your game saves with Dropbox.

Read more...


    






15 Jan 15:20

Final Fantasy VI, uno de los mejores juegos de rol de la Historia llega a Android

by Adrian Raya

final-fantasy-vi-1

¿Qué podemos decir de la saga Final Fantasy que no hayamos dicho ya? Se trata de una de las sagas de JRPGs mas famosas que existen, con cada una de sus entregas atrayendo a un gran número de aficionados. Pero pese a que todas ellas son importantes, hay algunas que ocupan un lugar mas importante en el corazón de los jugadores. Para algunos es la séptima entrega, para otros es la octava, para algunos la quinta y para otros la décima. Y luego está Final Fantasy VI.

Una historia que te marcará

final-fantasy-vi-2

Antes que nada, un inciso; para el que escribe, Final Fantasy VI es uno de los mejores juegos de la historia, y el mejor de los FF. Razones, hay muchas, aunque tal vez sea la historia y el desarrollo de los personajes lo que realmente me conmovió. Nuestro viaje empieza en el nevado pueblo de Narshe, con una chica conocida simplemente como Terra que está siendo controlada por el Imperio en busca de seres mágicos llamados espers. Su amnesia y su pasado formarán parte integral del argumento, aunque lo mismo puede decirse de cualquier personaje que se una a nuestro grupo. Todos ellos tienen su propia historia, sus propios motivos para luchar y sus propios momentos importantes en la trama. De hecho, podría decirse que en FF VI no hay un protagonista claro, sino que todos los personajes lo son.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DXUKWzcy33M">Ver el vídeo

Por tanto, este es un juego en el que vas a leer, y mucho, pero el guión está bien escrito y las relaciones entre los personajes están bien planteadas, así que en ningún momento es una molestia. Conforme avances en el juego vivirás escenas míticas, algunas que te romperán el corazón, y otras que te harán anhelar aún mas. La música del maestro Nobuo Uematsu es vital en este sentido, con uno de los mejores trabajos de su carrera.

Batallas al mas puro estilo Final Fantasy

final-fantasy-vi-3

Jugablemente, Final Fantasy VI conserva la división entre la exploración de ciudades, el mundo, y las mazmorras; y el combate en sí. Este sigue usando el sistema ATB, que consiste en que cada personaje solo podrá actuar una vez que su barra personal se rellene (dependiendo de su velocidad); un sistema de combate por turnos que se camufla en el tiempo real. Esta versión para Android incluye un nuevo diseño de menús mas adecuado para pantallas táctiles, por lo que el control no debería suponer un problema.

final-fantasy-vi-6

La diferencia entre los personajes también llega al combate, ya que cada uno cuenta con habilidades únicas que debemos tener en cuenta a la hora de crear nuestro grupo. Sin embargo, también podremos personalizarlos como queramos, asociándolos a espers que nos darán acceso a magias e invocaciones, o bien configurando las armas, armaduras y accesorios que llevarán.

Gráficos polémicos

final-fantasy-vi-5

Tal vez el elemento mas polémico de Final Fantasy VI para Android sea su aspecto gráfico. El juego original fue lanzado en Super Nintendo, siendo uno de los títulos que mejor aprovechaba su potencia para mostrar gráficos muy detallados en 2D. Sin embargo, seguramente por motivos de resolución de pantalla, esta versión para Android no usa los gráficos originales, si bien hay que agradecer que sigan siendo en 2D y no en 3D como entregas anteriores. Si esto es apropiado o no deberá decidirlo cada aficionado, pero no cabe duda de que el juego no tiene tan buen aspecto como el original, algo extraño si pensamos en ello.

final-fantasy-vi-4

Final Fantasy VI para Android es uno de los mejores juegos de rol al estilo japonés que vas a encontrar en cualquier catálogo. Su historia, su música y su sistema de batalla lo convirtieron en un clásico que ahora está disponible allá a donde vayamos.

Aplicación en Google Play

El artículo Final Fantasy VI, uno de los mejores juegos de rol de la Historia llega a Android se publicó en El Androide Libre (El Blog Android de referencia. Aplicaciones, noticias, Juegos y smartphones Android Libres)








30 Dec 17:30

The Stylish Way To Play Your NES

by Steve Marinconz

The Stylish Way To Play Your NES

Dave Nunez sure likes 3D printing stuff, and his latest project was no small undertaking. Inspired by his desk lamp and a pile of spare parts, he came up with the design for this 'NESPoise' system, and it sure is pretty.

Read more...


    






09 Sep 23:59

What Does It Mean to Be a Man? 80+ Quotes on Men & Manhood

by Brett & Kate McKay

When putting together our two paperback books, we sought to pepper the text in each with quotes about men and manhood. What we quickly discovered was that no comprehensive source for such quotes existed. You could find a few on general quote collection sites, a smattering on other websites, and some in books. But there was no repository that brought them all together. I finally decided to create such a collection myself, and below you will find the result.

When it comes to quotes about manhood, you could conceivably include ones that touch on the different qualities of manhood, i.e., quotes on courage, strength, resolution, etc. But what we have aimed to do here is to limit the collection to quotes that reference manhood itself. We hope you enjoy the quotes and perhaps find a few that will illuminate the meaning of manliness and encourage you to embody it.

Day16

“To have done no man a wrong…to walk and live, unseduced, within arm’s length of what is not your own, with nothing between your desire and its gratification but the invisible law of rectitude—this is to be a man.” Orison Swett Marden

“You have to be a man before you can be a gentleman.” –John Wayne (McLintock!)

Day11

“Because there is very little honor left in American life, there is a certain built-in tendency to destroy masculinity in American men.” Norman Mailer

“A male was transformed into a man by the willful expenditure of energy. Above all, a man willed himself to be expendable. Like the sun, a man fed the fire of his honor on his own substance. The magnus animus, the animus virilis, squandered itself in contempt of its own dear life.” Carlin A. Barton

Day24

“He understood well enough how a man with a choice between pride and responsibility will almost always choose pride—if responsibility robs him of his manhood.” –Stephen King

“There is a constantly reoccurring notion that real manhood is different from simple anatomical maleness, that it is not a natural condition that comes about spontaneously through biological maturation but rather is a precarious or artificial state that boys must win against powerful odds. This recurrent notion that manhood is problematic, a critical threshold that boys must pass through testing, is found at all levels of sociocultural development regardless of what other alternative roles are recognized.” David Gilmore

Day3

“A man’s ledger does not tell what he is, or what he is worth. Count what is in man, not what is on him, if you would know what he is worth—whether rich or poor.” –Henry Ward Beecher

“We do not admire the man of timid peace. We admire the man who embodies victorious effort; the man who never wrongs his neighbor, who is prompt to help a friend, but who has those virile qualities necessary to win in the stern strife of actual life.” –Theodore Roosevelt

Day17

“The major break in the understanding of manliness is not between, say, the nineteenth century and any particular preceding era but between my generation of Baby Boomers and the entire proceeding complex of teachings. In some ways, TR and Churchill have more in common with Homer and Shakespeare than they do with us.” –Waller Newell

“Contemporaries appreciate the man rather than the merit; but posterity will regard the merit rather than the man.” –Charles Caleb Colton

Day4

“It is not what he has, or even what he does which expresses the worth of a man, but what he is.” –Henri-Frédéric Amiel

“Relieved of moral pretense and stripped of folk costumes, the raw masculinity that all men know in their gut has to do with being good at being a man within a small, embattled gang of men struggling to survive.” –Jack Donovan

mailer

“Who—only let him be a man and intent upon honor—is not eager for the honorable ordeal and prompt to assume perilous duties? To what energetic man is not idleness a punishment?” –Seneca

“Private and public life are subject to the same rules—truth and manliness are two qualities that will carry you through this world much better than policy or tact of expediency or other words that were devised to conceal a deviation from a straight line.” –Robert E. Lee

Day7

“Men have discovered their distinctive virtues and vices through grappling with the perennial dilemmas and demands of love, courage, pride, family, and country—the five paths whose proper ordering gives us the key to the secret of happiness for a man.” –Waller Newell

“It is of dangerous consequence to represent to man how near he is to the level of beasts, without showing him at the same time his greatness. It is likewise dangerous to let him see his greatness without his meanness. It is more dangerous yet to leave him ignorant of either; but very beneficial that he should be made sensible of both.” –Blaise Pascal

Day6

“The longer I live, the more I am certain that the great difference between men—between the feeble and the powerful, the great and the insignificant—is energy, invincible determination—a purpose once fixed, and then—death or victory! That quality will do anything that can be done in this world, and no talents, no circumstances, no opportunities, will make a two-legged creature a man without it.” –Sir Thomas Fowell Buxton

“We don’t need to reinvent manliness. We only need to will ourselves to wake up from the bad dream of the last few generations and reclaim it, in order to extend and enrich that tradition under the formidable demands of the present.” –Waller R. Newell

Day22

“The way of a superior man is three-fold: virtuous, he is free from anxieties; wise, he is free from perplexities; bold, he is free from fear.” –Confucius

“How poor, how rich, how abject, how august, how complicate, how wonderful is man! Distinguished link in being’s endless chain! Midway from nothing to the Deity! Dim miniature of greatness absolute! An heir of glory! A frail child of dust! Helpless immortal! Insect infinite! A worm! A God!” –Edward Young

Day31

“This is the test of your manhood: How much is there left in you after you have lost everything outside of yourself?” –Orison Swett Marden

“For the man who makes everything that leads to happiness, or near to it, to depend upon himself, and not upon other men … has adopted the very best plan for living happily. This is the man of moderation; this is the man of manly character and of wisdom.” –Plato

Day2

“Civilization comes at a cost of manliness. It comes at a cost of wildness, of risk, of strife. It comes at a cost of strength, of courage, of mastery. It comes at a cost of honor. Increased civilization exacts a toll of virility, forcing manliness into further redoubts of vicariousness and abstraction.” –Jack Donovan

“If unwilling to rise in the morning, say to thyself, ‘I awake to do the work of a man.’” –Marcus Aurelius

Day25

“Manhood is the defeat of childhood narcissism.” –David Gilmore

“What a man knows should find its expression in what he does. The value of superior knowledge is chiefly in that it leads to a performing manhood.” –Christian Nestell Bovee

Day28

“Strength, Courage, Mastery, and Honor are the alpha virtues of men all over the world. They are the fundamental virtues of men because without them, no ‘higher’ virtues can be entertained. You need to be alive to philosophize. You can add to these virtues and you can create rules and moral codes to govern them, but if you remove them from the equation altogether you aren’t just leaving behind the virtues that are specific to men, you are abandoning the virtues that make civilization possible.” –Jack Donovan

coleridge

“Manliness means perfect manhood, as womanliness implies perfect womanhood. Manliness is the character of a man as he ought to be, as he was meant to be.” –James Freeman Clarke

“The amiable is a duty most certainly, but must not be exercised at the expense of any of the virtues. He who seeks to do the amiable always, can only be successful at the frequent expense of his manhood.” –W.G. Simms

Day12

“Here is the manliness of manhood, that a man has a good reason for what he does, and has a will in doing it.” –Alexander MacLaren.

“…the samurai ethic is a political science of the heart, designed to control such discouragement and fatigue in order to avoid showing them to others. It was thought more important to look healthy than to be healthy, and more important to seem bold and daring than to be so. This view of morality, since it is physiologically based on the special vanity peculiar to men, is perhaps the supreme male view of morality.”
–Yukio Mishima

Day29

“What a piece of work is a man! How noble in reason! How infinite in faculties! In form and moving, how express and admirable! In action, how like an angel! In apprehension, how like a God.” –Shakespeare

“A man’s got to have a code, a creed to live by, no matter his job.” –John Wayne

Day9

“A man is one whose body has been trained to be the ready servant of his mind; whose passions are trained to be the servants of his will; who enjoys the beautiful, loves truth, hates wrong, loves to do good, and respects others as himself.” –John Ruskin

“Isao had never felt that he might want to be a woman. He had never wished for anything else but to be a man, live in a manly way, die a manly death. To be thus a man was to give constant proof of one’s manliness–to be more a man today than yesterday, more a man tomorrow than today. To be a man was to forge ever upward toward the peak of manhood, there to die amid the white snows of that peak.” –Yukio Mishima

Day14

“When men evaluate each other as men, they still look for the same virtues that they’d need to keep the perimeter. Men respond to and admire the qualities that would make men useful and dependable in an emergency. Men have always had a role apart, and they still judge one another according to the demands of that role as a guardian in a gang struggling for survival against encroaching doom. Everything that is specifically about being a man—not merely a person—has to do with that role.” –Jack Donovan

Day8

“It is not the situation which makes the man, but the man who makes the situation.” Frederick William Robertson

“The test of every religious, political, or educational system is the man which it forms.” –Henri-Frédéric Amiel

Day5

“Men cannot be men—much less good or heroic men—unless their actions have meaningful consequences to people they truly care about. Strength requires an opposing force, courage requires risk, mastery requires hard work, honor requires accountability to other men. Without these things, we are little more than boys playing at being men, and there is no weekend retreat or mantra or half-assed rite of passage that can change that. A rite of passage must reflect a real change in status and responsibility for it to be anything more than theater. No reimagined manhood of convenience can hold its head high so long as the earth remains the tomb of our ancestors.” –Jack Donovan

Day13

“The search after the great men is the dream of youth and the most serious occupation of manhood.” –Ralph Waldo Emerson

“In the meanest are all the materials of manhood, only they are not rightly disposed.” –Henry David Thoreau

Day19

“Stand true to your calling to be a man. Real women will always be relieved and grateful when men are willing to be men.” –Elisabeth Elliott

“A man should be able to hear, and to bear, the worst that could be said of him.” –Saul Bellow

Day20

“The chief constituents of what we call manhood, are moral rather than intellectual.” –J. S. Kieffer

“There are two questions a man must ask himself: The first is ‘Where am I going?’ and the second is ‘Who will go with me?’ If you ever get these questions in the wrong order you are in trouble.” –Sam Keen

Day23

“A woman simply is, but a man must become. Masculinity is risky and elusive. It is achieved by a revolt from woman, and it confirmed only by other men. Manhood coerced into sensitivity is no manhood at all.” –Camille Paglia

“Adversity toughens manhood, and the characteristic of the good or the great man is not that he has been exempt from the evils of life, but that he has surmounted them.” –Patrick Henry

Day15

“Men of ideas and men of action have much to learn from each other, and the truly great are men of both action and abstraction.” –Jack Donovan

“It is a grand mistake to think of being great without goodness; and I pronounce it as certain, that there never was yet a truly great man, that was not at the same time truly virtuous.” –Benjamin Franklin

Day1

“[the difference between the old and the new education being] in a word, the old was a kind of propagation—men transmitting manhood to men; the new is merely propaganda.” –C.S. Lewis

“There is a difference between being a good man and being good at being a man.” –Jack Donovan

Day18

“History is strewn with the wrecks of nations which have gained a little progressiveness at the cost of a great deal of hard manliness, and have thus prepared themselves for destruction as soon as the movements of the world have a chance for it.” –Walter Bagehot

Life is too short to be little. Man is never so manly as when he feels deeply, acts boldly, and expresses himself with frankness and with fervor.” –Benjamin Disraeli

Day27

“It is very sad for a man to make himself servant to a single thing; his manhood all taken out of him by the hydraulic pressure of excessive business. I should not like to be merely a doctor, a great lawyer, a great minister, a great politician. I should like to be, also, something of a man.” –Theodore Parker

“The man who is deserving the name is the one whose thoughts and exertions are for others rather than for himself.” –Walter Scott

Day30

“When someone tells a man to be a man, they mean that there is a way to be a man. A man is not just a thing to be—it is also a way to be, a path to follow and a way to walk. Some try to make manhood mean everything. Others believe that it means nothing at all. Being good at being a man can’t mean everything, and it has always meant something.” –Jack Donovan

Day21

 

What are your favorites in the list? Do you know of another quote about men and manhood that should be included in this collection? Share it in the comments and if it’s worthy, we’ll add it in!

 


    






08 Sep 03:28

Curso de programación básica para Android GRATIS

by Juanguis
Claudio Navarro Henriquez

Interesante, para ver después.

Como veo que los cursos gratuitos sobre programación y diseño web están siendo muy bienvenidos por todos los lectores, en esta ocasión quiero aprovechar para dejarles un nuevo curso gratuito sobre Android, especialmente destinado a los que no tienen muchos conocimientos de programación de aplicaciones para este sistema operativo.

Curso de Android

El curso está dictado por Aythami Mendoza García a través de Cursopedia. y está dirigido principalmente a personas con conocimientos mínimos de programación y que quieran adentrarse en la plataforma Android. Para el curso usarán el entorno de desarrollo Eclipse, y en el mismo está explicado claramente todo el proceso.

Curso de Android – Nivel Básico

Lección 1 – Instalación del SDK
Lección 2 – Crear nuestra primera aplicación – Eclipse
Lección 3 – Tour por el entorno de desarrollo Eclipse
Lección 4 – Primeros pasos para crear una aplicación
Lección 5 – Creación de listas simples
Lección 6 – Creación de menús
Lección 7 – Creación de listas personalizadas
Lección 8 – Acceso mediante el menú
Lección 9 – Actividades con variables entre vistas
Lección 10 – Publicar en la Google Play

Este artículo Curso de programación básica para Android GRATIS fue publicado originalmente en Punto Geek.