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21 Nov 14:05

Great Job, Internet!: Neil DeGrasse Tyson is okay with the ending of Interstellar

by Caroline Siede

This post and video contain major plot details from Interstellar.

Renowned astrophysicist Neil DeGrasse Tyson has earned a reputation for “ruining” movies by pointing out their scientific inaccuracies. His complaints previously motivated James Cameron to change an incorrect star field for Titanic’s rerelease. He also took to Twitter to nitpick the various scientific errors in Gravity. (Although, strangely, he has no problems with the movie Deep Impact.) While Tyson again took to Twitter to “review” Christopher Nolan’s space epic, Interstellar, he was fairly gentle on the sci-fi flick. And now he’s coming out in defense of the film’s high-concept ending in a new video for Business Insider.

At the film’s end, Cooper (Matthew McConaughey) travels into a black hole and winds up in a mysterious “Tesseract” that essentially gives him windows to his daughter’s childhood. From there Coop is able to manipulate gravity to ...

18 Nov 17:00

Video: The ‘Interstellar’ Ending Explained by Neil deGrasse Tyson

by Germain Lussier

Interstellar ending explained

Major Spoilers For Interstellar

The finale of Interstellar has been quite a point of contention among film fans. Some intrinsically understand and decipher what Matthew McConaughey‘s character, Coop, experiences. Others are just totally in the dark and can’t grasp what’s happening once he goes into the black hole. And a very few actually know exactly what’s going on. No matter what, it would be nice to understand exactly what is happening once Coop begins floating around at the end of the film.

Enter Neil deGrasse Tyson, who has already had lots of interesting things to say about Christopher Nolan‘s film. In a new video, he explains how the five dimensions needed to understand the ending of Interstellar work in very plain, simple English. Watch the Interstellar ending explained by Neil deGrasse Tyson below.

Thanks to Business Insider for this great video.

Interstellar Ending Explained

So you’ve watched the video, but how specifically does it relate to Interstellar? Once Coop shows up in the center of the black hole, he’s experiencing five dimensions. The three dimension of space, one dimension of time (all of which deGrasse Tyson explains above) and then a mysterious fifth dimension. That fifth dimension is not comprehensible except in the fact that, once you reach it, time becomes a spacial dimension like the first three. So now that time is something you can travel into and through, Coop has the ability to contact Murp in the past, to change her future.

Admittedly, all of this is only theoretical because, like deGrasse Tyson says, we don’t know what happens in a black hole, let alone if a humanity eons more advanced than us could ever make an event like this possible. Plus, even if being in a higher dimension made time a spacial dimension, deGrasse Tyson believes you wouldn’t be able to change it. Coop can and does. So this isn’t some kind of swiss watch. But it’s still incredibly interesting.

Does that make more sense?

The post Video: The ‘Interstellar’ Ending Explained by Neil deGrasse Tyson appeared first on /Film.

20 Nov 21:00

thefrogman: [video]

21 Nov 13:40

The Red Baron flies again! Man spends £50,000 building himself an exact working replica of the German pilot's Fokker triplane

  • Paul Ford, 52, spent five years on his DIY replica inside an old factory in his in-laws' garden in Cambridgeshire
  • All 320 Fokker Dr1 Dreideckers have been destroyed or lost, so he had to base it on 1970s U.S. technical drawings
  • Mr Ford is no ordinary enthusiast - he spent 26 years at Cambridge University and entered BBC hit show Robot Wars
  • He narrowly avoided death when he crashed it last year, but rebuilt plane and made sure it passed safety checks
  • 'It was very scary the first time I flew it,' the hobbyist admitted. 'But after the first time they're just so much fun to fly'

A plane-mad engineer has spent five years and £50,000 building a perfect replica of the Red Baron's Fokker triplane - and is still flying it despite coming close to death in a crash.

Paul Ford used his wife's patience, his in-laws' garden and his three children's help to recreate the Fokker Dr1 Dreidecker, a First World War fighter made famous by German pilot Manfred Von Richthofen.

Nicknamed 'The Red Baron' for his penchant for painting his aircraft scarlet, Von Richthofen downed at least 70 allied pilots until his death in aerial combat aged 25 a few months before the war ended in 1918.

Scroll down for video 

Now that's a model plane: Paul Ford, 52, spent five years and £50,000 creating his working replica of the Fokker Dr1 Dreidecker. The German First World War fighter was made famous by Manfred Von Richthofen, aka the Red Baron, who shot down 70 allied pilots

Now that's a model plane: Paul Ford, 52, spent five years and £50,000 creating his working replica of the Fokker Dr1 Dreidecker. The German First World War fighter was made famous by Manfred Von Richthofen, aka the Red Baron, who shot down 70 allied pilots

Those magnificent men: Instead of converting an existing craft, Mr Ford created his Fokker triplane from scratch - and it is back in the skies after one of the wing struts was broken in a crash last year. Each part was hand-crafted by the Cambridge engineer's friends

Those magnificent men: Instead of converting an existing craft, Mr Ford created his Fokker triplane from scratch - and it is back in the skies after one of the wing struts was broken in a crash last year. Each part was hand-crafted by the Cambridge engineer's friends

Impressive: With the help of friends and his three children - Ashley, 25, Kirsty, 20, and Michael, 17- Mr Ford's Fokker had its first test flight six years ago and built up a reputation at British air shows, where it flies replica dogfights with an original Tiger Moth

Impressive: With the help of friends and his three children - Ashley, 25, Kirsty, 20, and Michael, 17- Mr Ford's Fokker had its first test flight six years ago and built up a reputation at British air shows, where it flies replica dogfights with an original Tiger Moth

Jaunt: The assistant at Derby Aero Club in his fully-functional replica. His madcap project took 3,500 hours and began 15 years ago, when he built a radio-controlled quarter-size model of the Red Baron's scarlet craft - but he said: 'I had to have the real thing'

Jaunt: The assistant at Derby Aero Club in his fully-functional replica. His madcap project took 3,500 hours and began 15 years ago, when he built a radio-controlled quarter-size model of the Red Baron's scarlet craft - but he said: 'I had to have the real thing'

The 52-year-old co-owner of Derby Aero Club has been obsessed with vintage planes since he became an 11-year-old volunteer at Duxford Airfield in Cambridgeshire, now home to the Imperial War Museum.

The triplane is his crowning achievement and his full-time career - delighting air show crowds across Britain in mock dogfights with a vintage Tiger Moth.

'It is the ultimate plane from the First World War,' he said. 'My wife, Sarah didn't believe I'd do it until one day when the metal and the wood arrived at the front door.'

His madcap project took 3,500 hours and began 15 years ago, when he built a radio-controlled quarter-size model of the Red Baron's scarlet craft.

'I wasn't satisfied', he said. 'I had to have the real thing'.

So to the bemusement of his 50-year-old wife, he bought a book called How to Build a WW1 Replica AND Stay Married! and began work on the Fokker in his in-laws' garden in the village of Cottenham, Cambridgeshire.

'Ironically my wife had time to read it but I didn't,' he said. 'I was too busy working on the plane'.

Challenge: To the bemusement of his 50-year-old wife, Mr Ford bought a book called How to Build a WW1 Replica AND Stay Married! and began work on the Fokker in his in-laws' garden in the village of Cottenham, Cambridgeshire. It had its first test flight six years ago

Challenge: To the bemusement of his 50-year-old wife, Mr Ford bought a book called How to Build a WW1 Replica AND Stay Married! and began work on the Fokker in his in-laws' garden in the village of Cottenham, Cambridgeshire. It had its first test flight six years ago

Unfamiliar sight: The Fokker Dr1 Dreidecker, of which only 320 were built and none survive, was a favourite of the feared Red Baron

Unfamiliar sight: The Fokker Dr1 Dreidecker, of which only 320 were built and none survive, was a favourite of the feared Red Baron

Meticulous: The plane had to be based on 1970s technical drawings by a U.S. enthusiast in order to pass strict safety tests by authorities

Meticulous: The plane had to be based on 1970s technical drawings by a U.S. enthusiast in order to pass strict safety tests by authorities

Mr Ford added: 'I was very lucky. Sarah's parents lived in a very old Victorian house and in the garden there was an old basket-waving factory from the 1800s so we used that. Most of it was built in there'.

The challenge was not easy. All 320 Fokker Dr1 Dreideckers have been destroyed or lost, and many surviving photos were grainy at best.

If there had been a fire I wouldn't be here. One of the wing struts was broken and it took a year to rebuild

Paul Ford on crashing the Fokker

So Mr Ford, from Egginton, South Derbyshire, used technical drawings created in the 1970s by aviation fanatic Ron Sands, a U.S. engineer who drew up detailed plans for many wartime planes.

It meant converting many imperial measurements into metric ones and hand-making the parts, but without the drawings the plane would never have been cleared to fly by the Light Aircraft Association.

With the help of friends and Mr Ford's three children - Ashley, 25, Kirsty, 20, and Michael, 17- the Fokker had its first test flight six years ago and built up a reputation at air shows, where it flies replica dogfights with an original Tiger Moth.

But a year ago, Mr Ford crashed the plane on the grass runway of Podington Airfield in Northamptonshire - narrowly avoiding death.

'I had a little accident', he admitted.

'The trouble with First World War planes is they have to be landed into the wind. Unfortunately a gust of wind caught me sideways, the wing clipped a gate and I landed on my back.

'If there had been a fire I wouldn't be here. One of the wing struts was broken and it took a year to rebuild. We've only just got it flying again.'

View from the cockpit: Mr Ford spent 26 years developing gas turbines in Cambridge University's engineering department - despite not having a degree - before making Mortis, one of the most celebrated entrants to the BBC's hit geeks' battleground show Robot Wars

View from the cockpit: Mr Ford spent 26 years developing gas turbines in Cambridge University's engineering department - despite not having a degree - before making Mortis, one of the most celebrated entrants to the BBC's hit geeks' battleground show Robot Wars

Detailed: Everything on the plane is as it would be except for the engine. These three 'cylinders' are actually old fire extinguishers
Detailed: Everything on the plane is as it would be except for the engine. These three 'cylinders' are actually old fire extinguishers

Detailed: Everything on the plane is as it would be except for the engine. These three 'cylinders' are actually old fire extinguishers

Transported in time: Mr Ford wears a vintage-style flying helmet to complete the look. 'It was very scary the first time I flew it,' he admitted. 'Having built it myself I was a little bit nervous - you always are. But after the first time they're just so much fun to fly'

Transported in time: Mr Ford wears a vintage-style flying helmet to complete the look. 'It was very scary the first time I flew it,' he admitted. 'Having built it myself I was a little bit nervous - you always are. But after the first time they're just so much fun to fly'

Defiant: Mr Ford continues flying despite a crash last year. 'If there had been a fire I wouldn't be here,' he said. 'It took a year to rebuild'

Defiant: Mr Ford continues flying despite a crash last year. 'If there had been a fire I wouldn't be here,' he said. 'It took a year to rebuild'

To this day, the only part of the plane which wouldn't have been the same in 1918 is the engine. Instead of a rotary engine it is a U.S.-made Lycoming which allows him to fly for up to four hours.

To complete the look there is a dummy engine - little more than three old fire extinguishers painted silver - and machine guns on the nose, unarmed of course.

Mr Ford is no ordinary hobbyist.

He spent 26 years developing gas turbines in Cambridge University's engineering department - despite not having a degree.

With talented colleagues there he made Mortis, one of the most famous, fearsome and expensive entrants ever to the BBC's hit show Robot Wars.

He then quit to run his own company which worked on military jet engines, where he spent ten years.

Unlike similar lookalikes which modified an existing plane, the Fokker was completely built from scratch. 

Clunky: The plane is a little unstable, but its creator said it helped improve manoeuvrability in a high-octane (imitation) dogfight

Clunky: The plane is a little unstable, but its creator said it helped improve manoeuvrability in a high-octane (imitation) dogfight

Everything thought of: The plane's labels are in German and weights in kilograms - the latter was a problem when using American plans

Everything thought of: The plane's labels are in German and weights in kilograms - the latter was a problem when using American plans

Taking aim: The plane has a vintage machine gun, though of course an unarmed one, for its travels over airshows across Britain

Taking aim: The plane has a vintage machine gun, though of course an unarmed one, for its travels over airshows across Britain

Crowning achievement: While building the plane, the engineer bought a book called How to Build a WW1 Replica AND Stay Married! 'Ironically my wife had time to read it but I didn't,' he said. 'I was too busy working on the plane' - which now flies triumphant over Britain

Crowning achievement: While building the plane, the engineer bought a book called How to Build a WW1 Replica AND Stay Married! 'Ironically my wife had time to read it but I didn't,' he said. 'I was too busy working on the plane' - which now flies triumphant over Britain

'There are a few other planes that are quite similar to this one but the Fokker just stood out to me,' Mr Ford said. 'It can be a little unstable when flying it but that's what makes it so special.

'It's actually unstable on purpose because it means when it's in the air it can get out of the way very, very quickly and back on your opponent's tail in a dog-fighting situation.

'It was very scary the first time I flew it. Having built it myself I was a little bit nervous - you always are. But after the first time they're just so much fun to fly.'

The Red Baron's is not the first plane Paul has built. He is currently working on two other projects inspired by German First World War planes which he hopes to have finished by next year. Once they are completed, he intends to begin work on a British plane.

Paul, who thanked several devoted friends and family members including his wife for their help, said: 'They cost around £50,000 to make, but they're worth a lot more. The tri-plane is worth around £180,000, but I won't sell any of them.

'They're a lot of fun, and they'll keep me busy when I retire.' 

FIGHTER ACE FEARED BY BRITS: HOW THE RED BARON FOUND INFAMY IN A NEW WAR OF AERIAL COMBAT

The achievements of fighter ace Baron Manfred von Richthofen (right) - who shot down some 70 allied pilots in the First World War - made him hated by the Brits and a propaganda tool for the Germans.

He was 22 and stationed on Germany's eastern border when the war broke out in 1914, but it was not always guaranteed he would become a pilot.

At first he was a cavalryman, but his unit became rapidly obsolete in what would be the world's first modern mechanised war.

In May 1915 he travelled to Cologne to become an Air Service observer before taking to the skies for the first time later that year.

His reputation became formidable quickly. Just a month after first sitting in a flying plane as a gunner, he took his first solo flight and soon became one of the best-known names in the German military.

His nickname - also translated as Red Devil and Red Knight - came from his disregard of combat or camouflage colours to paint his aircraft blood-red in a show of fearlessness.

But it was that love of combat that would be his undoing. 

In the summer of 1917, General Jan Smuts produced a War Office report calling for the creation of an entirely new addition to the Armed Forces.

Both the Royal Navy and the Army had developed their own airborne units - the Royal Naval Air Squadron and the Royal Flying Corps - but the war had made the argument for a separate entity to govern the sky.

The Government agreed. Within a year, the Royal Air Force was born and the 1st Viscount Rothermere was appointed the first Secretary of State for Air.

It was in aerial combat with the allies - and flying a Fokker DR1 - that the Baron would meet his fate. The pilot was 25 years old when he was shot down and killed near Amiens, France, on 21 April 1918.

Many theories exist about who killed him, and for a long time the RAF credited Canadian Captain Arthur 'Roy' Brown, who had to dive steeply at high speed to intervene in the dogfight. Later theories suggested the bullet which downed the Baron was fired from the ground.

20 Nov 16:02

Photo

Tadeu

Cool band name: The Doorswall



21 Nov 00:20

Why Books Are Still One Of Our Most Durable Technologies Ever

by Ria Misra

Why Books Are Still One Of Our Most Durable Technologies Ever

With limited free time for reading, tight publishing markets, and the rise of e-readers, people have been sounding the death knoll for the book for quite some time. But they haven't died. Not even close. So what is it that makes them so enduring?

Read more...








20 Nov 14:17

Photo





20 Nov 12:00

The XKCD Guide to the Universe’s Most Bizarre Physics

by Randall Munroe
The XKCD Guide to the Universe’s Most Bizarre Physics

Randall Munroe is the author of What If: Serious Scientific Answers to Absurd Hypothetical Questions, published in September.

The post The XKCD Guide to the Universe’s Most Bizarre Physics appeared first on WIRED.








21 Nov 01:42

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19 Nov 04:05

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20 Nov 11:01

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18 Nov 18:00

How to Get Back at the Scammers

How to Get Back at the Scammers

Submitted by: (via Techeblog)

Tagged: trolling , prank , texting , failbook
18 Nov 18:30

The Tech Skills and Courses Google Recommends for Software Engineers

by Melanie Pinola

The Tech Skills and Courses Google Recommends for Software Engineers

Software engineering is one of the most in-demand and best paying careers, but learning computer science can also pay off even if you don't do it professionally. Google has a guide on the courses and experiences future software engineers should consider.

Read more...








18 Nov 19:00

Any Cat Can Transform Into a Quick and Dirty Catbus!

Any Cat Can Transform Into a Quick and Dirty Catbus!

Submitted by: (via frikiskrew)

18 Nov 21:48

Zeus, the cosmic owl with a galaxy in its eyes. This adorable...



Zeus, the cosmic owl with a galaxy in its eyes.

This adorable Screech Owl is blind and likely has vitreous strands in his eyes causing this stellar effect. He now lives safely in captivity at the Wildlife Learning Center in Los Angeles.

19 Nov 18:29

This is so great I had to share it with you

Tadeu

🌅 Exploding Dog!

20 Nov 06:05

gadaboutgreen: celestialallegorist: thinkinghurts321: celestia...

















gadaboutgreen:

celestialallegorist:

thinkinghurts321:

celestialallegorist:

Okay but check out this on-point campaign my schools starting
((Lone Mountain is one of the buildings on campus and there’s a ridiculous set of stairs to get up to it))

Um whoa, how cool. The school is seriously doing this? This makes me want to visit again haha. 

Do you know what started it?

I’m actually not sure, but the posters say it’s a couple professors from the psych department, design department, and school of management working together on it. The posters should be up next week, I’m stoked

cesarconacento

20 Nov 10:00

Writing reports

by sharhalakis

image by @skromnygeniusz

19 Nov 00:15

Photo



19 Nov 05:23

We can rebuild him.



















We can rebuild him.

19 Nov 16:03

Concentrically Layered Ceramic Sculptures and Vessels by Matthew Chambers

by Christopher Jobson

Concentrically Layered Ceramic Sculptures and Vessels by Matthew Chambers  sculpture ceramics abstract

Concentrically Layered Ceramic Sculptures and Vessels by Matthew Chambers  sculpture ceramics abstract

Concentrically Layered Ceramic Sculptures and Vessels by Matthew Chambers  sculpture ceramics abstract

Concentrically Layered Ceramic Sculptures and Vessels by Matthew Chambers  sculpture ceramics abstract

Concentrically Layered Ceramic Sculptures and Vessels by Matthew Chambers  sculpture ceramics abstract

Concentrically Layered Ceramic Sculptures and Vessels by Matthew Chambers  sculpture ceramics abstract

Concentrically Layered Ceramic Sculptures and Vessels by Matthew Chambers  sculpture ceramics abstract

Concentrically Layered Ceramic Sculptures and Vessels by Matthew Chambers  sculpture ceramics abstract

Concentrically Layered Ceramic Sculptures and Vessels by Matthew Chambers  sculpture ceramics abstract

Concentrically Layered Ceramic Sculptures and Vessels by Matthew Chambers  sculpture ceramics abstract

Concentrically Layered Ceramic Sculptures and Vessels by Matthew Chambers  sculpture ceramics abstract

When stopping to consider these masterful ceramic objects by artist by Matthew Chambers, a flood of familiar images came to mind as I tried to understand what I was looking at. The aperture of a camera, the protective shell of a curled up armadillo, ocean waves, bowls of pasta, or portals to other dimensions; all valid reactions to these hand-built ceramic vessels and sculptures that contain dozens of thin concentric layers.

For the last 8 years Chambers has been working from a 215 square foot studio in Newport on the Isle of Wight where he creates each piece without the aid of sketches or designs, preferring to experiment as he works. Each “layer” is an individual section thrown on a potter’s wheel which he then assembles with other layers to make a solid sculpture. How something so precisely geometric can be formed from clay by hand is nothing short of astounding.

Chambers most recently had work at New Craftsman Gallery. You can also read a studio visit from Ceramic Arts Daily, and a more in-depth interview about his process on Ideas in the Making. (via Rhubarbes, Contemporist)

20 Nov 00:34

skatedistrict: Same place, different day.





skatedistrict:

Same place, different day.

18 Nov 21:08

Photo



17 Nov 21:34

I work out.



I work out.

18 Nov 15:20

[via]





[via]

17 Nov 19:14

drst: deeeeaaan: feng-huang: tastefullyoffensive: Life and...















drst:

deeeeaaan:

feng-huang:

tastefullyoffensive:

Life and Donuts by Pablo Stanley

I need to say this is one of the most uplifting things I’ve seen.

well that’s my existential crisis sorted out

seriously though its nice to have that kind of comfort written out like that

"What connects us to life?"
"Right now? I’m going with donuts"

15 Nov 09:05

allaboutskyrim: When Skyrim mods just go too far. 













allaboutskyrim:

When Skyrim mods just go too far. 

16 Nov 05:00

November 16, 2014


Have I mentioned that GULPO IS BACK?!
15 Nov 18:22

blazepress: Fireworks designed for daytime.



blazepress:

Fireworks designed for daytime.

12 Aug 22:18

Photo