Shared posts

30 Aug 12:44

GoPro Fetch Dog Harness

15 Aug 11:46

the party

by The Awkward Yeti

the Party

17 Aug 16:00

a quick break

by The Awkward Yeti

a quick break

12 Aug 12:18

Bombwatcher Surfboard Chairs by Surf Life Designs

05 Aug 20:09

Photo







23 May 17:47

Members of the Washington Ballet Demonstrate their Most Difficult Dance Moves in Slow Motion

by Christopher Jobson

Members of the Washington Ballet Demonstrate their Most Difficult Dance Moves in Slow Motion slow motion dancing ballet

In this video from the Washington Post, several members of the Washington Ballet demonstrate their most challenging moves. The points of peak action were shot with a high speed camera resulting in some impressive slow motion footage as each dancer seems to completely defy physics. (via Laughing Squid, The Kid Should See This)

21 May 18:39

Tourisme

by Levalet

Encre de chine sur papier sur mur et porte

MEMORIE URBANE - Latina (IT)

http://www.memorieurbane.it/

Tourisme
Tourisme
Tourisme
Tourisme
Tourisme
Tourisme
Tourisme
Tourisme
19 May 14:39

Ultra Small Bonsai Plants Give New Meaning to the Word Miniature

by Johnny Strategy

Ultra Small Bonsai Plants Give New Meaning to the Word Miniature plants miniature Japan bonsai

Ultra Small Bonsai Plants Give New Meaning to the Word Miniature plants miniature Japan bonsai

Ultra Small Bonsai Plants Give New Meaning to the Word Miniature plants miniature Japan bonsai

Ultra Small Bonsai Plants Give New Meaning to the Word Miniature plants miniature Japan bonsai

Ultra Small Bonsai Plants Give New Meaning to the Word Miniature plants miniature Japan bonsai

Ultra Small Bonsai Plants Give New Meaning to the Word Miniature plants miniature Japan bonsai

Ultra Small Bonsai Plants Give New Meaning to the Word Miniature plants miniature Japan bonsai

What happens when you apply of love of small things to an art form that’s already all about small things? In recent years Bonsai—Japan’s art form of growing miniature trees in miniature planters—has undergone a miniaturization trend. Industry experts consider bonsai plants less than 3 cm (about 1 inch) to be particularly difficult, but artists have taken on the challenge, creating tiny plants and tiny planters that, literally, are at your fingertips. It’s given rise to a new category, known as cho-mini bonsai, or ultra-small bonsai.

It’s no secret that the Japanese excel at making things smaller, whether it’s automobiles, electronics or food. In fact, Japan’s love of small things can be found in literature dating back over a 1,000 years. When it comes to the land of the rising sun, it’s clear that beauty comes in small packages. (via Archie McPhee, RocketNews24)

09 May 15:11

Very Committed Relationship Pizza Sweatshirt

01 May 14:38

Parking Tickets Booklet

25 Apr 07:01

Final Moments

by Doug

Final Moments

Here are more apocalypses.

And a reminder to Vancouver folks: I’ll be at the Carded! art show tomorrow night. You should go too – it looks like fun!

22 Apr 17:59

Detailed Stencil Street Art by Jana & JS

by Christopher Jobson

Detailed Stencil Street Art by Jana & JS street art stencils

Detailed Stencil Street Art by Jana & JS street art stencils

Detailed Stencil Street Art by Jana & JS street art stencils

Detailed Stencil Street Art by Jana & JS street art stencils

Detailed Stencil Street Art by Jana & JS street art stencils

Detailed Stencil Street Art by Jana & JS street art stencils

Jana & JS are a street art duo currently based in Austria who specialize in detailed stencil work, frequently depicting people with cameras or couples sharing intimate moments. Shown here are a few pieces from recent stops in the German countryside and Brookyln, see much more on their website and on Facebook. (via Hi-Fructose, StreetArtNews)

14 Apr 19:04

Artist Rachel Sussman Photographs the Oldest Living Things in the World before They Vanish

by Christopher Jobson

Artist Rachel Sussman Photographs the Oldest Living Things in the World before They Vanish science plants nature history
La Llareta (up to 3,000 years old; Atacama Desert, Chile)

Artist Rachel Sussman Photographs the Oldest Living Things in the World before They Vanish science plants nature history
Spruce Gran Picea #0909 – 11A07 (9,550 years old; Fulufjället, Sweden)

Artist Rachel Sussman Photographs the Oldest Living Things in the World before They Vanish science plants nature history
Welwitschia Mirabilis #0707-22411 (2,000 years old; Namib-Naukluft Desert, Namibia)

Artist Rachel Sussman Photographs the Oldest Living Things in the World before They Vanish science plants nature history
Antarctic Moss #0212-7B33 (5,500 years old; Elephant Island, Antarctica)

Artist Rachel Sussman Photographs the Oldest Living Things in the World before They Vanish science plants nature history
Jōmon Sugi, Japanese Cedar #0704-002 (2,180-7,000 years old; Yakushima, Japan

Artist Rachel Sussman Photographs the Oldest Living Things in the World before They Vanish science plants nature history
Underground Forest #0707-10333 (13,000 years old; Pretoria South Africa) DECEASED

Artist Rachel Sussman Photographs the Oldest Living Things in the World before They Vanish science plants nature history

Since 2004, Brooklyn-based contemporary artist Rachel Sussman has researched, collaborated with biologists, and braved some of the world’s harshest climates from Antarctica to the Mojave Desert in order to photograph the oldest continuously living organisms on Earth. This includes plants like Pando, the “Trembling Giant,” a colony of aspens in Utah with a massive underground root system estimated to be around 80,000 years old. Or the dense Llareta plants in South America that grow 1.5 centimeters anually and live over 3,000 years. This is the realm of life where time is measured in millennia, and where despite such astonishing longevity, ecosystems are now threatened due to climate change and human encroachment.

Sussman’s photographs have now been gathered together for the first time in The Oldest Living Things in the World, a new book published by the University of Chicago Press. Sitting at the intersection of art, science, and travelogue, the book details her adventures in tracking down each subject and relays the valuable scientific work done by scientists to understand them. It includes 124 photographs, 30 essays, infographics and forewords by Hans-Ulrich Obrist and Carl Zimmer.

You can learn more about Sussman’s project in her 2010 TED Talk. (via Hyperallergic)

Update: Rachel Sussman was just named a 2014 Guggenheim Fellow.

14 Apr 07:01

Apple vs Banana

by Doug
Sofía Henao

And these are some of the reason why I love bananas!

09 Apr 23:01

Photo

Sofía Henao

Estoy empezando a pensar que esa es una colección que yo debería hacer... :)



02 Apr 17:43

Photo



01 Apr 15:20

New Underwater Ink Plumes Photographed by Alberto Seveso

by Christopher Jobson

New Underwater Ink Plumes Photographed by Alberto Seveso water ink high speed

New Underwater Ink Plumes Photographed by Alberto Seveso water ink high speed

New Underwater Ink Plumes Photographed by Alberto Seveso water ink high speed

New Underwater Ink Plumes Photographed by Alberto Seveso water ink high speed

New Underwater Ink Plumes Photographed by Alberto Seveso water ink high speed

New Underwater Ink Plumes Photographed by Alberto Seveso water ink high speed

New Underwater Ink Plumes Photographed by Alberto Seveso water ink high speed

Photographer Alberto Seveso (previously) just released a new series of ink plumes photographed underwater against a black background titled Blackground. The Italian photographer and illustrator now lives and works in Bristol, UK where he does commercial work for digital brands, magazines, and album covers. Seveso was also kind enough to let us use an image from Blackground as part of small Colossal design refresh for the next few months.

01 Apr 15:37

You Can't Buy Happiness Screen Print


by Junoo
01 Apr 15:38

Dog's Not A Joke Doormat

30 Mar 21:55

this isn't happiness™ Peteski

by turn
28 Mar 14:52

DreamWorks Special Effects Artist Transforms His Son into a Superhero

by Christopher Jobson

DreamWorks Special Effects Artist Transforms His Son into a Superhero superheroes kids humor

Just when you think you’ve mastered every filter and editing technique when making a video of your kid chewing on Legos and pulling the cat’s tail, DreamWorks special effects artist Daniel Hashimoto arrives to trump us all. On his YouTube channel Action Movie Kid Hashmito bestows his son James with superhuman abilities and gives him gadgets of every child’s wildest imagination. Here are five of my favorites but you can see more here. (thnx, Jess!)

26 Mar 13:43

Exhibition

by Levalet

Encre de chine sur kraft sur mur.

Exhibition
Exhibition
Exhibition
Exhibition
Exhibition
Exhibition
26 Mar 16:19

A World Where Outdoor Advertising is Replaced by Classical Paintings

by Christopher Jobson

A World Where Outdoor Advertising is Replaced by Classical Paintings consumerism advertising

A World Where Outdoor Advertising is Replaced by Classical Paintings consumerism advertising

A World Where Outdoor Advertising is Replaced by Classical Paintings consumerism advertising

A World Where Outdoor Advertising is Replaced by Classical Paintings consumerism advertising

A World Where Outdoor Advertising is Replaced by Classical Paintings consumerism advertising

A World Where Outdoor Advertising is Replaced by Classical Paintings consumerism advertising

A World Where Outdoor Advertising is Replaced by Classical Paintings consumerism advertising

A World Where Outdoor Advertising is Replaced by Classical Paintings consumerism advertising

A World Where Outdoor Advertising is Replaced by Classical Paintings consumerism advertising

In this fun series of photos from the streets of Milan and Paris, artist Etienne Lavie imagines what the world might be like if invasive street advertisements were replaced with classical paintings. If instead of waiting for the bus next to a back-lit ad for a new car, you were given the opportunity to stare at Marco d’ Oggiono’s The Three Archangels. Lavie has shared very little about the tongue-in-cheek project titled “OMG who stole my ads?,” but art triumphing over consumerism in an urban utopia is pretty clear message. You can see much more of the series here. (via Colossal Submissions)

25 Mar 18:50

A Sprawling Wall-Sized Mural Drawn With Only a Black Sharpie by Sean Sullivan

by Johnny Strategy

A Sprawling Wall Sized Mural Drawn With Only a Black Sharpie by Sean Sullivan murals drawing
photos courtesy Joey Morris and LACE

A Sprawling Wall Sized Mural Drawn With Only a Black Sharpie by Sean Sullivan murals drawing

A Sprawling Wall Sized Mural Drawn With Only a Black Sharpie by Sean Sullivan murals drawing

A Sprawling Wall Sized Mural Drawn With Only a Black Sharpie by Sean Sullivan murals drawing

A Sprawling Wall Sized Mural Drawn With Only a Black Sharpie by Sean Sullivan murals drawing

A Sprawling Wall Sized Mural Drawn With Only a Black Sharpie by Sean Sullivan murals drawing

A Sprawling Wall Sized Mural Drawn With Only a Black Sharpie by Sean Sullivan murals drawing

After 7 long months of obsessively scribbling away on a large wall, artist Sean Sullivan “threw in the towel,” in part because he had exceeded his allotted time period by 4 months! The resulting mural was “Grand Pale Maw,” an expansive wall drawing that encompassed the entire rear corridor space of LACE in LA. Grand Pale Maw—Sullivan’s first large scale mural—was on display only through January 2012 but thanks to these photos documenting the process we can still ogle over them. (via Lost at E Minor)

24 Mar 07:01

Most Enjoyable

by Doug
21 Mar 14:06

The Beauty of Japan’s Artistic Manhole Covers

by Johnny Strategy

The Beauty of Japans Artistic Manhole Covers manholes Japan illustration
All photos courtesy S. Morita

The Beauty of Japans Artistic Manhole Covers manholes Japan illustration

The Beauty of Japans Artistic Manhole Covers manholes Japan illustration

The Beauty of Japans Artistic Manhole Covers manholes Japan illustration

The Beauty of Japans Artistic Manhole Covers manholes Japan illustration

The Beauty of Japans Artistic Manhole Covers manholes Japan illustration

The Beauty of Japans Artistic Manhole Covers manholes Japan illustration

The Beauty of Japans Artistic Manhole Covers manholes Japan illustration

The Beauty of Japans Artistic Manhole Covers manholes Japan illustration

The Beauty of Japans Artistic Manhole Covers manholes Japan illustration

Japan is a country full of amazing art. Some of it is housed within museums and galleries while others are right underneath our feet. I’m talking, of course, about Japan’s peculiar obsession with manhole covers. Just about anywhere in the country you can find stylized manhole covers, each more beautiful and intricate than the next. For the past several years photographer S. Morita has traveled around Japan photographing artistic manhole covers.

As to why this phenomenon developed, signs point to a high-ranking bureaucrat in the construction ministry who, in 1985, came up with the idea of allowing municipalities to design their own manhole covers. His objective was to raise awareness for costly sewage projects and make them more palatable for taxpayers.

Thanks to a few design contests and subsequent publications, the manhole craze took off and municipalities were soon competing with each other to see who could come up with the best designs. According to the Japan Society of Manhole Covers (yes, that’s a thing) today there are almost 6000 artistic manhole covers throughout Japan. And according to their latest findings, the largest single category are trees, followed by landscapes, floral designs and birds – all symbols that could, and surely did, boost local appeal.

You can see hundreds more of Morita’s photos right here. (via A Green Thought in a Green Shade)

Update: Remo Camerota has an entire book on the design of Japanese manhole covers, aptly titled Drainspotting.

15 Mar 03:15

timber hut on sleds by crosson clarke carnachan architects

by philip stevens I designboom

perched on the shore's dunes, the timber clad structure exists in harmony with its surroundings, blending into the landscape.

The post timber hut on sleds by crosson clarke carnachan architects appeared first on designboom | architecture & design magazine.

15 Mar 16:15

The Cyclist’s Empire: A New Print of the Empire State Building Made from Bicycle Tracks

by Christopher Jobson

The Cyclists Empire: A New Print of the Empire State Building Made from Bicycle Tracks tires posters and prints New York bicycles architecture

The Cyclists Empire: A New Print of the Empire State Building Made from Bicycle Tracks tires posters and prints New York bicycles architecture

The Cyclists Empire: A New Print of the Empire State Building Made from Bicycle Tracks tires posters and prints New York bicycles architecture

The Cyclists Empire: A New Print of the Empire State Building Made from Bicycle Tracks tires posters and prints New York bicycles architecture

The Cyclist’s Empire is the latest cycling-inspired print from the folks over at 100 Copies who print (as you might have guessed) only 100 copies of all their posters. This particular design was created using 7 different kinds of bicycle tracks that were rolled onto paper to mimic the structure of the Empire State Building. There’s only 75 left and these will be gone almost instantly so get one while you can.

17 Mar 15:50

Momentum: Large Format Photos of Chalkboards from Quantum Mechanics Institutions by Alejandro Guijarro

by Christopher Jobson
Sofía Henao

I want one!

Momentum: Large Format Photos of Chalkboards from Quantum Mechanics Institutions by Alejandro Guijarro science quantum mechanics math chalk

Momentum: Large Format Photos of Chalkboards from Quantum Mechanics Institutions by Alejandro Guijarro science quantum mechanics math chalk

Momentum: Large Format Photos of Chalkboards from Quantum Mechanics Institutions by Alejandro Guijarro science quantum mechanics math chalk

Momentum: Large Format Photos of Chalkboards from Quantum Mechanics Institutions by Alejandro Guijarro science quantum mechanics math chalk

Momentum: Large Format Photos of Chalkboards from Quantum Mechanics Institutions by Alejandro Guijarro science quantum mechanics math chalk

Momentum: Large Format Photos of Chalkboards from Quantum Mechanics Institutions by Alejandro Guijarro science quantum mechanics math chalk

Momentum: Large Format Photos of Chalkboards from Quantum Mechanics Institutions by Alejandro Guijarro science quantum mechanics math chalk

Momentum: Large Format Photos of Chalkboards from Quantum Mechanics Institutions by Alejandro Guijarro science quantum mechanics math chalk

Momentum is a project by artist Alejandro Guijarro who spent three years traveling to the quantum mechanics departments of Cambridge, Stanford, Berkeley, Oxford and elsewhere to shoot large format photographs of blackboards just after lectures. Completely removed from the context of a classroom or laboratory and displayed in a gallery, the cryptic equations from one of the most formidable branches of physics become abstract patterns of line and color. Via the artist’s statement:

Before he walks into a lecture hall Guijarro has no idea what he will find. He begins by recording the blackboard with the minimum of interference. No detail of the lecture hall is included, the blackboard frame is removed and we are left with a surface charged with abstract equations. At this stage they are documents. However, once removed from their institutional beginnings the meaning evolves. The viewer begins to appreciate the equations for their line and form. Colour comes into play and the waves created by the blackboard eraser suggest a vast landscape or galactic setting. The formulas appear to illustrate the worlds of Quantum Mechanics. What began as a precise lecture, a description of the physicist’s thought process, is transformed into a canvas open to any number of possibilities.

Guijarro graduated from the Royal College of Art in 2010 with a MA in fine art and now lives
and works in both London and Madrid. He’ll have work later this year at PhotoEspaña. (via Not Shaking the Grass)

13 Mar 14:58

Ceiling-Mounted Bike Lift