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29 Jul 23:54

Banksy Hits Paris with Sharp Political Criticism and Several Mischievous Rats [Updated]

by Sasha Bogojev

Against the backdrop of Paris Fashion Week which introduced several collaborative projects between high fashion brands and big names from the art world (Dior partnered with KAWS and Takashi Murakami continued collaborating with Virgil Abloh, the new artistic director of Louis Vuitton’s menswear collection), the French capital was hit for the first time hit by the world’s most elusive street artist—Banksy.

Without previous announcement or warning, Parisians began to discover several new street pieces that quickly materialized in the urban/street art galaxy of the social media universe and were eventually confirmed on Banksy’s official Instagram account.

The first piece was found near the Porte de la Chapelle metro station, where Paris’ refugee centre “La Bulle,” was located until August 2017. A city within a city, it was home to a makeshift camp of some 2,700 refugees and was dismantled an estimated 35 times before 2,000 migrants were bussed to temporary shelters. This was done as part of Emmanuel Macron’s wish to remove the refugees “off the streets, out of the woods,” as stated during his campaign.

With this in mind, Banksy revisited his “Go Flock Yourself” piece from 2008, and created a new version as commentary on the current political situation in France and throughout Europe. Depicting a black girl painting a Victorian wallpaper pattern over a swastika, the artist is commenting on the way politicians are concealing wrongdoing and potentially fascist policies.

Photo courtesy @WhereTheresWalls, used with permission

Photo courtesy @WhereTheresWalls, used with permission

The second and third pieces appeared soon thereafter. One depicts a suited man luring a three-legged dog with a bone while hiding a saw behind his back, a metaphor for politicians tricking people with promises that often have a masked, devastating agenda. The other is Banksy’s take on the iconic painting “Napoleon Crossing the Alps” by Jacques-Louis David, a symbol of French power and influence. By covering the rider with his own cape, the artist is commenting on the current misguided way the government is leading the country, blinding people with propaganda and false promises.

Photo courtesy @WhereTheresWalls, used with permission

Photo courtesy @WhereTheresWalls, used with permission

The last three pieces introduce Bansky’s signature rats to their genesis—Parisian artist Blek Le Rat and his rat stencils were a great influence on the Bristol-born artist, or as he stated in one of his recent IG posts: “The birthplace of modern stencil art.” Placing them around the city in ways that interact with local graffiti and building facades, it may appear as though they’re having fun blowing things up. But in reality, they are a reminder of a volatile period of civil unrest that took place in May 1968 when the government temporarily ceased to function.

In one piece a rat is propelled by a popping champagne cork. Using this symbol of affluence as their vehicle to overtake obstacles, the rodents are once again Banksy’s metaphor for working class people making significant change when they join together and fight for similar cause.

Of particular note in this Banksy “invasion” was that some of the works were miraculously revised overnight, allowing the artist to highlight one of the biggest advantages of stencil technique–its ability to be applied quickly and precisely. With this in mind, a small rat prepared to blow up a Pompidou Center sign suddenly morphed into a much larger rat with bandanna covered face. It now wields a large X-Acto knife, a common symbol of stencil cutting.

Included here are many of the works that have since emerged in Paris, but you can see several more here.

Update: This article was updated on 6/28/18 to include new images and details.

Photo courtesy @WhereTheresWalls, used with permission

Photo courtesy @WhereTheresWalls, used with permission

Photo courtesy @WhereTheresWalls, used with permission

Photo courtesy @WhereTheresWalls, used with permission

“I had planned to paint this on a wall, but ended up thinking it was more of a cartoon. So here it is as a cartoon.” – Banksy

29 Jul 23:44

Uncanny Portraits of Cats Crafted with Realistic Glass Eyes and Felted Wool

by Kate Sierzputowski

Japanese artist Wakuneco makes incredibly realistic portraits of feline heads, handcrafting the three-dimensional creations from felted wool. Making such lifelike cat faces has provided Wakuneco with quite the following on Youtube, where she posts how-to videos that lead her audience through the process of attaching the cats’ fur to perfectly securing each subject’s tiny whiskers. She pulls inspiration from images of real cats for her unique pieces, which range in breed, color, and size. She sells her sculpture objects on Yahoo! Auctions, but currently only ships within Japan. You can see more of Wakuneco’s pieces on Instagram and Twitter. (via My Modern Met and Laughing Squid)

27 Apr 03:12

OMY Embroidered Bracelets

by Katie

Fun! These embroidered bracelets from OMY are pure sartorial candy. Maybe your wrist needs a few of these to help brighten up your outfit for the day? Luckily, there’s several designs to choose from, so pick your favorites for a “sweet” stack.

One size : 2 snaps to adjust to your wrist.

Embroidered with colored satin thread by artisan embroiderers.
Composition: 83% Polyester – 17% Laiton – Nickel free
Size: 21 x 3 cm

OMY Embroidered Bracelets

OMY Embroidered Bracelets

OMY Embroidered Bracelets

OMY Embroidered Bracelets

24 Mar 01:45

Ed van der Elsken's street photographs of teenagers around the world in the 1950s and '60s

by Katy Cowan
Vali Myers in Saint Germain des Pres, Paris, 1951. All images copyright Ed van der Elsken, courtesy of Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

An exhibition of work by Ed van der Elsken, known as the "enfant terrible" of Dutch photography, will be on view at New York's Howard Greenberg Gallery from today until 5 May. "Love" & Other Stories will focus on the celebrated street photographer’s work from the 1950s and '60s documenting the social culture around him in Amsterdam, Paris, and Tokyo.

With a confident, gritty, and unconventional style, van der Elsken’s confrontational portraits of young love, alienation, and counterculture bohemian life paved the way for late 20th century photographers such as Larry Clark, Nan Goldin, and Wolfgang Tillmans. He is best known for his iconic photography book, Love on the Left Bank, 1954, acclaimed for expanding the boundaries of documentary photography. His work was most recently seen last year in a retrospective exhibition at the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam, which travelled to the Jeu de Paume in Paris and the Fundación Mapfre in Madrid.

Ed van der Elsken (1925-1990) was "a man who would have liked to have transplanted a camera into his head to permanently record the world around him," noted Beatrix Ruf, the director of the Stedelijk Museum and Marta Gili, the director of the Jeu de Paume wrote in his retrospective exhibition catalogue.

"He was always looking for what he called ‘my kind of people,’" said Hripsime Visser, the curator of the exhibition at the Stedelijk. "And what he meant by that was not the beautiful people and not the famous people but the people who tried to live or to survive."

Gangsters, Osaka, Japan, 1960. All images copyright Ed van der Elsken, courtesy of Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

Gangsters, Osaka, Japan, 1960. All images copyright Ed van der Elsken, courtesy of Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

Damplatz, Amsterdam, 1966. All images copyright Ed van der Elsken, courtesy of Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

Damplatz, Amsterdam, 1966. All images copyright Ed van der Elsken, courtesy of Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

Audience at a Concert of Ella Fitzgerald, 1957. All images copyright Ed van der Elsken, courtesy of Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

Audience at a Concert of Ella Fitzgerald, 1957. All images copyright Ed van der Elsken, courtesy of Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

In de Uitgaansbuurt Shibuya, Tokyo, 1987. All images copyright Ed van der Elsken, courtesy of Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

In de Uitgaansbuurt Shibuya, Tokyo, 1987. All images copyright Ed van der Elsken, courtesy of Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

Teenagers, Amsterdam, c.1962. All images copyright Ed van der Elsken, courtesy of Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

Teenagers, Amsterdam, c.1962. All images copyright Ed van der Elsken, courtesy of Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

24 Mar 01:41

Delicate Inked Lines Form Fluffy Black Cats in Illustrations by Kamwei Fong

by Laura Staugaitis

Using only black ink, Malaysian illustrator Kamwei Fong has created a menagerie of playful black cats. Despite their contextual isolation and uniform style, each of Fong’s cats display unique personalities: some are fluffed and puffed into self-contained balls; others look with curiosity or wariness at fish that dangle or waves that crash from the animals’ own tails. The artist builds each feline form using innumerable short thin lines, varying the density of the marks to create volume as well as a palpable sense of furriness.

Fong has been working as an illustrator since 2010, under the moniker Bo & Friends, and in addition to his cat character, which he calls The Furry Thing, he dreams up similarly charming monkeys, goldfish, puppies, and other animals in his line-driven black ink drawings. Fong sells signed print editions of his animal illustrations in his Etsy shop, and also partners with Galerie Club Sensible in Paris. You can see more of his work on Instagram and Facebook.

24 Mar 01:40

Somerset House celebrates Britain’s thriving independent magazine scene

by Laura Collinson
Print! compilation image © Courtesy of Stack/Somerset House, Burnt Roti, Crash!, gal-dem, Garageland, Mushpit, Oz, Private Eye, Positive News, Spare Rib, and Thiiird

In a new exhibition at London's Somerset House, the independent magazine scene in Britain is celebrated through its voices that challenge the mainstream.

From 8 June - 22 August 2018, Print! Tearing It Up will be the first exhibition to trace the journey of independent voices in magazines and journals from their roots in the early 20th century, to today's contemporary titles.

Contrary to the idea that print is a dying trade, the show aims to illustrate that these freethinking publications reflect a wider independent culture while proving that print is going from strength to strength in the digital era.

Curated by writer Paul Gorman (The Story of The Face, In Their Own Write: Adventures In The Music Press) and Somerset House’s Senior Curator Claire Catterall with graphic design by Scott King, the exhibition will feature titles including the likes of Private Eye, Crash!, Mushpit, Spare Rib, Ladybeard, gal-dem, Thiiird, Burnt Roti, The Face, Real Review, Friends/Frendz, i-D, Dazed and many more.

Sharan Dhaliwal, editor-in-chief of Burnt Roti, said: "Print publishing means that we're not posting articles which are lost in the ether of the internet. We're shoving our faces in everyone else's and saying: 'we exist."

Print! Tearing It Up: Independent British magazines changing the world kicks off at Somerset House on 8 June 2018. For more information visit www.somersethouse.org.uk.

gal-dem Issue 2 © gal-dem

gal-dem Issue 2 © gal-dem

Mushpit Issue 9 CRISIS 2016 © Mushpit

Mushpit Issue 9 CRISIS 2016 © Mushpit

Crash! Issue 1, 1997 © Scott King and Matthew Worley, Courtesy of the artists and Herald St, London

Crash! Issue 1, 1997 © Scott King and Matthew Worley, Courtesy of the artists and Herald St, London

Burnt Roti Issue 0 May 2016 © Burnt Roti

Burnt Roti Issue 0 May 2016 © Burnt Roti

Garageland Issue 19 2015 SELF © Paul Gorman Archive/ Photography: Milly Spooner

Garageland Issue 19 2015 SELF © Paul Gorman Archive/ Photography: Milly Spooner

Positive News Issue 90 Third Quarter 2017 NEW MASCULINITY © Positive News Magazine/ Paul Gorman Archive/Photography: Theo Jemison

Positive News Issue 90 Third Quarter 2017 NEW MASCULINITY © Positive News Magazine/ Paul Gorman Archive/Photography: Theo Jemison

Spare Rib 1972 © Angela Phillips

Spare Rib 1972 © Angela Phillips

Thiiird Issue 1 COMMUNITY © Thiiird/Photography: Turkina Faso

Thiiird Issue 1 COMMUNITY © Thiiird/Photography: Turkina Faso

24 Mar 01:25

Minima Muralia: A Collection of 15 Years of Murals by Street Artist Blu

by Kate Sierzputowski

The newly published book Minima Muralia condenses more than 200 larger-than-life murals painted by Blu (previously) into one 288-page collection. The compendium covers every piece made by the Italian street artist over the last 15 years, including backstage shots and unreleased works pulled from his archive. A special edition of the book has also been released, featuring a 32-page zine, two posters, and a specially-designed book casing. You can order both releases on Zooo Print & Press.

In addition to putting out this recent compilation of his works, Blu has also painted a new mural in the town of La Punta, just outside of Valencia, Spain. The piece was created as a part of the Sensemurs Project, a group of muralists attempting to raise awareness about the preservation of peri-urban orchards in towns affected by rapid urbanization across Europe. You can see this new mural, along with work by Borondo and Daniel Munoz SAN, over on Juxtapoz.

24 Mar 01:25

Ancient Ruins Reconstructed with Architectural GIFs

by Laura Staugaitis

Parthenon, Greece

Today, views of the world’s ancient architectural wonders are firmly based in their current state of ruin, leaving to visitors’ imaginations the original glory of structures like the Parthenon, Pyramid of the Sun, and Temple of Luxor. NeoMam, in a project for Expedia, has resurrected several ancient buildings through a series of gifs. In a matter of seconds, centuries of natural and intentional damage and decay are reversed to reveal a rare glimpse at what the original structures would have looked like. The creative contractors behind the labor-intensive renderings are Maja Wrońska (previously) and her husband Przemek Sobiecki, who works as This Is Render.  (via designboom)

Pyramid of the Sun, Mexico

Temple of Largo Argentina, Rome

Nohoch Mul Pyramid (Coba), Mexico

Temple of Luxor, Egypt

Temple of Jupiter, Italy

Hadrian’s Wall, England

28 Feb 00:46

Una Lee creates digital interactive sound map of an imaginary island

by Laura Collinson

Belfast-based sound and multimedia artist Una Lee pursues alternative ways of storytelling. She sings, narrates, collects field recordings and makes things, as well as composing and designing her own live and/or fixed performances and intervention scenarios.

Many of her works, whilst being primarily sound-based, incorporate interdisciplinary aspects that blend performance art, visual art and theatre practice.

Most recently, for her OĀZE project, Una has created a sound map of an imaginary island. She explains: "Unlike most sound maps that employ Google Maps or similar, this one uses digitally illustrated original map and aerial views of places such as market, harbour, villages and landscapes, initially based on real places.

"As sound maps do, it also features field recordings which are accompanied by voice narrations that tell fragmented stories about a woman who was born and raised, and has lived her entire life on this fictional island."

The work blends digital illustration, fictional storytelling, sound art and creative technology into one. For more details visit optophono.com/oaze.

01 Feb 04:28

Hilarious Movie Poster Mash-Ups

by Kala
Jimena Azpeitia

esta medio bobo, pero unos me hicieron reír ja

L’artiste français Olivier Gamblin a créé des mash-ups amusants dans sa série Mixologist. Jouant avec des titres de films et assemblant des personnages improbables sur les affiches, Gamblin nous fait imaginer des films où ET rencontre Gravity et Natalie Portman joue avec Will Smith dans Men in Black Swan. Voir le reste sur son site.

29 Jan 16:25

Today's Special: four decades of street photography reveal how New York has changed

by Katy Cowan

Born and raised in Brooklyn and now living in Manhattan, Jeff Rothstein is a quintessential New York photographer who has tirelessly chronicled the evolving city's life on the streets. To celebrate four decades of his work, a new book, Today's Special, has been published, featuring photos of people going about their lives – some famous, most anonymous – as well as a cityscape of littered sidewalks and dilapidated buildings set against modern skyscrapers.

The shots were taken between 1969 and 2006. "'Reading' the photos in Today's Special, I sense an almost fictional account assembled after the actual times when these photographs were shot," writes art critic Robert C. Morgan in his essay in the photobook. "But the story these photographs tell is imposed on a powerful history, beginning with the escalation of the Vietnam War and concluding with the tragic aftermath of the Iraqi invasion.

"None of this we see directly, only perhaps glimpsing in the faces and gestures of his subjects. They tell a more authentic story at any given time as they move from their solitary living spaces into the public space of crowded anonymity – the streets of New York."

Speaking of his work, Jeff says: "Wandering the streets with my 35mm cameras loaded with b&w film, I consider myself an urban observer. I try to capture the city's environment – structures, signs and, most of all, the fleeting moments of people on the streets that will soon disappear into thin air."

Today's Special: New York City Images 1969-2006 is available via jeffrothsteinphotos.com. All images courtesy of Jeff Rothstein.

29 Jan 15:53

Fictional Comic Book Covers of the TV Series Black Mirror

by Kala

Butcher Billy, un illustrateur basé au Brésil, a créé des couvertures de bandes dessinées fictives pour les six episodes de la 4ème saison de Black Mirror. Utilisant de charmants graphismes retro et de la typographie, il capture l’esthétique des bandes dessinées américaines des années 50, un régal pour les fans de série et les collectionneurs de bandes dessinées. Suivez le sur Behance et Instagram.

29 Jan 05:45

A Norwegian University Student Used a Spy Camera in This Amazing Example of 19th Century Street Photography

by Christopher Jobson

All images courtesy the Norwegian Folk Museum.

Fredrik Carl Mülertz Størmer is known mostly as an accomplished mathematician and physicist from Norway, but as a side hobby he was also an amateur photographer, taking to the streets of Oslo with a bulky camera secreted in his clothing to capture candid moments of unsuspecting passersby. Most of his photos were taken in the 1890s while Størmer was a 19-year-old student at the Royal Frederick University using a Stirn Concealed Vest Spy Camera, a secretive camera with a narrow lens designed to poke through a vest pocket’s buttonhole.

Størmer’s photography stands in stark contrast to portraiture of the era that consisted mainly of staid and unsmiling images against decorative backdrops. Here we see a rare view of people going about their daily lives nearly 125 years ago, often smiling and perhaps caught off guard from the young student angling for the shot. To see more of Størmer’s work head over to Norwegian Folkmuseum. (via Bored Panda)

29 Jan 05:23

Beautiful 1980s Portraits of Berlin’s Individuals

by Mehdi

En 1981, le photographe allemand Harf Zimmermann emménageait dans la Hufelandstrasse, rue pavée dans l’ouest de Berlin. Rapidement, il s’est rendu compte d’où il avait mis les pieds,  ses voisins étant plus atypiques les uns que les autres, oasis d’originalité dans une ville morose assiégée par les Soviétiques. Malheureusement, en 1987, le sol a a été empoisonné par les fuites de gaz et le lieu changé à jamais. En guise de témoin final, Zimmermann et son appareil photo, qui a immortalisé cette époque unique.

29 Jan 05:13

Biggest Musical Icons of the 80s Photographed by Brian Griffin

by Kala

POP, le livre du photographe Brian Griffin, est une ode aux grands noms de la musique qui sont apparus au milieu des années 70 jusqu’à la fin des années 80. Immortalisant les stars comme Iggy Pop, Kate Bush, Elvis Costello et Echo and the Bunnymen, les portraits de Griffin révèlent les personnages de chaque artiste, ainsi que l’ambiance intensément creative et excitante de cette période. Le livre POP est publié par GOST Books, disponible ici.

29 Jan 05:09

Under Cover: Photographs that reveal a secret history of cross-dressers

by Katy Cowan
Man in makeup wearing ring. Photograph from a photo booth, with highlights of color. United States, circa 1920. © Sebastian Lifshitz Collection Courtesy of Sebastian Lifshitz and The Photographers’ Gallery

Under Cover: A Secret History of Cross-Dressers at The Photographers' Gallery will reveal a rare selection of discovered, largely anonymous, photographs of men and women posing for the camera, using the apparel and gestures traditionally assigned to the ‘opposite sex’.

Drawn from the extensive personal archives of filmmaker and photography collector Sébastien Lifshitz, this exhibition of amateur photographs from Europe and the US explores the surprisingly widespread practice of cross-dressing, through a century of private images. Dating from 1880 onwards, the photos are mostly of unnamed and unknown figures – the majority having been collected from flea markets, garage sales, junk shops and eBay, amongst other non-specialist spaces – and offer a candid view into the hidden worlds of individuals and groups that chose to defy gender conventions.

Lifshitz’s initial collecting impulse was a fascination with the vernacular documentation of cross-dressing; his criteria to accumulate photographs, which showed men dressing as women and vice versa. As the collection grew, he began to trace both commonalities and differences between the images, which proposed a much more nuanced exploration of cross-dressing culture.

The exhibition also includes unique images of Marie-Pierre Pruvot (born Jean-Pierre Pruvot, 11 November 1935) the renowned Algerian-born French transsexual woman who performed under the stage name Bambi, and who was the subject of an award-winning documentary by Lifshitz in 2013.

Brought together, the photographs reflect a range of styles and attitudes from theatrical, defiant, shy, proud, subversive and understated; showing individuals and groups from different classes, professions, genders and nationalities, whose commonality is that they dared to play with dress codes in front of a camera, even if unable to do so in public. They celebrate the collective inventiveness and freedom that the seemingly simple act of dressing differently provides. The exhibition offers a fascinating precedent to today’s diverse Queer and trans spectrum and pre-empts a world where such self-expression is celebrated.

Under Cover: A Secret History of Cross-Dressers opens 23 Feb 2018 at The Photographers’ Gallery, London.

Five performers on a platform. Handwritten on verso 'Haris Fifi, Zerneck Joe, Gaby Zerkovitz, Stasik Ficzin Mehelyi Mimi’. Albumen print, Hungary, circa 1900. © Sebastian Lifshitz Collection Courtesy of Sebastian Lifshitz and The Photographers’ Gallery

Five performers on a platform. Handwritten on verso 'Haris Fifi, Zerneck Joe, Gaby Zerkovitz, Stasik Ficzin Mehelyi Mimi’. Albumen print, Hungary, circa 1900. © Sebastian Lifshitz Collection Courtesy of Sebastian Lifshitz and The Photographers’ Gallery

Guilda, [one of a triptych]. New York, United States, circa 1950. © Sebastian Lifshitz Collection Courtesy of Sebastian Lifshitz and The Photographers’ Gallery

Guilda, [one of a triptych]. New York, United States, circa 1950. © Sebastian Lifshitz Collection Courtesy of Sebastian Lifshitz and The Photographers’ Gallery

Mock wedding, United States, circa 1900. © Sebastian Lifshitz Collection Courtesy of Sebastian Lifshitz and The Photographers’ Gallery

Mock wedding, United States, circa 1900. © Sebastian Lifshitz Collection Courtesy of Sebastian Lifshitz and The Photographers’ Gallery

Man dressed as a woman, Mannheim, Germany, circa 1960. Courtesy of Sebastian Lifshitz and The Photographers’ Gallery

Man dressed as a woman, Mannheim, Germany, circa 1960. Courtesy of Sebastian Lifshitz and The Photographers’ Gallery

English prisoners of war in the German camp, Frankfurt. Handwritten on verso 'Artists, Jude "& J. Lewis, second lieutenant, Welsh Regiment, 1st the King's own”. Albumen print, Hungary, circa 1900. Courtesy of Sebastian Lifshitz and The Photographers’ Gallery

English prisoners of war in the German camp, Frankfurt. Handwritten on verso 'Artists, Jude "& J. Lewis, second lieutenant, Welsh Regiment, 1st the King's own”. Albumen print, Hungary, circa 1900. Courtesy of Sebastian Lifshitz and The Photographers’ Gallery

29 Jan 05:07

Dreamy Wong Kar Wai-Inspired Images

by Kala

Pour ce photoshoot, le photographe Piotr Chrobot, basé à Dubai, se laisse inspirer par le film emblématique de Wong Kar Wai, « In the Mood for Love ». Il explore la beauté mélancolique de l’esthétique du réalisateur dans une collection d’images romantiques et langoureuses. Riche d’émotion, ce travaux présente un beau récit visuel d’amour et de tristesse. Voir plus de son travail ici, et le suivre sur Instagram.
Model: Dada

29 Jan 05:06

Old Unseen Pictures of a Young Prince

by Mehdi

Prince n’a pas toujours été une star planétaire. En 1977, par exemple, sa discographie ne contenait qu’une démo du morceau Soft & Wet. Suffisant pour le photographe Robert Whitman, qui s’est empressé de photographier ce jeune artiste en qui il avait su déceler le génie avant tout le monde. 40 ans plus tard, Whitman livre ses photos au magazine i-D.

29 Jan 05:02

Lower East and Upper West: Vintage photographs of New York's vibrant street life

by Katy Cowan
Four related girls, one holding a cat, 1957

The vibrant street life and people of New York City's Lower East Side and Upper West Side in the 1950s and 1960s are presented in this fascinating series and new book of black-and-white photographs by Jonathan Brand.

A census taker, and later an advertising copywriter, Brand chronicled life as he encountered it on his walks through the city. The book offers over 100 striking images of New Yorkers engaged in everyday pursuits, from the Bowery to Riverside Park, juice stands and barbershops to the theatre in the streets.

With an introduction by Julia Dolan, The Minor White Curator of Photography at the Portland Art Museum, Oregon, this is the first book from a photographer who developed his art alongside many of the best-known in his discipline. Brand's photographs capture the energy, odd juxtapositions, and intimate moments of life in mid-century New York City.

Jonathan Brand has been photographing daily life since 1956. A native New Yorker and Vermonter, he has also lived and worked in Scandinavia and Portland, Oregon. He developed his photography through study with some of the most accomplished photographers of his day: Richard Avedon, Garry Winogrand, David Vestal, and Bruce Davidson. An acute observer of street life as well as everyday family rhythms, Brand has captured public and private moments in arresting images.

From Lower East and Upper West by Jonathan Brand is published by powerHouse Books.

Boys on East Houston Street, 1960

Boys on East Houston Street, 1960

Family out for a walk with collie, 1960

Family out for a walk with collie, 1960

Woman with her hand on her hip, holding a cigarette, 1963

Woman with her hand on her hip, holding a cigarette, 1963

Theater in the Street performance, September 21, 1963

Theater in the Street performance, September 21, 1963

Vermont family on a motorcycle, 1957

Vermont family on a motorcycle, 1957

Store vendor with watermelons in shopping carts, 1966

Store vendor with watermelons in shopping carts, 1966

Monika in sunglasses, 1963

Monika in sunglasses, 1963

Two young men waiting at the corner, 1965

Two young men waiting at the corner, 1965

“7up your thirst away,” 1965

“7up your thirst away,” 1965

Window dresser striking a pose, 1960s

Window dresser striking a pose, 1960s

Jenny, Ulrika, and Monika on Swedish grandmother’s bedspread looking out the window toward Broadway at West 89th Street, 1967

Jenny, Ulrika, and Monika on Swedish grandmother’s bedspread looking out the window toward Broadway at West 89th Street, 1967

29 Jan 04:28

Circus Work: Photographer Peter Lavery spends 50 years documenting Britain's circuses

by Laura Collinson
© Peter Lavery

For anyone who has ever dreamt of running away with the circus or simply wondered what life is like for the jugglers, clowns, and acrobats, a new exhibition at The Harley Gallery in Worksop by acclaimed photographer Peter Lavery captures what goes on behind the scenes at the Big Top.

Lavery has spent the last 50 years following and photographing circuses the length and breadth of Britain and Ireland. His show, Circus Work, is the first to document this five-decade-long project. Taken in both black and white and colour these intimately detailed, large-scale photographs show circus performers relaxing while off duty, practising, getting ready to perform, part made-up and costumed, and revealingly off-guard.

Lisa Gee, Director at The Harley Gallery, said: “Peter Lavery’s pictures capture a world unknown to most of us. He takes us behind the curtain to see the grit amidst the glamour, the contrast between the mundane and the magical and reveals the hard work and humanity of this unique community.”

The son of a miner, Lavery has developed an enduring interest and passion for his subject since dropping in on a small indoor circus in his hometown of Wakefield in 1968: "I was immediately struck by the disparity between the outward exoticism, the finery, the sequined costumes, the plumes, the elaborate display and backstage ordinariness. At once I was enthralled by the sounds and the smell, but I had no idea the subject would capture and hold my imagination for the best part of five decades."

Circus Work is part of Circus250, a UK-wide celebration of 250 years of the circus. In 1768, on an abandoned patch of land near London’s Waterloo, showman, entrepreneur and equestrian rider Philip Astley did something entirely new. He gathered together a series of physical acts composed of jugglers, acrobats, clowns, strong men and bareback riders and drew out the very first circus ring. Astley had created a whole new art form – this was the world’s first circus; every circus, anywhere, began at this moment.

Circus Work is showing at The Harley Gallery on the Welbeck estate, between Nottingham and Sheffield, from 3 February until 15 April 2018.

Caroline Gerbola on Conchita Fossett Brothers Tralee Ireland 1986. © Peter Lavery

Caroline Gerbola on Conchita Fossett Brothers Tralee Ireland 1986. © Peter Lavery

Five Blackpool Tower Circusettes in their changing room Blackpool Tower 1974. © Peter Lavery

Five Blackpool Tower Circusettes in their changing room Blackpool Tower 1974. © Peter Lavery

© Peter Lavery

© Peter Lavery

Gabor Eotvos Senior Tibor Eotvos and Gabor Eotvos Junior Eotvos Billy Smarts Fairfield Hall Croydon 1971. © Peter Lavery

Gabor Eotvos Senior Tibor Eotvos and Gabor Eotvos Junior Eotvos Billy Smarts Fairfield Hall Croydon 1971. © Peter Lavery

Ruslan Daurbekov Moscow State Circus 1988. © Peter Lavery

Ruslan Daurbekov Moscow State Circus 1988. © Peter Lavery

29 Jan 04:17

Mesmerizing Typography on Fashion Photographs

by Pierre

Le jeune artiste Parisien Louis Stimes brouille les lignes entre typographie, photographie et design dans ses oeuvres, dessinées à l’encre de chine sur des photographies de mode. Avec son style unique et son identité forte, il crée des visuels percutants sur les courbes, rendant chaque traits plus appuyé, chaque mot plus élancé. Spontané, inattendu et toujours très créatif, Louis redéfinis l’interprétation de la mode, en la sortant des pages de magazines pour en faire un support vivant, et vibrant. Son travail et ses collaborations sont à suivre sur Instagram.

 


 

29 Jan 03:46

Impressive Body Mandalas

by Pierre

L’artiste Argentin Federico Bianchi, basé à Miami, a réalisé une superbe série appelée « Body Mandala », qui met en scène des corps et parties du corps dans des visuels complexes, inspirés des mandalas. A partir de photos qu’il prend avec soin, il compose ses créations de manière digitale, jusqu’à obtenir le résultat souhaité. Une très belle réinterprétation des courbes naturelles du corps humain. Retrouvez son travail sur Instagram

29 Jan 03:40

Artist Spotlight: Julie Cockburn

by Staff

Another batch of found photos, colourfully embroidered by artist Julie Cockburn. Click here for previous post. See more images below.

 

Julie Cockburn

24 Jan 00:11

Kuu: A Reversible, Moon-Inspired Pendant Light by Elina Ulvio

by Caroline Williamson
Jimena Azpeitia

tan monitas

Kuu: A Reversible, Moon-Inspired Pendant Light by Elina Ulvio

Elina Ulvio is back with a series of reversible pendant lights that were inspired by the moon. Kuu, which is Finnish for ‘moon’, are designed to provide direct and indirect light by simply rotating the pendant’s inner circle. Thanks to its wireless connection, the light can rotate endlessly within its oval enclosure.

The lamp can rotate throughout the day as the light changes with passing time and it can go from direct to indirect depending on your needs. Not only does the light change, the fixture’s appearance does too with the round and crescent shapes evolving, much like the moon does.

Kuu will soon be launched by Danish brand Mater.

Photos by Karin Ulvio.

22 Jan 21:29

On the Street….All White, Paris

by The Sartorialist
Jimena Azpeitia

llevo 200 post del sartorialist poniendome al día despues de mucho de no verlo y mana… la acualeta esta por todos lados!

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I’m always jealous of people that can wear all-white with such confidence and ease.

 

I’d always be checking if I spilled something or sat in something.

 

Maybe the smart way ,for me, to wear all-white is to wear it for short, specific events (with very little food served) like maybe an exhibit opening or ballet performance.

20 Jan 21:36

Samaná: A Joint Collaboration That Celebrates the Ritual of Coffee

by Vy Tran

Samaná: A Joint Collaboration That Celebrates the Ritual of Coffee

Named after a coffee region between Bogotá and Medellin, Samaná is a collaborative project between Mexican designer José Bermúdez and Columbian designers Vrokka and Fango Studio that beautifies the ritual of making coffee.

There are two parts to the project. First, the Samaná container made from solid ash wood houses all the coffeewares in the collection and is inspired by the shape of the wooden boxes used by coffee growers. The height of the container is a nod to Mexican cantinas where people meet to drink and chat; the same idea can be applied to this container while making coffee. A leather tab opens the container up to the coffeewares which can be placed on the container’s steel top.

The second part of the project are the Samaná coffeewares. These coffee accessories are made from ceramic and solid oak wood and use the drip method to brew coffee, creating a more intimate bond between the user and the coffee ritual.

19 Jan 21:29

Multi-ccino Mug

by Katie

What’s the best gift for a coffee-drinking perfectionist? This Multi-ccino Mug, that’s what. The borosilicate glass mug has indicators printed on the outside for customizing proportions of espresso, milk, and water for the perfect brew. Do take note it’s currently on backorder (boooo) so don’t count on it for this holiday’s gift-giving exchange.

Multi-ccino Mug

16 Jan 03:33

Le Creuset: Stars & Cosmos

by Jen McCabe
Jimena Azpeitia

me gutaaaa

As you may have already noticed, I’m a big fan of the stars, the moon, mysteries of outer space, AND shades of blue. Of course this exclusive Le Creuset dream collection featuring a blackened blue and swirling stars would have to be released right after I finally purchased my first dutch oven. OF COURSE. The cute dutch oven with stars is only available in the 4.5 quart size and it’s not in the budget right now, unfortunately. I’ll just keep ogling it while I consider one of the other pieces in the black blue Cosmos hue, like that glorious Cosmos 9qt Round Dutch Oven. There are some sweet ceramic pieces, like the Cosmos French Press and Cosmos Mugs, that are mighty tempting as well. More HERE.

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Cosmos 4 Quart Casserole | 2.25 Quart Saucepan | 4.5 Quart Round Oven with Stars | 3.5 Quart Braiser | 6.75 Quart Oval Oven | 5 Quart Oval Oven

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Cosmos 4.5 Quart Round Oven with Stars | 5.5 Quart Round Oven | 7.25 Quart Round Oven | 9 Quart Round Oven | 10.25″ Skillet

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Cosmos 2.25 Quart Saucepan | Cosmos French Press | 12-Ounce Mug | 4.5 Quart Round Oven with Stars | 9″ Square Baking Dish | 12″x 9″ Rectangular Dish

27 Dec 04:16

Everyday Objects Obsessively Organized into Patterns by Adam Hillman

by Christopher Jobson

New Jersey-based “object arranger” Adam Hillman has really stepped up his organization efforts the last few months, pushing his precisely organized patterns of everyday objects into increasingly more complicated designs. Everything from breakfast cereal to office supplies finds its place in these tightly controlled symmetrical layouts that take hours to measure, cut, and arrange. Hillman now shares some of his best work as prints and you can follow him on Instagram.

21 Nov 17:12

Quirky Cartoon Toys and Vases Carved from Wood by Yen Jui-Lin

by Christopher Jobson

Taiwanese artist Yen Jui-Lin carves delightful cartoon-like figures from wood that are almost guaranteed to bring a smile to your face. Some of the pieces function as flower vases or key hooks, while many of the objects are one-off toys that he gives to his children as gifts. You can see many more on Jui-Lin’s Facebook page. (via Lustik)