20 Aug 00:00

California

58% of the state has gone into plaid.
19 Aug 22:21

Why You Should Parent Like a Video Game

by Brett & Kate McKay

Video Game Header 2-900

From boyhood all the way through my college years I loved playing video games – many a night you could find me mashing the buttons on my controller as I worked my way through the levels of Super Mario Brothers and killed bad dudes in GoldenEye.

These days, as a husband and father of two young kids, I don’t have the time nor desire to plant my keister in front of the latest console. And yet there’s an aspect of video games that’s still a part of my day-to-day life. While I’m no longer playing a video game, I’m living one…in the way I parent my children.

Why You Should Parent Like a Video Game

Our oldest kid, Gus, will be four in October. One of the trickiest parts of parenting is figuring out how to get your kid to do stuff they’re supposed to do and stop doing stuff that’s annoying, i.e. temper tantrums, talking back, writing on the walls, etc. No one tells you that parenting is basically one giant psychological experiment in human motivation. Before Gus came along, Kate and I had only a vague idea of how we were going to handle our kids’ misbehavior, but it wasn’t very fleshed out, or, more importantly, field-tested (everybody knows exactly how to be an awesome parent…before they have kids!).

Everyone loves to give you advice about what you should and shouldn’t do when it comes to parenting, and there are umpteen thousand books and blogs out there that this or that friend will rave about. But really, the principles of good parenting are pretty tried and true and generally agreed upon. The real trick is remembering to implement them when you’re about ready to load your toddler into a cannon and shoot ‘em to the moon.

On that front, there is one metaphor that has helped Kate and I tremendously in adopting positive practices: parent like a video game. I picked up this analogy from psychologist Howard Glasser, who argues that the principles that govern the world of video games are also highly effective in getting your kids to behave.

Let’s take a look at what those principles are and how to implement them into your parenting style:

Establish Clear Rules

When you’re playing a video game, you know that button A makes you punch, that touching a bad guy will kill you, and that you need a certain amount of XP before you can level up. Knowing the rules helps you operate confidently within the game’s landscape.

In the same way, make sure your kids know what the rules are in your family. A study done in 1967 by Stanley Coopersmith showed that parents who gave their kids the most rules and limits had children with the highest self-esteem, while those who gave the most freedom had kids with the lowest self-esteem. Kids want limits, and they’re essential to healthy progress.

Keep your rules clear and simple, just like in a video game: input A gets you output B. Every. Single. Time. Giving your child consistent limits, rewards, and discipline is one key in helping them develop an “internal locus of control.” People with an internal locus of control believe that by doing A, they can get B — they see a correlation between action and consequences versus believing in blind luck or that the world is out to get them. Show your kids that good behavior leads to reward, bad behavior leads to punishment.

Promise a reward for an accomplishment, and give it to your child if and only if they attain it. Set a rule and punishment, and if the rule is broken, follow through on the exact punishment promised. Consistent parenting ingrains these kinds of connections in your child’s mind, and bolsters their confidence and resilience.

When they do violate a rule, let them know that they did and begin the “reset”:

Issue Short, Consistent “Resets” for Bad Behavior

Video Game 1-2-900

In Super Mario Bros., if Mario touches a Goomba, he dies and has to start back from the beginning. There are no warnings or counting to three or bargaining with the Goomba about whether or not Mario dies. Mario doesn’t get lectured about how he shouldn’t touch unsuspecting Goombas, nor is he asked why he wasn’t paying attention. Ultimately, Mario touched the Goomba, so he has to go back to the beginning. That’s it – that’s the rule.

Moreover, Goombas stay dispassionate when dispensing their punishment. Sure, they always look grumpy (you’d be grumpy too if you were a mushroom) but they don’t get any grumpier when Mario dies. They just keep shuffling back and forth, pretty much like nothing happened.

The consequence for touching a Goomba is also short-lived. Mario flies up into the air and that trademark “Mario Dies” music plays. But then you’re immediately playing again. You’re not sent to some dungeon level where you have to watch Mario just stand in a prison cell for 10 minutes before you can jump back into the fray.

The consequences for your kid’s misbehavior should be similarly consistent, dispassionate, and swift. Glasser argues that when we engage in heated lecturing and angry cajoling after our kids mess up, we’re just “rewarding” them with our energy and attention — two things all children want from their parents. The form that attention takes isn’t as important to them as the fact that they’re getting it — period. As Glasser shrewdly observes, “No one would purposely give a child a hundred dollars for breaking a rule, but we inadvertently do it all the time by way of giving children the ‘gift of us’ as we are doling out the consequence.”

Instead, when your kids break a rule, the consequence should kick in immediately without a bunch of preliminary back and forth and emotional hullabaloo. Don’t give them a warning and don’t negotiate with them. Just issue the consequence, be it a time-out or taking away screen time or adding a chore to their routine. Glasser argues that any consequence that temporarily takes away the kid’s options and deprives them of your attention can be effective.

When you deliver the consequence, do it dispassionately. Don’t get angry or raise your voice and start lecturing or ask why they’d do such a thing. And never criticize their character (“You’re so naughty!”), but just their behavior (“We don’t throw blocks in this house.”). Making them feel as though their character is inherently flawed just induces passivity and hopelessness. Bad behavior, on the other hand, is temporary and something they can work to overcome. As neutrally and unemotionally as possible, simply say something like, “Uh oh, you’re throwing a tantrum. You broke a rule. Go to your room to calm down and stay there until I get you.”

In addition to staying completely calm as you issue a consequence, remember to keep the punishments as consistent as possible in both their timing and severity. Remember, input A gets them output B. Every time they throw a block, you calmly send them to time-out. Don’t let your mood dictate the punishment, so that when you’re tired and don’t want to deal with it you just let the infraction slide, and when you’re irritated, you totally flip out on them. Every time they break a certain rule, they get the same dispassionate tone of response, and the same punishment. See? This is what happens when you touch a Goomba. 

It’s also important to make the time-out, or “reset” short, just like in video games. You don’t want to sequester your kid in their room for twenty minutes only to have them throwing books from their shelves and rolling around on the ground screaming like a banshee the entire time. The purpose of the reset is to get kids to stop whatever inappropriate behavior they’re doing and then get them back into “game play” as soon as possible so that they can get positive reinforcement for behaving well. Time-outs don’t work unless kids have rich time-ins, which brings us to…

Create Rich and Rewarding Game Play

Video Game 2-2-900

In video games, it doesn’t matter how much you die and get sent back to the beginning, you still want to keep playing because the game play is so stinking fun and rewarding. You’re constantly getting feedback and rewards for accomplishing certain tasks. Stomp a Goomba, and you get 100 points; kill a bad guy in Final Fantasy, earn XP; beat a Big Boss in Zelda, get a piece of the Triforce. The video game is ready and waiting to reward you with coins, XP, or new weapons as soon as you do something that warrants them.

Whenever we experience a reward in a video game, our brain gets hit with a bit of dopamine which 1) makes us feel good and 2) re-wires our brain to motivate us to keep on doing what we’re doing. The way video games stimulate our dopamine production is part of what makes them so seemingly addicting. Resets in video games due to dying or not completing a level in time only make you more driven to get back into the game and get some more hits of that feel-good dopamine.

Thus with kids, Glasser argues that the key to making time-outs work is that you have to make “time-in” or “game play” rich and rewarding by giving your kids positive energy and attention for the good stuff they’re doing (or the bad stuff they’re not doing). “If the child perceives there is nothing worth missing out on then what is the motivation for wanting to stay in the game?” he asks.

Creating rich and rewarding game play for our tykes can be pretty hard. Unlike video games that are programmed to reward you anytime you do a certain task, us human dads lack the omnipresence to dole out praise for every good thing our kiddo does.

The other thing that makes creating rich and rewarding game play difficult is that the simple act of showing appreciation is hard, especially when you’re trying to praise your kids for bad behavior they’ve managed to abstain from. Our minds are evolved with a negativity bias so that “bad things” sound alarms in our brains while “good things” hardly register. So it takes intentional work to remember to point out and give praise to your toddler when he isn’t throwing a tantrum in the face of a potentially frustrating situation.

But that effort pays off. Glasser and other researchers point out that positive feedback is more effective than negative feedback in teaching kids appropriate behavior. So as much as you can, aim to “catch” your kids doing something good. Point out and praise even the most mundane actions. If your kid picks up her toys without asking, say something like, “Jill, that was great how you picked up your toys. It showed me how considerate you are and how much of a good helper you are.”

Just as importantly, point out and show appreciation when your tyke isn’t doing something he shouldn’t be doing. For example, if your kid usually throws a temper tantrum when you tell him it’s time to go to bed, but this time he heads to his room without a peep, say, “Brian, I appreciate how you started getting ready for bed as soon as I told you to. Way to stay calm, buddy.” Ding! Your kid just stomped a Goomba.

If he’s sitting at church and keeping himself occupied quietly, say, “Sam, good job staying quiet and calm during church. I know it can be hard to do that sometimes.” BAM! Your tyke just earned 1000XP and is on his way to leveling up to a well-adjusted adult.

I know there’s a current in our culture that says kids are over-praised and that this coddling turns them into entitled brats. There’s some truth to that, but here’s the key difference: With this parenting method, you’re not rewarding them for nothing, or just for being. You praise them for good, small, tangible things they actually do. It doesn’t turn them into spoiled turds; it creates a neural pathway where they keep wanting to do the right things again and again.

Stay in the Moment

Video games don’t hold grudges about past slip-ups nor do they sit around anticipating that you’ll mess up in the future. Video games are present in the moment; every game is a fresh start in which the pitfalls to be avoided are exactly the same, and the player has exactly the same chance to earn rewards as he always does.

Don’t hold a tantrum that your kid threw yesterday over his head today nor treat your kid like he’s already committed a peccadillo even when he hasn’t. Just keep doling out dispassionate resets and consistent rewards.

Conclusion

Clear rules and consistent punishments bolster children’s resiliency because they know exactly what to expect. Doing A will always get them B — for better and worse. They know they can choose their behavior, but they can’t choose the invariable consequences. And positive reinforcement motivates them to more often choose good behavior over bad. This isn’t groundbreaking advice, but the video game analogy has honestly proven amazingly effective in helping us both remember to implement these tried and true principles on a day-to-day basis. It’s actually become somewhat of a game for us, in seeing just how calm and composed we can remain while issuing consequences, and how often we can catch Gus doing something good.

So far this parenting methodology seems to be working great. That’s not to say that Gus is the paragon of a well-behaved child. He has his moments, but for the most part he’s a really good kiddo. Our times hanging out are largely calm, enjoyable, and a lot of fun. Of course it’s hubris to think that just because your kid is doing well now, he’ll continue to stay on the right path as he grows up. No parent knows what will happen over time and I can’t make any claims for this method’s long-term efficacy. I can just say that for now this approach has been very effective for him, and it’s given us an accessible, helpful framework for guiding our parenting decisions, instead of going at it willy nilly.

So, when it comes to parenting, rather than harnessing your inner Dr. Spock, consider tapping into your inner Dr. Mario. Now if there was only a Konami Code for potty training….

19 Aug 16:44

GIF Youtube

add "gif" to the beginning of any youtube.com URL  
19 Aug 15:33

Star Wars: The Despecialized Edition

by Jason Kottke

A remastered copy of the original 1977 Han-shoots-first version of Star Wars is out there and you can watch it but it's probably illegal. But Disney is never going to show it to you, so maybe it's ok to find it on Bittorrent?

The Despecialized Edition is the years-long work of a diverse group of people who have taken elements from many different sources and created the ultimate version of the first Star Wars film. It has also been upgraded to display properly on high definition screens, with high-quality sounds and a near perfect image.

The latest Blu-Ray release of the film serves as the skeleton for this edition, but elements of the 2006 bonus DVD that included the unaltered version of the film was also used to remove special effects and edits that were added by Lucas.

Here's a short feature on the video sources used:

And here's how to get the full film.

Tags: movies   Star Wars   video
21 Aug 19:20

e v e r y t h i n g

by johnnyoffline
21 Aug 18:59

Good Partnership between Sulfur and Fluorine: Sulfur-Based Fluorination and Fluoroalkylation Reagents for Organic Synthesis

by Chuanfa Ni, Mingyou Hu and Jinbo Hu

TOC Graphic

Chemical Reviews
DOI: 10.1021/cr5002386
21 Aug 18:13

Siurrealistinis, Gediminas Pranckevicius







Siurrealistinis, Gediminas Pranckevicius

21 Aug 16:18

By the Silent Line: Photographer Pierre Folk Spent Years Documenting a Vanishing 160-Year-Old Parisian Railway

by Christopher Jobson

By the Silent Line: Photographer Pierre Folk Spent Years Documenting a Vanishing 160 Year Old Parisian Railway trains Paris history

By the Silent Line: Photographer Pierre Folk Spent Years Documenting a Vanishing 160 Year Old Parisian Railway trains Paris history

By the Silent Line: Photographer Pierre Folk Spent Years Documenting a Vanishing 160 Year Old Parisian Railway trains Paris history

By the Silent Line: Photographer Pierre Folk Spent Years Documenting a Vanishing 160 Year Old Parisian Railway trains Paris history

By the Silent Line: Photographer Pierre Folk Spent Years Documenting a Vanishing 160 Year Old Parisian Railway trains Paris history

By the Silent Line: Photographer Pierre Folk Spent Years Documenting a Vanishing 160 Year Old Parisian Railway trains Paris history

By the Silent Line: Photographer Pierre Folk Spent Years Documenting a Vanishing 160 Year Old Parisian Railway trains Paris history

By the Silent Line: Photographer Pierre Folk Spent Years Documenting a Vanishing 160 Year Old Parisian Railway trains Paris history

By the Silent Line: Photographer Pierre Folk Spent Years Documenting a Vanishing 160 Year Old Parisian Railway trains Paris history

By the Silent Line: Photographer Pierre Folk Spent Years Documenting a Vanishing 160 Year Old Parisian Railway trains Paris history

The Chemin de fer de Petite Ceinture (French for “little belt railway”) was a 32 km railway that encirled Paris, connecting all the major railway stations within fortified walls during the Industrial Revolution. In service from 1852 to 1934, the line has now been completely abandoned for 80 years.

Several developers and local officials have recently set their sights on the vast swath of unused land, tunnels, and stations as an opportunity for new development. However, some railway enthusiasts and related organizations want the tracks and stations to be preserved indefinitely as part of the cities’ heritage. Others want to turn areas of de Petite Ceinture into parkways similar to the nearby Promenade plantée, a 4.7 km park built on an elevated train track in 1988 that later inspired New York’s famous High Line.

As part of his project “By the Silent Line,” photographer Pierre Folk has been working since 2011 to photograph the 160-year-old railway’s last remnants before any final decisions are made. He stalks the tracks at all times of the year, often returning to the same locations to document nature’s slow reclamation as rusted tracks and crumbling tunnels are swallowed by trees, vines, and grass. This is just a small selection of Folk’s work, you can see many more photos right here.

21 Aug 09:00

Who wrote this?

by sharhalakis

by uaiHebert

21 Aug 05:45

Цитата #429685

ierofant:
Из дачного.
Наш воспитанный, городской, полупородистый кот на уикэнде любил задирать деревенских собак. И в этот раз, вероятно, по обыкновению, откушав чего-нибудь из их мисок, вполне ожидаемо спровоцировал погоню.
Кот мчал к дому по улочкам дачного кооператива. Но силы были неравны. Пушистый хвост маячил уже в полуметре от клацающих зубами, истекающих слюнями шавок…Последний поворот с заносом тыла – и вот он, родной порог, в прямой видимости.
А у ворот стояла мама с лопатой. Страшная сила, между прочим.
Вот она, кошачья фортуна, подумал кот. Затормозив с полицейским разворотом, он повернулся к шавкам и нагло зашипел. Вообще, можно шипеть на кого угодно, если у тебя в тылу – женщина с тяжелым холодным оружием.
Собаки, мягко говоря, не ожидали. Поперхнулись слюнями и сели на зад.
Недоуменно помотав головой, не сразу, но отступили. Ведь лопата это аргумент.
И бестолково оглядываясь, разочарованно потрусили прочь…
Гордый собой кот не отходил в тот день от мамы.
А под утро принес ей на подушку свежеубиенную белую мышь.
Оценил спасение хвоста в жизнь мышачьей принцессы.
Воспитанный же.
20 Aug 23:08

Photo



20 Aug 22:11

How to Break In a Fitted Baseball Hat

by Brett

LamarBill copy

Last year when I added an Art of Manliness ball cap to our shop, a bunch of guys said, “Hey! What’s with the flat-billed hat? Those aren’t manly!” At first these comments had me confused, since it wasn’t a flat-billed cap, but simply a traditional baseball hat that hadn’t been broken in yet.

When I asked for clarification, I was admittedly flabbergasted. The guys who ragged on our hat admitted that they thought all ball caps either came with a flat bill or one that had already been curved. They had no idea that baseball hats could (and should!) be broken in, and that you could curve the bill yourself.

It seems what was once essential man knowledge has been lost over time. So today I’d like to revive this classic bit of know-how, and offer a tutorial on how to break in a baseball hat.

How to Make a Fitted Baseball Hat Conform to Your Unique Cranium

To achieve a fitted ball cap that conforms to your unique cranium, you’ll first want to buy a hat that’s a bit bigger than your head. Wool and cotton shrink with heat and moisture, and your head will amply produce these elements while you wear your hat. So give your new ball cap a little wiggle room to shrink down to fit the contours of your splendid dome. If your hat is made out of polyester (like many of the newer ball caps are), then you don’t have to worry too much about it shrinking, though the tips below can still help create a better fit.

Before you get started: remove any stickers. Such is the sad state of baseball capology that I even have to articulate this step.

Just wear it. As just mentioned, heat and moisture are the key ingredients in getting a ball cap to sit properly on your head, so just wear it all the time and let nature do its work. Over time, the hat will gradually conform to your brain canister.

If you’re impatient, there are a couple things you can do to speed the process along:

hotwater

Soak the crown of the ball cap in hot water and then wear it until it dries. This only works on wool or cotton hats. It won’t do anything for the polyester variety. Make sure to let the hat cool off a bit before you put it on.

Take a hot shower in your ball cap and wear it until it dries. In lieu of the hot water soak, I’ve known guys to wear their baseball hat in a hot shower (heat and moisture!) and then just keep on wearing it until it dries. The only drawback to this method is that getting the bill wet may damage it, making it harder to curve (see below).

How to Make a Fitted Baseball Hat That’s Too Small Fit Your Giant Noggin

If you get a fitted baseball hat as a gift, but it happens to be a bit too small for your giant noggin, there’s still a chance you can make that hat fit comfortably.

This happened to me a few years ago. Kate got me a vintage Tulsa Oilers baseball hat from Ebbets Field Flannels for my birthday, but it was about a half size too small. They were of out of stock in a larger size, so I took to the internet to figure out ways to stretch a fitted hat and make it a tad bigger. Here’s what worked for me:

Your hat can’t be too small for your head. The techniques below won’t work if your hat is an entire size too small. I think at most, you can get away with stretching a hat that’s half a size shy of fitting.

cut

If your hat is too small, make two vertical cuts in the sweatband. Make sure to not make the cut all the way through.

Strategically cut parts of the sweatband. Make two cuts in the sweatband near the back of the hat. That should loosen things up a bit. Make sure not to cut the hat itself. You could do that if you wanted to loosen things up even more – but it just doesn’t look purty.

stretch1

Simultaneously (and slowly) pull the bill with your hands and push out with your knee until you hear a loud “POP!” That “pop” is the sound of stitching coming apart in your hat.

Stretch the hat until you hear a “pop.” If making two cuts in the sweatband doesn’t work, this technique will. Place your hat on your knee with the bill facing you. Grab the bill with both hands. Simultaneously (and slowly) pull the bill with your hands and push out with your knee until you hear a loud “POP!” That “pop” is the sound of stitching coming apart in your hat.

Make sure to do this slowly and in a controlled manner. If you yank too hard too fast, you could rip the bill off of the hat. As soon as you hear that popping sound, stop stretching.

Undoing that bit of stitching really adds some room in your hat. After I did this with my Oilers cap, it fit like a glove. Don’t worry, your hat won’t fall apart. Mine is still going strong three years after I popped it.

No Flat Bills: How to Shape a Baseball Cap Bill

I know the whippersnappers out there like to keep the bills of their hats flat, but trends be damned. Perhaps I’m just a fist-shaking curmudgeon stuck in my ways, but I’ve always thought the flat bill thing looked goofy. It has a tendency to make the crown appear bigger, which consequently makes the wearer look like a boy sporting his dad’s ball cap. Baseball hats are already an accessory associated with the younger set; wedded to a flat bill, they make a guy look about twelve. Which I guess is okay if you’re actually 12, but after that you should wear a cap like a grown man – bill curved.

So as a public service to you youngsters and an exercise in nostalgia for us old-timers, below I show you various ways to create the perfect curve in the bill of your ball cap:

hands

Shape it with your hands. The simplest way to do it. There’s definitely a “feel” you have to have to get the perfect curve. It’s almost like shaping clay. Getting your bill to stay in its curved position will require frequent manipulation for a few days.

Babe_Ruth_Red_Sox_1918

While a symmetrical curve looks nice, some of the pros have always ignored this rule in favor of rocking an off-kilter bill that’s all their own.

There are a few risks with the hands-on method. One is that instead of giving the bill a nice gentle curve, you create a sharp bend; you want a kind of upside-down “U” rather than an upside-down “V” shape. You also want to make sure the curve is symmetrical — that the trough of the “U” sits right in the middle of the bill.

hatcoffee

Shameless self-promotion: Hat and mug available in the AoM Store.

Stick the bill in a coffee mug overnight. No hassle and leaves a long-lasting, well-formed curve in your bill. This is my preferred method.

soupcan

Wrap the bill around a softball or soup can. Just bend the bill around a softball or soup can and secure it in place with a rubber band. Leave overnight. This method lends the bill a subtle curve.

fold

Curve the bill, fold it back into the hat, and leave overnight. Curve your bill and then fold it back into the hat so that it stays in place. Leave overnight. This is an okay method, but in my experience, the bill doesn’t stay curved all that well while it’s tucked into the back of your hat, so you don’t end up with much of a bend.

How do you break in your baseball hats? Share your methods with us in the comments!

20 Aug 16:28

Artist Maskull Lasserre Carves Imagined Skeletons into Souvenir Sculptures and Decoys

by Christopher Jobson

Artist Maskull Lasserre Carves Imagined Skeletons into Souvenir Sculptures and Decoys wood sculpture anatomy
Decoy Study (Duck), 2014. 15 x 5 x 6 inches.

Artist Maskull Lasserre Carves Imagined Skeletons into Souvenir Sculptures and Decoys wood sculpture anatomy
Decoy Study (Duck), 2014. 15 x 5 x 6 inches.

Artist Maskull Lasserre Carves Imagined Skeletons into Souvenir Sculptures and Decoys wood sculpture anatomy
Decoy Study (Duck), 2014. 15 x 5 x 6 inches.

Artist Maskull Lasserre Carves Imagined Skeletons into Souvenir Sculptures and Decoys wood sculpture anatomy
Souvenir Skeleton, 2014. (re-)carved African drummer figure. 10 x 5 x 26 inches.

Artist Maskull Lasserre Carves Imagined Skeletons into Souvenir Sculptures and Decoys wood sculpture anatomy
Souvenir Skeleton, 2014. (re-)carved African drummer figure. 10 x 5 x 26 inches.

Artist Maskull Lasserre Carves Imagined Skeletons into Souvenir Sculptures and Decoys wood sculpture anatomy
Souvenir Skeleton, 2014. (re-)carved African drummer figure. 10 x 5 x 26 inches.

Artist Maskull Lasserre Carves Imagined Skeletons into Souvenir Sculptures and Decoys wood sculpture anatomy
Souvenir Skeleton, 2014. (re-)carved African drummer figure. 10 x 5 x 26 inches.

Artist Maskull Lasserre Carves Imagined Skeletons into Souvenir Sculptures and Decoys wood sculpture anatomy
Shaman Anatomy, 2014. (re-)carved South American shaman bust. 5 x 5 x 20 inches.

Artist Maskull Lasserre Carves Imagined Skeletons into Souvenir Sculptures and Decoys wood sculpture anatomy
Shaman Anatomy, 2014. (re-)carved South American shaman bust. 5 x 5 x 20 inches.

Artist Maskull Lasserre Carves Imagined Skeletons into Souvenir Sculptures and Decoys wood sculpture anatomy
Shaman Anatomy, 2014. (re-)carved South American shaman bust. 5 x 5 x 20 inches.

For his latest body of work, artist Maskull Lasserre acquired a number of souvenir sculptures, the kind found in antique stores or craft fairs that have been mass-produced by anonymous artists, which he then used as a foundation for his own artwork. In a process he refers to as “re-carving,” Lasserre removed details from the artist’s original work to reveal intricate skeletal structures, a process we’ve marveled at numerous times over the last few years here on Colossal. If you happen to be in New York, the pieces are on view for two more days at Junior Projects as part of the Regular JOhn show curated by Jim Lee. You can see many more photos of each piece over in Lasserre’s portfolio. (via Design Milk)

20 Aug 07:01

Lunch Break

by Doug
19 Aug 23:05

Publishing before and now

19 Aug 19:23

Coupling of Sterically Hindered Trisubstituted Olefins and Benzocyclobutenones by CC Activation: Total Synthesis and Structural Revision of Cycloinumakiol

by Tao Xu, Guangbin Dong

Abstract

The first total syntheses of the proposed structure of cycloinumakiol (1) and its C5 epimer (18) are achieved in a concise and efficient fashion. Starting from the known 3-hydroxybenzocyclobutenone, 1 and 18 are obtained in nine and five steps with overall yields of 15 % and 33 %, respectively. The key for the success of this approach is the use of a catalytic C[BOND]C activation strategy for constructing the tetracyclic core of 1 through carboacylation of a sterically hindered trisubstituted olefin with benzocyclobutenone. In addition, the structure of the natural cycloinumakiol was reassigned to 19-hydroxytotarol (7) through X-ray diffraction analysis. This work demonstrates the potential of C[BOND]C activation for streamlining complex natural product synthesis.

Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

The mystery is solved: The first total synthesis of the proposed structure of cycloinumakiol is achieved by rhodium catalysis. In the key step, the coupling of a trisubstituted olefin with a benzocyclobutenone through C[BOND]C activation yields the tetracyclic core skeleton. Comparison of the synthetic product to natural cycloinumakiol revealed a misassignment and the natural compound was unambiguously identified as 19-hydroxytotarol.

22 Aug 04:45

Цитата #429702

Александр: Не нравиться погаловная безграмотность.
Мариет: Александр, безграмотность пишется раздельно.
21 Aug 20:00

[via]



[via]

21 Aug 19:50

Et3N-Catalyzed Tandem Formal [4 + 3] Annulation/Decarboxylation/Isomerization of Methyl Coumalate with Imine Esters: Access to Functionalized Azepine Derivatives

by Kang Liu, Huai-Long Teng and Chun-Jiang Wang

TOC Graphic

Organic Letters
DOI: 10.1021/ol5020569
21 Aug 18:43

snail snail snail snail snail [x]



snail snail snail snail snail [x]

21 Aug 16:55

birdasaurus: Haarlo, Netherlands

21 Aug 16:42

World's oldest eel dies

by Jason Kottke

In the days before running water, towns used to place an eel or two in the well to keep the water supply free of bugs, algae, and other critters. A Swedish well-eel that lived to be at least 155 years old died recently. Eels generally live to be around seven years old in the wild.

Åle was put in the well in the fishing village of Brantevik on the southeastern tip of Sweden by eight-year-old Samuel Nilsson in 1859. This was a common practice in a time when running water was rare (Stockholm only got public water mains in the 1850s; it took more than a century after that for waterworks to be installed in smaller towns) and a good eel could keep the home's water supply free of bugs, worms, eggs, algae and any other number of critters. European eels will even eat carrion, so they're extremely helpful additions to a well.

This particular eel has been a star for close to a hundred years, garnering articles in the paper, TV news stories and documentaries, even making an appearance in the Swedish Tom Sawyer, Bombi Bitt and I written by Fritiof Nilsson Piraten in 1932. Thomas Kjellman, current owner of the cottage, remembers Åle from when he was a boy. His family bought the house in 1962 with the understanding that the eel came with the property.

Luckily the family has a backup eel which is around 110 years old, swimming around in what is apparently a Fountain of Youth for eels.

21 Aug 15:34

پنجشنبه سی مرداد

by محـمد
دیشب تو جمع خانوادگی داشتن دنبال یه نفر می‌گشتن که سه روز بره انبار یه کارخونه‌ای کار کنه. زنگ می‌زدن به دوست و آشنا و فامیل‌هایی که که سابقه نگهبانی و این چیزها داشتن. همه‌ش فکر می‌کردم خب من که اینجام چرا کسی به من نمیگه. آخرش گفتم آقا اگه کسیو پیدا نکردید من هستم. همه با تعجب نگاه کردن که تو؟ گفتم آره دیگه. طرف گفت آخه اونورِ کرجه تو انباره سختته. فکر می‌کردن در شأن من نیست. کی اینا فکر کردن من شأن خاصی دارم؟ گفتم میرم. تو حالت عادی شاید نمی‌گفتم ولی فکر می‌کنم واکنش طبیعی‌ام بود به این چند روز عصبی و باطلی که گذشت. باید با مترو می‌رفتم آخر خط گلشهر کرج بعد از اونجا با تاکسی‌های کمالشهر می‌رفتم تا به یه نمایندگی ایران خودرو برسم. ساعت شش و نیم راه افتادم. آدمهای اون موقعِ مترو خیلی جالبن. تصویرشون با آدمهای آخر شبِ مترو فرقی نمی‌کنه، همه خوابن. به پله‌های ایستگاه ارم سبز که رسیدم گفتم ای دل غافل. همین چند روز پیش نوشته بودم پاهام از بالا رفتن از پله‌هاش درد گرفته و کارگرهایی رو دیده بودم که روی پله‌ها می دویدن. حالا خودم کارگری بودم که می‌دویدم که به قطار برسم. انگار روزها رویای روزهای بعد خودشون شدند.
نور خیلی مایل و کم‌جون اون وقت صبح خیلی خوبه. با اینکه خوابم می‌اومد ولی نمی‌تونستم چشم از سایه‌های دراز بردارم. تصورم از کمالشهر بیابونی بود ولی نه تنها شهر بود بلکه فهمیدم داف‌ها همه جا همین رنگ‌اند. ولی انبار از دنیای بیرونش جدا بود. یه جای بسته بدون تهویه که ردیف‌های طولانی خاک گرفته قفسه‌ها پر از لوازم یدکی ماشین‌های ایران خودرو بود. من و چند نفر دیگه باید برای انبارگردانی همه این وسایل رو یک به یک می‌شمردیم و لیست می‌کردیم. کارگرهای داخل انبار یادآور کهن الگوی «مرد تعمیرکار و مشتری زن اغواگر» تو فیلم‌های پورن بودند. خوش‌قیافه با بدن‌های ورزیده و لباس‌های یه تیکه‌ای که دوبنده داشت و یقه‌های تا پایین باز و دستکش‌های تا مچ دست و ماسک‌های زیر چونه. با هم حرفی نمی‌زدند و اگر هم حرفی رد و بدل می‌شد اسم قطعات ماشین بود که من بلد نبودم. و از اونجایی که حشر کلمات نامأنوس دارم از این همه کلمه‌ی ناآشنا خوشم می‌اومد. 
کار رو شروع کردیم و من قطعه‌های ریز ماشین‌ها رو لیست می‌کردم. وضعیت عجیبی بود. من که رانندگی بلد نبودم و هیچی از ماشین سر درنمی‌آوردم داشتم قضیه رو برعکس می‌رفتم، از جزء به کل. هر قفسه مربوط به یه ماشین بود. یکی اومده بود تو انبار و داشت می‌گفت هر چی وسیله پیکان خواستید دور بریزید بدید به من، من استفاده می‌کنم. چقدر پیکان بدبخت شده که شما باش این رفتارو می‌کنید. خیلی دلسوز پیکان بود. مسئول اونجا بش گفت فقط تو حامی پیکانی. روزی که پراید بخری میگن دوره پیکان تموم شد. ماسک زده بودیم و تو اون دخمه تاریک و خاک گرفته یکی یکی وسایل رو تو سکوت لیست می‌کردیم. کار بیهوده و لذت‌بخشی بود. دم ظهر ناهار خوردیم و من و دو نفر دیگه بعد از ناهار کنار هم روی موکت وسط انبار دراز کشیده بودیم و خیره به سقف حرف‌های مفت می‌زدیم. دیشب وسط مهمونی فکرش رو هم نمی‌کردم که بعد از ناهار فردا این وضعیت رو داشته باشم. از کاری که کرده بودم راضی بودم. تو راه برگشت انقدر خسته بودم که هر کاری کردم که خوابم نبره که بتونم ایستگاه اکباتان پیاده شم نشد و تو آخرین لحظه‌ی بسته شدن در از قطار بیرون پریدم. به حق کارهای نکرده.
21 Aug 13:44

[thegentlemansarmchair]

21 Aug 13:25

C–H Functionalization in the Synthesis of Amino Acids and Peptides

by Anaïs F. M. Noisier and Margaret A. Brimble

TOC Graphic

Chemical Reviews
DOI: 10.1021/cr500200x