Shared posts

01 Jul 19:05

Mazo De La Roche (LOC)

by The Library of Congress

The Library of Congress posted a photo:

Mazo De La Roche (LOC)

Bain News Service,, publisher.

Mazo De La Roche

[between ca. 1915 and ca. 1920]

1 negative : glass ; 5 x 7 in. or smaller.

Notes:
Title from unverified data provided by the Bain News Service on the negatives or caption cards.
Forms part of: George Grantham Bain Collection (Library of Congress).

Format: Glass negatives.

Rights Info: No known restrictions on publication.

Repository: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Washington, D.C. 20540 USA, hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print

General information about the Bain Collection is available at hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.ggbain

Higher resolution image is available (Persistent URL): hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ggbain.24645

Call Number: LC-B2- 4239-17

01 Jul 19:05

Filipino Athletes in Tokyo (LOC)

by The Library of Congress

The Library of Congress posted a photo:

Filipino Athletes in Tokyo (LOC)

Bain News Service,, publisher.

Filipino Athletes in Tokyo

[between ca. 1915 and ca. 1920]

1 negative : glass ; 5 x 7 in. or smaller.

Notes:
Title from unverified data provided by the Bain News Service on the negatives or caption cards.
Forms part of: George Grantham Bain Collection (Library of Congress).

Subjects:
Tokyo

Format: Glass negatives.

Rights Info: No known restrictions on publication.

Repository: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Washington, D.C. 20540 USA, hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print

General information about the Bain Collection is available at hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.ggbain

Higher resolution image is available (Persistent URL): hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ggbain.24647

Call Number: LC-B2- 4240-3

29 Jun 12:24

Squib: A Ruby DSL for prototyping card and board games

by overbey
roverbey

ATTN: Firehose

Squib is a Ruby DSL for prototyping card and board games. Write a little bit of Ruby, define your deck's stats, then compile your game into a series of images ready for print-and-play or even print-on-demand. Squib is very data-driven and built on the principle of Don't Repeat Yourself. Think of it like nanDeck done "the Ruby way".
29 Jun 09:19

Has Always Been a Part of China, Huh?

by Dan
The Smallpox Edict and its willow tree,
Photo from the Pitts River collection

Michael Henss (b. 1941), the noted Swiss scholar of Tibetan art, has now at long last published the fruits of a lifetime of labor, a two-volume boxed set devoted to the architectural and artistic monuments of Central Tibet. Among the thousand and one matters in his book that might bear discussion, one thing certainly caught my eye. On page 41, M.H. notes that the Smallpox Edict — a Manchu period edict long ago studied by L.A. Waddell and more recently by H. Richardson — has something of interest to say about the historical relationship between China and Tibet. Of course it is important to bear in mind that the author of that edict was one of the official representatives of the Manchu Government, called the Ambans, stationed in Lhasa: one named Ho Lin.  In this stone inscription made in 1794 CE, Ho Lin says that during the Tang and Song dynasties Tibet was “not yet incorporated in its [the Chinese] territory,” and was “established as a vassal” only during the Qing dynasty. (n.b. The quote marks here mark words from Richardson's translation.)

Actually, in Ho Lin's estimation, Tibet would have been made a vassal of the Qing dynasty nearly one hundred years before he had his inscription made. Checking Richardson's edition of the Tibetan text, the words used there for “established as a vassal” and “incorporated into its territory” are in both cases the very same Tibetan phrase chab 'bangs-su bkod[-pa].  This phrase we could translate as was subjected politically. Nothing in the expression carries any notion of territory, let alone an incorporation of territory.*
(*Perhaps someone would care to comment on the Chinese version, and Stein's translation of it that Richardson made use of.)

The phrase dang 'gres che didn’t make sense to Richardson, so he suggested reading 'brel in place of 'gres. I suggest reading 'gros instead. The whole passage could then be translated, ‘In olden times, during the time of the Thangs and Bzungs (i.e., the Tang and Sung) kings [Tibet] had much communication with the great kingdom of China, yet it had not been made subject to her power. It was in the time of our great emperor Tha'i-tsung-'un* that [Tibet] was made subject to her power. As it has been up to the present time a little more than one hundred years...’

Richardson's reading:  སྔ་སོར་ཐངས་དང་བཟུངས་ཀྱི་རྒྱལ་པོའི་དུས་རྒྱ་ཡུལ་རྒྱལ་ཁབ་ཆེན་པོ་དང་འགྲེས་ཆེ་ཡང་ཆབ་འབངས་སུ་འཁོད་མི་འདུག་ཅིང་། ངེད་ཚོའི་གོང་མ་ཆེན་པོ་ཐའི་ཙུང་འུན་གྱི་དུས་ནས་ཆབ་འབངས་སུ་འཁོད་པ་བཅས། ད་བར་ལོ་ངོ་བརྒྱ་ལྷག་ཙམ་སོང་འདུག་པར་རྟེན།...
(*Richardson identifies as “Emperor T'ai Tsung Wên Huang Ti,” posthumous name of Abahai, the first real member of of the Ch'ing [Qing] dynastic line (reigned 1626-1643). Of course the Amban is mistaken, since at this time the Manchus had never come anywhere near Tibet, although they did offer some patronage to Tibetan Buddhist teachers [Grupper]. He is just referring to the founding of the Manchu dynastic rule over China.)


Somebody ought to do a study of the following fascinating phenomenon: I’ve noted over the years, even if I didn’t think to note down exact dates, that post-Republican China has dated Tibet’s belonging to China to [1] the Tibeto-Sinitic marriage alliances of the Tang dynasty way back in the 7th and 8th centuries. Then they moved it up to [2] the period of Eurasian ‘world domination’ by the Mongols in the 13th century. And most recently some have been saying Tibet was made part of China [3] in the Ch'ing/Manchu period, a time when another ‘national minority’ (as Tibetans, Manchus, Mongolians and Hui would later come to be labeled) ruled over the Han (i.e., Chinese). But why the sudden leap backward I’ve noticed in recent months? It seems positively counter-evolutionary. We should have a look at that.

Since the middle of April of this year, the Beijing committee that decides these things determined the new thing they’ll tell the world about Tibet is that “it has been a part of China since antiquity.”* Nicely ambiguous and so subject to interpretation, still it puts the unity of the Han and Tibetan nations so far back into unknowable history as to be unfathomable. I guess that is their motive for making this new move in their very very slow chessboard game. Sure, they hate it when we outside people comment on the matter, with their huffy none-of-your-business attitude. If we persist in our ignorance of the “truths” they so considerately extend toward us they will (with considerable regularity) pull out their ultimate wildcard and call us anti-Chinese, or even worse, accuse us of containment (whatever that means these days, if anything).
(*Truth by committee I call it. Go ahead and Schmoogle that phrase [including the quote marks] “part of China since antiquity,” then try “has always been a part of China,” and you will see what I mean about the periodization of Beijing’s eternal truths. Just about everybody there repeats what they are told to repeat (I hope you will not need to ask yourself why this is so), whether they agree with it the least bit or not; well, besides one very exceptional professor of Fudan U. by the name of Ge Jianxiong. Back in 2007 there was a lot of press [look here] about his position that China wasn’t always as big as it is right now...  Duh... Imagine that!)

The Smallpox Edict, however carved in stone it may be, reflects the views of a benevolent yet arrogant (yes, you heard right, arrogant... he calls Tibetans stupid and savage) functionary of the Manchu government from his station in Lhasa. Its date of 1794 is significant, since it comes soon after the end of the Gorkha war in 1792, and the subsequent Manchu attempt in 1793 to isolate Tibet from the countries on its southern borders, trying to gain control over Tibet’s foreign trade with South Asia (Engelhardt, p. 240). This was the time when Manchu power was at its height, when Golden Edicts were issued forbidding such normal Tibetan cultural practices as sky burial, or attempting to oversee the selection of recognized incarnations, edicts that by all accounts went unheeded in Tibet by everyone except the Amban and his coteries. So, to make clear what my main point is before this blog gets too long, the Amban Ho Lin directly contradicted presentday Beijing’s wistful notion that Tibet has been a part of China since antiquity. Ho Lin at the same time obviously had no vested interest in promoting Tibet’s independence, quite the contrary. This makes his statement that much more remarkable.


§  §  §


Afterthoughts and notes on sources:

Well worth observing, I believe, is the position on the issue of Tibet’s [in]dependent relationship with the Manchus that may be found in the geographical work by Tsenpo Nominhan (བཙན་པོ་ནོ་མོན་ཧན་), writing as he was in the same era as the Amban. He was one of the Tibetan Buddhist teachers with the closest of ties to the Manchu court, yet he was perfectly clear that Tibet was not a part of China. Find and read this lengthy essay:



Lobsang Yongdan, “Tibet Charts the World: The Btsan-po No-mon-han’s Detailed Description of the World, an Early Major Scientific Work in Tibet,” contained in: Gray Tuttle, ed., Mapping the Modern in Tibet, International Institute for Tibetan and Buddhist Studies (Andiast 2011), pp. 73-134, particularly pp. 99-100:

“Although the Btsan-po was one of the Qing Emperor’s seal-holding lamas, he did not consider Tibet to be a part of China or part of the Qing Empire.”*

(*Go to the essay itself for more about the borders between Tibet and China. He awards Tibet, and not China, the central position in Jambu Island. Just like other Tibetan historical sources, he lists both China (རྒྱ་ནག་) and Tibet (བོད་ཡུལ་) as nations and territories within a larger list of nations and territories that also include India (རྒྱ་གར་), Nepal (བལ་ཡུལ་), Mongolia (སོག་ཡུལ་ or ཧོར་ཡུལ་) among others.) 
* * *

The main sources on the Smallpox Edict that I know of are these:
L. Austin Waddell, Lhasa and Its Mysteries, Dover Publications (New York 1988), reproducing the 1905 edition, with the Smallpox Edict illustrated opposite p. 340, and discussed on p. 362.


N.V.L. Rybot, “A Small-Pox Edict Pillar at Lhasa,” Man, vol. 26 (1936), pp. 180-181.

Hugh Edward Richardson, “The Smallpox Edict of 1794 at Lhasa,” Journal of Oriental Studies, vol. 6, nos. 1/2 (1961/4), pp. 114-124.

Hugh Edward Richardson, "The Smallpox Edict of 1794 by the Amban Ho-Lin," contained in: H.E. Richardson, Ch'ing Dynasty Inscriptions at Lhasa, Serie Orientale Roma series no. 47, Istituto Italiano per il Medio ed Estremo Oriente (Rome 1974), pp. 55-61.


On political conditions at the time, and especially the Manchu containment policy regarding Tibet, see Isrun Engelhardt, “The Closing of the Gates: Tibetan-European Relations at the End of the Eighteenth Century,” contained in: Henk Blezer, ed., Tibet, Past and Present: Tibetan Studies I, Brill (Leiden 2002), pp. 229-245. Another relevant study is one by the late Anne Chayet, “À propos du règlement en 29 articles d'e l'année 1793,” Cahiers d'Extrême-Asie, vol. 15 (2005), pp. 165-186. On the Ambans and their degree of involvement in Tibetan politics, there is a remarkable new paper by Kalsang Norbu Gurung, “The Role of Ambans in the Dalai Lama Government according to the Ten-Point Edict of 1795,” contained in: C. Ramble, P. Schwieger, A. Travers, eds., Tibetans who Escaped the Historian's Net: Studies in the Social History of Tibetan Societies, Vajra Books (Kathmandu 2013), pp. 27-39.  The classic study on the Ambans is Josef Kolmas, The Ambans and Assistant Ambans of Tibet (A Chronological Study), Archiv Orientalni, Supplementa VII (Prague 1994), in 86 pages.  On early Manchu patronage of Tibetan Buddhism, see in particular Sam Grupper, “Manchu Patronage and Tibetan Buddhism during the First Half of the Ch'ing Dynasty,” Journal of the Tibet Society, vol. 4 (1984), pp. 47-75. Here you can find some information on Abahai’s support for several Buddhist teachers of the Sakyapa school. You may be interested to read the earlier Tibeto-logic blog on the issue of historical Independence dated April 15, 2008 entitled “Tibetan Independence: Testimonies from Two Professors and a Bird.” It is no doubt embarrassing to find oneself used in this way (and it is hardly the first time this has been done to European and American students of Tibet), but a press item was produced that makes as if M.H. were lending his support to Chinese rule of Tibet (just schmoogle the title “Swiss Scholar: Tibet Now No Doubt a Better Place” since for some reason I don’t relish the idea of directly linking CCTV pages). They did the same thing to Jimmy Carter and Helmut Kohl, so he would seem to be in good company.  Oh, and another matter, did you notice the "pock" marks in the stone of the inscription that half succeeded in effacing half of the inscription? There is no doubt that members of the Younghusband Expedition (Waddell being among them) shared among themselves the story that this was a result of Tibetan magical thinking, thinking that this smallpox monument, if chipped off and consumed, would protect them from smallpox. I set this story aside as one of many British stories about Tibet until such time as I find verification from a Tibetan source that there is any truth to it. Meanwhile, I will assume that all those chips were made in it because Tibetans didn’t appreciate it very much. Perhaps it wasn't so much damaged that they could not still make out the ethnic chauvinism and anti-Tibetan rhetoric of its author. But then it is only the side with the Chinese character version that is defaced (according to Rybot), and that fact could also bear some significance.

Wikipedia has a page on the “Tibetan Sovereignty Debate” (here). As is often the case in Wikis the many hands pulling it this way and that make for very choppy reading. I also have a fundamental opposition to their official opposition to what they call “research,”* thinking they could use a whole lot more of it. I’m sure the “talk” page is the more interesting one, beginning with “Opening 'Sentence' Sucks.”
(*They dismiss research under their terms “special research” and “original research,” while insisting that their writers always err on the side of generalities or what is believed to be generally accepted. This is a fundamentally conservative position that denies independent thought, retards new ideas and discourages freshly drawn conclusions based on larger bodies of data (you may want to see how Wikipedia defends its demands for “no original research” here). More particularly, in the page in question, it discourages writers from bringing forward evidence that is only available in Tibetan language [that would, after all, be “original research”], even though so few of the Tibetan histories and historical sources most germane to the issue have been translated.)


Nota bene:  

There are some who may think that since there are and have been conflicting and contradicting testimonies on the issue of Tibet’s [in]dependence that it is something indeterminate and therefore unknowable, that we should simply shrug our shoulders and give up (or pass over it in the manner of diplomats these days: Oh well, there are different sides to every issue and the truth must lie somewhere in between). 

I beg to differ. Yes, sure, we ought to hear the words of all parties in the historical “debate” but do so constantly bearing in mind who the people doing the talking were, and what their interests (and their jobs) were, in order to better comprehend who they were, what they were talking about, and what their motives were. In other words we need to approach the malleable and situational statements of the various parties historically. Doing so will surely give us a healthy skepticism when politicians of one country or another make their next pronouncements on the subject. That will help us preserve or achieve our own independence of thought. This sort of independence seems to be in short supply to judge from what I’ve been reading in the press lately. Even so, there is no good excuse for falling into agnosticism or nihilism, since when all is said and done Tibet’s own historical tradition is the one that has to carry the most weight in our thinking, and most assuredly not the self-serving historical constructions and calculated statements of a neighboring culture with its sometimes-frustrated aims to impose upon, isolate, engulf or thoroughly devour him.


Addendum:

Somebody just reminded me that some of the issues raised here have already been covered better in an essay by Elliot Sperling  published in China Perspectives back in 2009. He shows, among other things, that the views of Ge Jianxiong are not as exceptional as I had thought (and, in fact, E.S. has shown elsewhere that his views were seriously misrepresented in the world press). The essay, entitled “Tibet and China: The Interpretation of History since 1950,” is easily accessed here, and I very much recommend reading it.
This comes from Dan's Tibeto-logic blog located at Blogger.com: http://tibeto-logic.blogspot.com/
29 Jun 00:50

Wealth, trade, technological development, the emergence of cities, more comfort and consumption: For it all, we have war to thank

Wealth, trade, technological development, the emergence of cities, more comfort and consumption: For it all, we have war to thank
27 Jun 23:35

Jesus was a Jew

roverbey

Wowwwwwowwwwwwowwwwwwwwww....

Israel is a Christian nation.

25 Jun 00:41

Why are the leaders of the New York Public Library so intent on destroying one of the world’s great repositories of knowledge?

roverbey

“In the back quarter of this iconic building are stacks of books that are rarely used. We can store and get access to those books without having to take the prime space in a prime location of New York City. To the degree that we can make that space available, and replace books with people, that’s the future of where libraries are going.”

In other words… FYB

Why are the leaders of the New York Public Library so intent on destroying one of the world’s great repositories of knowledge?
23 Jun 16:25

Feminist humor

roverbey

wowwwwww

It’s funny that feminism started out as equality for women, and now it’s just about women killing their children.

22 Jun 14:56

Never judge a book

roverbey

Kind of heart-warming, actually

I am proud of myself for getting this far into college I alway thought you had to be smart to go to college, but never judge a book by its cover.

21 Jun 16:52

Delayed gratification

Projectile motion is the study of something I will write more about later.

19 Jun 14:02

John is not really dull - he may only need his eyes examined (LOC)

by The Library of Congress
roverbey

The contrast between “is” and “may” here creates productive tension.

The Library of Congress posted a photo:

John is not really dull - he may only need his eyes examined (LOC)

John is not really dull - he may only need his eyes examined

[New York] : W.P.A. Fed. Art Project, [1936 or 1937]

1 print on board (poster) : silkscreen, color.

Notes:
Date stamped on verso: Dec 1 1937.
Sponsored by Town of Hempstead, W.H. Runcie, M.D., Health Officer.
Work Projects Administration Poster Collection (Library of Congress).
Poster recommending eye examinations for children having difficulty learning, showing a woman holding an eye chart(?) in front of a boy reading a book.

Subjects:
Children--Health & welfare--New York (State)--Hempstead--1930-1940.
Children--Education--New York (State)--Hempstead--1930-1940.
Eye examinations--New York (State)--Hempstead--1930-1940.

Format: Posters--1930-1940.
Screen prints--Color--1930-1940.

Rights Info: No known restrictions on publication.

Repository: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Washington, D.C. 20540 USA

Higher resolution image is available (Persistent URL): hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3f05332

Call Number: POS - WPA - NY .01 .J64, no. 1

19 Jun 14:02

Let me do the talking! (LOC)

by The Library of Congress

The Library of Congress posted a photo:

Let me do the talking! (LOC)

Ansley, Homer,, artist.

Let me do the talking! Serve in silence /

[California] : No. Cal. WPA Art Program, [between 1941 and 1943]

1 print on board (poster) : silkscreen, color.

Notes:
Date stamped on recto: Jan 21 '43.
Work Projects Administration Poster Collection (Library of Congress).
Issued by the San Francisco Junior Chamber of Commerce.
Posters of the WPA / Christopher DeNoon. Los Angeles : Wheatly Press, c1987, no. 259
Poster encouraging citizens to be mindful of careless talk and to let the military speak for the nation, showing a large cannon.

Subjects:
World War, 1939-1945--Communications.
Artillery (Weaponry)--1940-1950.

Format: War posters--1940-1950.
Screen prints--Color--1940-1950.

Rights Info: No known restrictions on publication.

Repository: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Washington, D.C. 20540 USA

Higher resolution image is available (Persistent URL): hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3b49069

Call Number: POS - WPA - CA .A594, no. 1

19 Jun 14:01

As old as creation (LOC)

by The Library of Congress

The Library of Congress posted a photo:

As old as creation (LOC)

As old as creation Syphilis is now curable :Consult your physician /

[New York] : WPA Federal Art Project, [1936 or 1937]

1 print on board (poster) : silkscreen, color.

Notes:
Town of Hempstead, W.H. Runcie M.D. Health Officer.
Date stamped on verso: Dec 1 1937.
Work Projects Administration Poster Collection (Library of Congress).
Poster promoting treatment for syphilis, showing dinosaurs.

Subjects:
Syphilis--New York (State)--Hempstead--1930-1940.
Health care--New York (State)--Hempstead--1930-1940.
Dinosaurs--1930-1940.

Format: Posters--1930-1940.
Screen prints--Color--1930-1940.

Rights Info: No known restrictions on publication.

Repository: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Washington, D.C. 20540 USA

Higher resolution image is available (Persistent URL): hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3b48847

Call Number: POS - WPA - NY .D03, no. 3

18 Jun 03:50

grofjardanhazy: Áprilisi tréfa? - Nevetséges cigaretták |...



















grofjardanhazy:

Áprilisi tréfa? - Nevetséges cigaretták | Dohány Múzeum

Cigarettes of the Hungarian People’s Republic.

15 Jun 23:45

Trigger-unhappy | The Economist

by overbey
roverbey

This last graf captures my sentiments precisely.

At root this is a fight about power, with feelings wielded as weapons. Students should beware of winning too many victories. A perfectly safe university would not be worth attending.
16 Jun 18:29

Organ donation

Donating organs is completely free, so don’t worry if you think you can’t afford it.

04 Jun 01:19

“More than a publication, n+1 is a microculture, a whole way of intellectual life.” The magazine is 10 years old. Time to take stock

“More than a publication, n+1 is a microculture, a whole way of intellectual life.” The magazine is 10 years old. Time to take stock
14 Jun 19:17

Pro-death penalty

roverbey

Student thinks he has a rock-solid argument here.

How many executed have been arrested for murder again? That answer would be none.

12 Jun 17:54

Friend breakup

roverbey

#drama

Human beings and nature used to be best friends, but they are no longer best friends.

10 Jun 20:25

California vaccine bill clears committee | The Sacramento Bee

by russiansledges
roverbey

Vaccinate All The Brutes!

Before the hearing, hundreds of opponents gathered for a rally on the Capitol steps and cheered raucously for a group of Republican lawmakers urging them on. It was the most public instance yet of legislators joining advocates to speak against the measure. “This bill, in my opinion, is not vaccines,” Assemblyman Devon Mathis, R-Visalia, told attendees. “It is about combating an overreaching government that is infringing on our constitutional rights.” Assemblyman Jim Patterson, R-Fresno, invoked “concentration camps” and “internment camps” in suggesting non-vaccinated children would be set apart by not being allowed to attend school.
09 Jun 08:29

The Diamond Sutra on display: Frontispiece

by Vic Swift

The whole text of the earliest dated printed book — the Diamond Sutra — has been on display at the British Library for the first time over a period of eighteen months between March 2014 – August 2015.

Following extensive conservation, the Diamond Sutra scroll currently remains in separate panels giving the unique opportunity to show all the panels in turn. Each panel has been displayed for two months in the Treasures Gallery at the British Library, open to all and with free admission.

The final panel on display (June-August 2015) is the illustrated frontispiece showing the Buddha with his elderly disciple, Subhūti. The text of the sutra concerns the philosophical discussion between the Buddha and Subhūti.

See the whole of the Diamond Sutra online on the IDP website.

The Diamond Sutra was printed in AD 868 as an act of faith and piety. In this period Buddhists took advantage of printing to replicate the words and image of the buddha, but private printers at the time also used the new technology to produce texts for profit. Almanacs were immensely popular, so much so that the Chinese emperor, whose imperial astronomers produced and distributed an imperial almanac, tried to suppress their printing and sale throughout the 9th and 10th centuries.

Printed almanac. Or.8210/P.6.

Displayed alongside the Diamond Sutra will be a copy of a Chinese almanac printed just a decade later, in AD 877. It is a very different style of printing with the document split into registers showing immense detail. They include the animals of the Chinese zodiac, a diary of lucky and unlucky days, fengshui diagrams, magic charms and much more.

Sanskrit Heart Sutra with Chinese transcription. Or.12380/3500.

The display also includes two pages from a printed copy of the Heart Sutra in Sanskrit with a phonetic transcription in Chinese, an early example of Korean printing using moveable type and the earliest examples of Japanese printing, the Million Charms of Empress Shotoku.


‘The Diamond Sutra and Early Printing’

MARCH 2014 – AUGUST 2015
FREE ENTRY

Monday 09.30 - 20.00
Tuesday 09.30 - 20.00
Wednesday 09.30 - 20.00
Thursday 09.30 - 20.00
Friday 09.30 - 18.00
Saturday 09.30 - 17.00
Sunday 11.00 - 17.00
Public holidays 11.00 - 17.00

Sir John Ritblat Gallery
The British Library
96 Euston Road
London, NW1 2DB
MAP

03 Jun 01:26

Thoughts on The Kipnis Clown Show and the Drama of University Life

by overbey
roverbey

“But the free speech dimension strikes me as a critical but secondary one, with the deeper issue a form of militant paranoia and a desire to chain not just sexual violence but even discussions of sex and sexual violence to an apparatus of administrative investigations, quasi-judicial inquiries and lawsuits - making a law which is incredibly important to gender equality on campus into a plaything tribunal of fanaticism and militant derp.”

I don't think Kipnis was ever in a great deal of jeopardy. Any sanction against her on these facts would have been very hard to sustain in the face of any capable legal challenge in her defense. But that's not the point. The very idea that a professor could be hit with a Title IX investigation over an opinion article she wrote in The Chronicle of Higher Education is so palpably ridiculous that there is simply no need to go further.
01 Jun 02:57

Frenemies

roverbey

OMFG

Churchill wanted to start war between himself and Hitler. They did not have a very good friendship, I don’t know if it would even be called a friendship.They really didn’t  seem to like each other from what I read. Hitler most certainly didnt like him and the stuff that he did.

29 May 16:59

Dragon Tao Z

Tao, also known as “The Way,” is someones inner chi and one can use it, kind of like Dragon Ball Z.

29 May 15:27

My Title IX Inquisition - The Chronicle Review - The Chronicle of Higher Education

by overbey
roverbey

OK, so Kipnis’ original essay was very 1970s and very creepy with its 1970s vibe. But the fact that her essay generated TWO Title IX complaints which the university was obligated to respond to, that there were lawyers involved, is completely fucked up.

According to our campus newspaper, the mattress-carriers were marching to the university president’s office with a petition demanding "a swift, official condemnation" of my article. One student said she’d had a "very visceral reaction" to the essay; another called it "terrifying." I’d argued that the new codes infantilized students while vastly increasing the power of university administrators over all our lives, and here were students demanding to be protected by university higher-ups from the affront of someone’s ideas, which seemed to prove my point.
22 May 16:46

The Future

roverbey

Wow wow wow. That is a bold gambit.

I did not read this book “Hamlet” because I don’t like to dwell on the past, it is irrelevant, instead I am focused on the future.

23 May 21:37

Redskins

roverbey

I…
Just…
How…
Hmm.

For example, the Washington Redskins pokes fun at almost all tribes. There fore all Indians should be happy that they are being remembered. I think it is honorable for their name to be used. I understand that to the members of the tribe, all of their culture and rituals are in honor of their name. But they need to be happy that they are being remembered.

21 May 00:29

Huma Bird. Bird of paradise c. 1787-91

by overbey
roverbey

Birb of Thrones

The defeat and death of Tipu, Sultan of Mysore, and the sack of his citadel of Seringapatam in 1799 put an end to more than a decade of conflict in southern India, and pre-empted a possible military alliance between Tipu and Napoleon Bonaparte. In the heat of the action the Sultan’s magnificent treasury and library were ransacked by the British forces, and the gold coverings of his throne were cut up into small pieces for distribution as prize. The throne, which Tipu may never in fact have ascended in state, was an octagonal wooden platform raised 1.2 metres (4 feet) from the ground on eight supports in the shape of tiger legs. It was surrounded by a railing with a small jewelled tiger head above each support, and surmounted by a canopy raised on a post at the back. In the front was a life-size tiger head (later presented to William IV, now at Windsor Castle). Every element was overlaid with 2 mm (1/16 inch) gold sheet. Above the canopy hovered the huma or bird of paradise. In a letter of July 1799 to the Governor-General of India, Lord Mornington, Captain Macaulay (Private Secretary to the British Commander-in-Chief, General Harris) explained that the huma was ‘supposed to fly constantly in the Air, and never to touch the ground. It is looked upon as a Bird of happy Omen, and that every Head it overshadows will in time wear a Crown’. After the breaking up of the throne the huma had already been allocated when it was reacquired by Mornington, now Lord Mornington, Captain Macaulay for presentation to George III. The stand was made for it, by Paul Storr, after the King had passed the huma to the Queen.
18 May 18:25

Lit crit: verbs

Almost all of his sentences contains at least a verb which makes the book a series of actions. 

18 May 02:00

Kim Kardashian is the unlikely embodiment of Duchamp’s urinal. “In declaring herself, against all common sense, as art, she mocks and dares and provokes”

Kim Kardashian is the unlikely embodiment of Duchamp’s urinal. “In declaring herself, against all common sense, as art, she mocks and dares and provokes”