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05 Apr 15:43

The why, where, what and how of photobooks and what is ‘The Truth’?

by UN OF PHOTOGRAPHY

Any photographer today who finds themselves engaged with photography and photographers online, in print or in person, will find it difficult—if not impossible—to escape the presentation, distribution and critical dissection of the photobook. Social media is full of photographers promoting their self-published works as experts reveal the ‘secret’ to creating, dissecting and understanding one. Websites and blogs are dedicated to showcasing them and every month another competition or festival is announced encouraging you to enter your dummy or finished book with the hope of recognition and/or potential mainstream publication. But this was not always the case.

I have collected photobooks for many years, but I can vividly remember the first digitally printed photobook I purchased back in 1998. It was published by The Photographers Gallery in London and featured the work of the Magnum photographer Paul Fusco documenting the final train ride of Robert F. Kennedy’s body from New York to Washington D.C. It was titled RFK Funeral Train and I bought it on a limited-edition print on demand basis — only 200 were printed on a Xerox DocuColor 100 Digital Color Press. The printing was not good; it was crude and soft and the spine was weak. But today, due to its scarcity, it is a collector’s item.

At the time, I remember being dismissive of the book. The images were powerful and the layout of the book delivered the narrative simply and effectively. But I had to pay in advance, wait weeks for it to arrive and then make a second trip to pick it up. Most significantly, however, I did not believe that the process by which the book had been printed did justice to the images it contained. Of course, little did I know that what I had purchased would become a template for the future of the photobook.

I have deliberately mentioned the name of the printer used in the creation of the first edition of RFK Funeral Train because it is the process of digital printing that is fundamental to the explosion of independent photobook publishing we are experiencing today. The Photographers Gallery was not an established publishing house and neither are most of the people behind many of the photobooks currently being published. Digital printing is now the norm, and paying for a book and waiting for it to arrive is an experience that none of us question.

To help me explain where we are today with book publishing I often use the metaphor of football — soccer if you prefer — leagues, where the publishers are the teams and managers and the players are the photographers. The metaphor of league tables is not to denote quality of work but to explain an approach to the game and the medium of photography based on the financial clout of the teams involved.

The premier league includes the big-name established publishing houses that are looking for big sales, established profiles and/or a financial donation from the photographer to balance their level of risk in publishing a photobook. In the premier league, sales are king and the marketing department—amongst other various employees at the publishing house—expect to be involved in the name, cover and occasionally content of the book. However, the bigger your donation, the bigger your say will be, as the publisher’s financial exposure decreases. You should also expect Amazon metadata utilization to be part of both of these decisions.

The first division includes all of those publishers who are established, but not supported by non-photobook big sellers within their portfolios. These imprints will have limited distribution power outside of the photo community but may well have a level of prestige based on their previous publications which may be perceived as a stepping stone for a photographer’s career path. These publishers can also expect you to make a financial donation to publish your book. Either through your own funds, via a crowd-sourcing site and/or through a grant or bursary. These publishers are serious about photography and the intentions of the photographer in achieving the finished book they want, but are often restricted by their lack of distribution and marketing power.

The second division is made up of the many, mainly American, academic and museum publishers creating books connected with archives, exhibitions, academia and research. They exist within their own worlds reliant on independent funding and with no requirement to record substantial sales outside of their immediate sphere of influence. They do not need reviews, sales or to see a profit.

All of the players in these divisions may expect a level of independent funding to publish and will risk as little of their own money as possible. Where that funding comes from depends on the publisher, the work and the expectation of the photographer of the finished artefact. The sales expectations of the publishers—whatever league they are in—will rest in the very low thousands at best, even for ‘big’ name photographers, and marketing spend and activity will be minimal, if it exists at all.

I live in a medium-size UK city outside of London filled with photographers, filmmakers and associated creative industries, and yet the two main chain bookstores in the city — Waterstones and Foyles — have only eight feet of shelving between them dedicated to books associated with photography. Photobook sales outside of specialist book stores and galleries reside firmly online, and it is this fact that brings me to the third division, where photographers are fully utilizing the new digital tools available to them.

It has never been cheaper or easier to create and print a photobook. It has also never been easier to set yourself up as a publishing company. Choose a name for your publishing company, set up a blog, buy some ISDN numbers and create accounts with Instagram, Twitter and Facebook with which to build an online community, and slowly but surely with persistence and hard work you will be able to create a publishing profile. I’m talking about creating a publishing company here, not ‘just’ self-publishing your own work. The same rules apply to publishing your own work, but I want to make you think about that process differently.

A publishing company is judged by the titles they publish and the people they publish. So why not put your work in the company you want it to be seen in, whilst also showcasing the work of photographers whom you respect and admire? Two examples of how to do this have been created in the UK by Craig Aitkinson with www.caferoyalbooks.com and Iain Sarjeant with http://anotherplacepress.bigcartel.com. Both of these photographer/publishers are one-person operations based on passions for specific areas of photography. Their books are published as small print runs, well-designed and printed and positioned at low, affordable price points. They are self-financed, but their titles sell out thanks to intelligent online marketing and an engaged community that share the publishers tastes in photography.

These publishers are taking control of the publishing of their own work by including it alongside that of other photographers they choose to collaborate with and whom chose to collaborate with them. In the case of Craig, this has included collaborations with Magnum photographers Martin Parr, George Rodger and David Hurn, as well as Homer Sykes, John Bulmer, Arthur Tress and Simon Roberts, amongst many others. Whilst Iain collaborates with those exploring landscape photography such as Dan Wood, Cody Cobb, Al Brydon, Lark Foord and Nicky Hirst.

These books have an audience but the ease by which photobooks can be made today can too easily seduce photographers into creating and paying for books that are ill-conceived and under-developed. In this case, the expectation for such books to sell and/or raise the photographer’s profile is always going to go unrealized.

What is considered to be self-publishing today was termed ‘vanity publishing’ in the past, and—as the use of the word ‘vanity’ suggests—those publications were considered to have little more reason to exist than to fulfill the expectations of their creator. Today we are comfortable with self-publishing, but it is too easy to step over the line into the vanity project without being aware of the fact, and it is at this point that the audience is lost.

I often write about the importance of narrative to today’s professional photographer and the book is the most obvious vehicle for that understanding of narrative to be showcased. For the story to be told, and the construction of that story to develop through images, the storyteller requires a sense of narrative purpose. And yet this responsibility to communicate is too often ignored, resulting in non-communicative confused photobooks.

A book exists away from the photographer, and therefore it needs to be able to speak for itself. If it does not do so it fails in its basic purpose for existing.

Of course, the first step in creating a photobook is ensuring that you have a story to tell. Without that, everything I have outlined in this article is irrelevant as part of your process. But it is not irrelevant in finding a story, developing a process and understanding the realities of photobook publishing.

There is no great secret to creating a successful photobook, just as there is no great mystery to publishing. Success in both depends upon a level of understanding of the hard work required to create an engaging visual narrative and the process in presenting that narrative to a potential audience. The digital environment may have introduced a number of short cuts and made the once impossible achievable, but the ingredients of a successful photobook remain the same today as they have always been: a good story, strong images and a route to market.

Grant Scott is the founder/curator of United Nations of Photography,
a Senior Lecturer in Editorial and Advertising Photography at the University of Gloucestershire, a working photographer, and the author of Professional Photography: The New Global Landscape Explained (Focal Press 2014) and The Essential Student Guide to Professional Photography (Focal Press 2015). His next book #New Ways of Seeing: The Democratic Language of Photography will be published by Bloomsbury Academic in 2018.

You can follow the progress of his documentary film, Do Not Bend: The Photographic Life of Bill Jay at
donotbendfilm.com.

You can follow
Grant on Twitter and on Instagram @UNofPhoto.

Text © Grant Scott 2017

If you liked this article, click and hold 👏 below so others will see it.


The why, where, what and how of photobooks and what is ‘The Truth’? was originally published in Witness on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

05 Mar 16:44

The Untold Quiet of Kurdish Iraq

by By Kenneth R. Rosen
Lam Duc-Hien, a Vietnamese photographer, first imagined Iraq to be full of tanks and violence. But after documenting the Kurdish region of Iraq for more than two decades, he found something very different.
18 Jan 10:31

What’s this big button?

by CommitStrip

11 Jan 14:10

Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal - Justice

by tech@thehiveworks.com


Click here to go see the bonus panel!

Hovertext:
This comic inspired by the delightful 'In Defense of Flogging' by Peter Moskos.

New comic!
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Geeks of MIT and London! We need your submissions to make our shows happen! Check it out!

05 Jan 19:27

Jindřich Štreit – Inspiration From Masters Of Photography

by Admin

Jindřich Štreit is a Czech Photographer. He is born 5th September, 1946 in Vsetín. He concentrates on documenting the rural life and people of Czech villages. He is considered one of the most important exponents of Czech documentary photography.

He began taking photographs in 1964, during his studies at the Pedagogical Faculty of Palacký University in Olomouc. Following his graduation he worked as a teacher in Rýmařov; later he became director of the school in Sovinec and Jiříkov. In addition to his profession, Štreit actively participated in public life. As a local chronicler he documented the everyday events and life of Czech villages under the communist regime.

Jindrich Streit - Inspiration From Masters Of Photography

© Jindřich Štreit

In the late 1970s, he approach to photography began to change. He studied at the Institute of Art Photography in Brno. He graduated from the Institute with a cycle of theatrical photography. At the same time he continued expanding his cycle of everyday life of the villages in the foothills of the Jeseníky Mountains. Additionally, he helped organize cultural life in the region; he participated in organizing exhibitions and concerts.

As of 2010, Štreit works as a teacher at the Institute of Creative Photography of Silesian University in Opava

Jindrich Streit - Inspiration From Masters Of Photography

© Jindřich Štreit

Jindrich Streit - Inspiration From Masters Of Photography

© Jindřich Štreit

Jindrich Streit - Inspiration From Masters Of Photography

© Jindřich Štreit

Jindrich Streit - Inspiration From Masters Of Photography

© Jindřich Štreit

Jindrich Streit - Inspiration From Masters Of Photography

© Jindřich Štreit

Jindrich Streit - Inspiration From Masters Of Photography

© Jindřich Štreit

Jindrich Streit - Inspiration From Masters Of Photography

© Jindřich Štreit

Jindrich Streit - Inspiration From Masters Of Photography

© Jindřich Štreit

Jindrich Streit - Inspiration From Masters Of Photography

© Jindřich Štreit

Jindrich Streit - Inspiration From Masters Of Photography

© Jindřich Štreit

Jindrich Streit - Inspiration From Masters Of Photography

© Jindřich Štreit

Jindrich Streit - Inspiration From Masters Of Photography

© Jindřich Štreit

Jindrich Streit - Inspiration From Masters Of Photography

© Jindřich Štreit

Jindrich Streit - Inspiration From Masters Of Photography

© Jindřich Štreit

Jindrich Streit - Inspiration From Masters Of Photography

© Jindřich Štreit

Jindrich Streit - Inspiration From Masters Of Photography

© Jindřich Štreit

Jindrich Streit - Inspiration From Masters Of Photography

© Jindřich Štreit

Jindrich Streit - Inspiration From Masters Of Photography

© Jindřich Štreit

Jindrich Streit - Inspiration From Masters Of Photography

© Jindřich Štreit

Jindrich Streit - Inspiration From Masters Of Photography

© Jindřich Štreit

Jindrich Streit - Inspiration From Masters Of Photography

© Jindřich Štreit

Jindrich Streit - Inspiration From Masters Of Photography

© Jindřich Štreit

Jindrich Streit - Inspiration From Masters Of Photography

© Jindřich Štreit

Jindrich Streit - Inspiration From Masters Of Photography

© Jindřich Štreit

Jindrich Streit - Inspiration From Masters Of Photography

© Jindřich Štreit

You can find Jindřich Štreit on the web:

Copyrights:
All the pictures in this post are copyrighted Jindřich Štreit. Their reproduction, even in part, is forbidden without the explicit approval of the rightful owners.

03 Jan 15:53

Who put the ‘free’ in freelance?

by Frontline Freelance
© Cassandra Vinograd

Why we can’t subsist on subsistence journalism

Written by John D McHugh

Freelance journalists voluntarily chose to endure innumerable difficulties and risks in their career, but debilitating penury should not be one of them. The financial reality for freelancers has become so bad that many are now practicing what I call “subsistence journalism”. Low pay and poor working conditions mean they have to make constant compromises in their personal lives in order to continue pursuing their profession. They live in shared houses in war-zones to keep costs down, and share fixers, translators, and taxis. Often there is no actual home to go to, with prized possessions stored in their parents’ house or a friend’s attic. Some even eschew relationships or children because the choice between subsistence journalism and familial financial commitments is so stark.

And yet, freelance journalism makes up more and more of the news we consume, even as the number of staff positions continues to shrink. How have we gotten ourselves into this mess? Despite the freelancer’s propensity to place all the blame at the feet of editors and news outlets, I think we have to take our share of responsibility.

The truth is, many freelance journalists are just not very good at freelancing. I realize this is not going to be a popular thing to say, and I may be dismissed by some as disputatious and cantankerous, but it needs to be discussed. The reason, I believe, that so many freelance journalists struggle in their career is simple: they focus too much on the ‘journalist’ part of their job title, and not enough on the ‘freelance’ bit.

There are many complex definitions of journalism, but in essence, regardless of medium, it boils down to “find story, tell story”. I’m not saying it’s easy, but we all know what it entails. The definition of freelance, in the context of freelance journalism, constitutes everything else we have to do: researching, planning, pitching, marketing, pricing, booking travel, buying insurance, risk assessment, archiving, invoicing, chasing payment, chasing payment again, paying bills, paying taxes, etc.

There are consequences associated with under-performing in each and every one of those freelance tasks, but it is poor pricing that paves the way to poverty. Deciding on a day rate shouldn’t be complicated, and there are lots of great tutorials available to freelancers to help them calculate what they should be charging. The general rule is to work out how much you want/need to earn annually, then work out how many days you want to work. From there, calculate how many of those days will be taken up with all those freelance tasks (marketing, admin, etc) and subtract them from the number of days you have allocated for commissions. The remainder is the number of days you have to earn your annual target. Divide that annual target by your available work days, and you have your basic day rate.

© Alice Driver

But this is where I believe the big mistake is made. Too many freelancers charge only for their time. As I see it, freelancers have three major commodities: time, skill, and knowledge.

Time—as we have seen—is limited, and so we must charge for it carefully to ensure that we earn enough to complete all our other freelance tasks.

Skill is the ability to perform our job, and the more experience we have, the better we are at that job. This is why a fresh-faced young journalist finds it harder to get those challenging commissions than a grizzled old hand. Skill has real value, and it’s what every commissioning editor is looking for (even if they don’t want to pay for it).

Knowledge is built up when working specific stories or beats, often over long periods, and its worth is inestimable. I covered the war in Afghanistan for years, and am still deeply immersed in the story. I’ve met and interviewed various high-profile players in the political world, and I have good contacts in the military. I also know business people, farmers, fixers, translators, etc, and this knowledge gives me an insight into the challenges the country faces. This is why I regularly get contacted by commissioning editors looking for someone to cover a particular Afghan story.

So, I believe we need to take a more complex view of our pricing. I also believe as freelancers we need to talk to each other more openly. I’m not suggesting price fixing, but an honest conversation about what we think is a fair price for our work. Too often freelancers hide the fact that they are being paid badly, whether through embarrassment or shame, but pretending otherwise does our entire community a disservice.

@Cengiz Yar

As an example, I received a phone call about a commercial job relating to the filming of a war movie in the UK at the end of last year. A very charming PR woman whispered sweet nothings in my ear, telling me how amazing my Afghanistan archive was, how appropriate it would be to have a photojournalist experienced in war to photograph their movie set, how desperate they were to work with me, how they hoped it would be the start of an exciting relationship, etc, etc, but when I quoted them my price for corporate work they suddenly started telling me that they normally get a unit photographer to do it for £400, all inclusive, and they would also need to own the copyright to all the images. Well, I’d like to say I demurely declined, but those of you who know me will have a better idea of how the conversation went. Suffice to say I told them their fee was an insult, I wouldn’t take the job, and I would actively discourage others from working with them.

A few weeks later I saw another news photographer I know post photos of himself covered in mud after a hard day’s shooting in the film’s trenches. I mentioned my own exchange with the company, and said I hoped that my rejection had made them realize the error of their ways and that he had been paid properly. His defensive reply suggested to me that that was not the case. The exchange was unfortunate because I wasn’t trying to criticize, or impugn his reputation. I just wanted to highlight the fact that these jobs may seem glamorous to some, especially the young trying to carve out a career, but the sad reality is that pay is collapsing more and more each year while the demands for copyright increase. Posting selfies of the job, telling what fun it was, and receiving replies from people saying how lucky the photographer is, only serves to further hide the problems in our industry.

Freelancers have far more power than they realize. They just need to rethink what they are selling because it isn’t words, or photos, or video. It’s their time, and skill, and knowledge. Clients will always try to get the best deal possible, but if a freelancer can articulate what their value is, there is more likelihood of getting paid accordingly. And if the client still says they can’t raise the price, then freelancers really need to start saying no to badly paid work. Because, in the end, subsistence journalism simply isn’t sustainable.

John D McHugh is a multimedia freelance photojournalist, filmmaker and a board member of the Frontline Freelance. John D has worked extensively in Afghanistan since early 2006, he produces half-hour films for the People and Power strand on Al Jazeera English, as well as continuing to produce photojournalism and multimedia for magazines and newspapers. He is also a founder of Verifeye Media which is a technology driven visual news agency for freelance journalists

If you liked this article, click and hold 👏 below so others will see it.


Who put the ‘free’ in freelance? was originally published in Witness on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

14 Nov 15:19

The Architecture of Hong Kong As You’ve Never Seen It Before

by Ellyn Kail

Over the last few years, the dense, vertical architecture of Hong Kong has enchanted many photographers. Michael Wolf and Greer Muldowney studied the region’s urban density. Romain Jacquet-Lagreze photographed the buildings during “blue hour,” when silver moonlight mixes with the fluorescent light pouring out from countless windows. Peter Steinhauer documented the construction process.

Most of these photographers do not fly drones, and most of them have not lived in Hong Kong for their entire lives. These are two things that set photographer Andy Yeung apart. He’s been shooting this place and its architecture from the sky for the last few years, and he’s learned everything from the right time to launch to the proper spots to fly. In fact, in order to avoid electromagnetic interference, he’s been known to take off from a mountain peak.

Walled City, Yeung’s latest body of aerial work, draws its title and inspiration from the Kowloon Walled City. Before it was demolished in the early 1990s, the Kowloon Walled City housed an estimated 33,000 people in only 6.4 acres of land, making it about 119 times as dense as modern-day NYC. Relatively isolated from the rest of the world, the walled city was for the most part ungoverned, and crime-rates were high, though residents managed to set up and maintain small businesses, shops, and factories.

Although the Kowloon Walled City no longer exists, Yeung recognizes symbolic echoes of the place throughout his homeland. According to some reports, sunlight was blocked out by the walled city’s buildings. When photographer Greg Girard made pictures there, he told Business Insider, “It was nighttime all the time in there.” Of course, people in Hong Kong today have access to the sun, but it’s still crowded near to the point of bursting. In many modern high-rise buildings, Yeung says, “the only view out the window is the neighbor’s window.”

Still, Yeung hasn’t lost hope for Hong Kong. Living in such dense conditions poses serious problems, of course, but the photographer also finds beauty in the chaos. “I have noticed that even though Hong Kong is filled with buildings and living space is very cramped, people manage to find a way to live in harmony with each other and make the best use of the land,” he tells me.

All images © Andy Yeung

The post The Architecture of Hong Kong As You’ve Never Seen It Before appeared first on Feature Shoot.

13 Nov 20:59

Angel Boligan

20 Oct 11:30

Winning Photos Of International Drone Photography Contest 2017

by Admin

Here are the winning photos of 4th annual International Drone Photography Contest 2017. There are thousands of photographs submitted around the world, the contest is judged by National Geographic Deputy Director Patrick Witty and Photo editor Jeff Heimsath as well as Emanuela Ascoli, Photo editor of National Geographic France and Dronestagram.

For More Info: Dronestagr.am

1st Prize Winner – Nature: Provence, summer trim by jcourtial

1st Prize Winner – Nature: Provence, summer trim by jcourtial

2nd Prize Winner – Nature: Infinite Road to Transylvania by Calin Stan

2nd Prize Winner – Nature: Infinite Road to Transylvania by Calin Stan

3rd Prize Winner – Nature: Ice formation by Florian

3rd Prize Winner – Nature: Ice formation by Florian

1st Prize Winner – Category People: End of the line by Martin Sanchez

1st Prize Winner – Category People: End of the line by Martin Sanchez

2nd Prize Winner – Category People: Waterlily by helios1412

2nd Prize Winner – Category People: Waterlily by helios1412

3rd Prize Winner – Category People: La Vijanera by feelingmovie

3rd Prize Winner – Category People: La Vijanera by feelingmovie

1st Prize Winner – Category Urban: Concrete Jungle by bachirm

1st Prize Winner – Category Urban: Concrete Jungle by bachirm

2nd Prize Winner – Category Urban: Dawn on Mercury Tower by alexeygo

2nd Prize Winner – Category Urban: Dawn on Mercury Tower by alexeygo

3rd Prize Winner – Category Urban: Peace by luckydron

3rd Prize Winner – Category Urban: Peace by luckydron

Special Category: Creativity – Two Moo by LukeMaximoBell

Special Category: Creativity - Two Moo by LukeMaximoBell

Special Category: Creativity – Ugo le marin by rga

Special Category: Creativity - Ugo le marin by rga

Special Category: Next Level By macareuxprod

Special Category: Next Level By macareuxprod

 

31 Aug 13:47

Supervillain Plan

Someday, some big historical event will happen during the DST changeover, and all the tick-tock articles chronicling how it unfolded will have to include a really annoying explanation next to their timelines.
23 Aug 08:39

Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal - Job

by tech@thehiveworks.com


Click here to go see the bonus panel!

Hovertext:
The annoying thing about political economy textbooks is that the letters only appear when the Black Candle is lit beneath a Blood Moon.

New comic!
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30 Jun 18:09

The Apprehension Engine: An Instrument Designed to Play the Music of Nightmares

by Kate Sierzputowski

Movie composer Mark Korven wanted to craft the perfect sounds for horror movies, but the instruments he needed didn’t exist, and he was tired of using the same digital samples. To produce the original effects needed for evoking breathtaking moments of suspension, he teamed up with guitar maker Tony Duggan-Smith to craft an original instrument that would better aid in manufacturing fear. The Apprehension Engine is that tool, a mechanism built with several bowed metal rulers, spring reverbs, a few long metal rods, and other attachments that allow for spooky interludes and effects.

“A normal instrument, you are playing it and expecting it to have a sound that is pleasing,” said Korven to Great Big Story, “but with an instrument like this, the goal is to produce sounds, that in this case, are disturbing.”

The Apprehension Engine expresses the emotions that cannot be expressed in other ways, triggering fear with intense sonic methods. You can listen to more music by the machine tuned to provoke horror in the video below. (via Great Big Story)

30 Jun 18:06

Rock Sculptures Suspended Within Bell Jars by Their Own Weight by Dan Grayber

by Kate Sierzputowski

Cavity Mechanism #12 w/ Glass Dome. 2013. Mixed. 23″ x 13″ x 13″. All images via Dan Grayber.

Dan Grayber‘s works exist at the intersection of sculpture and physics, pieces carefully designed to solve the problems created by their own existence. The sculptures each include a rock suspended within a glass enclosure, the rock’s weight perfectly balanced by the mechanisms, systems, and pulleys that surround it.

Grayber relates this play of tension and balance to personal relationships, which serves as another influence to his work outside of visual interests in industrial design, construction machinery, and the children’s game Cat’s Cradle.

Cavity Mechanism #6, from 2009, [seen below] is one of the most obvious pieces to speak about interpersonal relationships that I’ve made,” said Grayber to Venison Magazine. “There are two identical mechanisms inside of a glass display dome, and one small cable that runs between the two mechanisms. This cable holds all of the tension between the two mechanisms, and they both need to remain in place to maintain the tension. I was really thinking about co-dependence when I made the piece. If either mechanism were to slip, or the connection between them to break, it would cause both to fail.”

You can see more of Grayber’s experiments in equilibrium on his Instagram and Facebook. (via Boing Boing and Makezine)

Cavity Mechanism #21. 2016. Mixed. 13" x 14" x 14".

Cavity Mechanism #21. 2016. Mixed. 13″ x 14″ x 14″

Cavity Mechanism #24. 2016. Mixed. 13.5" x 6.5" x 6.5".

Cavity Mechanism #24. 2016. Mixed. 13.5″ x 6.5″ x 6.5″

Cavity Mechanism #18. 2015. Mixed. 11" x 5" x 5"

Cavity Mechanism #18. 2015. Mixed. 11″ x 5″ x 5″

Cavity Mechanism #23. 2016. Mixed. 7.5" x 5" x 5"

Cavity Mechanism #23. 2016. Mixed. 7.5″ x 5″ x 5″

Display Case Mechanism #6. 2016. Mixed. 24.5" x 16" x 11"

Display Case Mechanism #6. 2016. Mixed. 24.5″ x 16″ x 11″

Display Case Mechanism #6. 2016. Mixed. 24.5" x 16" x 11"

Display Case Mechanism #6. 2016. Mixed. 24.5″ x 16″ x 11″

Cavity Mechanism #20. 2016. Mixed. 29.5" x 12" x 12".

Cavity Mechanism #20. 2016. Mixed. 29.5″ x 12″ x 12″

30 Jun 18:01

Sheena Liam’s Flowing Thread Embroidery

by Brit Seaton

During the quieter moments of the day, when model Sheena Liam is somewhere between travelling and photoshoots, she picks up her embroidery hoop and creates portraits of girls with flowing thread hair. The project has enabled Liam to explore her own taste for art direction, and each embroidered piece appears as an inventive contemporary approach to a traditional craft. Liam’s simple line drawings, created with a needle and thread, are layered with a technique of allowing the thread to sit loose against and beyond the canvas. This graces Liam’s work with another dimension, through the impression of flowing hair. The girls in each frame embrace this new possibility of interaction–they appear to be readjusting the thread, cutting it with tiny scissors and even dipping the ends in noodle soup. This endearing play with portraiture is explained by Liam as bringing “a certain sort of soul to the pieces.”

All images © Sheena Liam

30 Jun 17:55

Polluted Water Popsicles: Faux Frozen Treats Highlight Taiwan’s Water Pollution Problem

by Kate Sierzputowski

via @bebeelai

via @bebeelai

Focused on environmental change rather than flavor, art students Hung I-chen, Guo Yi-hui, and Cheng Yu-ti from the National Taiwan University of the Arts concocted a line of “frozen treats” titled Polluted Water Popsicles. The group collected polluted water from 100 locations in Taiwan, first freezing the collected sewage samples and then preserving their creations in polyester resin.

At first glance the visually pleasing treats seem to imitate the aesthetic of recent craft and artisanal food trends. However on closed inspection you can identify the trash contained within each mold—bits of plastic, bottle caps, and wrappers lying within the popsicles’ murky waters.

The project is intended to spread awareness about water pollution and its deep effect on our world’s population. The 100 pieces, which also included designed wrappers, was nominated for the Young Pin Design Award and featured in the New Generation of Design Exhibition this May at the Taipei World Trade Center. You can view more of the creatively designed inedible works in the video below. More information about the project can be found on the group’s Facebook. (via Mashable and Quartz)

via @fengfeng210

via @fengfeng210

via @_rokaro_

via @_rokaro_

30 Jun 16:56

Towering Murals by Blu on the Streets of Italy Confront Environmental and Societal Woes

by Christopher Jobson

La Cuccanga, 2017

From climate change to capitalism run amok, street artist Blu (previously) pulls no punches in his soaring multi-story murals on the streets of Italy. While mixed with a healthy dose of sarcasm and humor, the inspiration behind each artwork is anything but funny as he translates searing critiques into aesthetically beautiful paintings. For instance a 2016 piece criticizing housing problems in the Celadina district of Bergamo, Italy depicts cramped residents as a brightly hued rainbow but leaves a small group of authorities in the lower right completely devoid of color. Collected here is a selection of murals from the last year, you can see more detailed shots by flipping through his blog. You can also get an idea of how he works—perched on a tiny suspended seat—in this short GIF.

Porto Torres, 2016

Celadina, 2016

Catina, 2016

Alta Voracita, 2016

30 Jun 16:37

Still Photos of Jupiter Taken by the Juno Spacecraft Set in Motion by Sean Doran

by Christopher Jobson

NASA’s Juno spacecraft launched in 2011, arriving at Jupiter in July of 2016 to begin a series of what will eventually be 12 orbits around the Solar System’s largest planet. The path selected for this particular mission is a wide polar orbit, most of which is spent well away from Jupiter. But once every 53 days Juno screams from top to bottom across the surface of the gaseous planet, recording data and snapping photographs for two hours. It takes around 1.5 days to download the six megabytes of data collected during the transit.

Juno only takes a handful of still photographs each time it passes Jupiter, all of which are made available to the public. Lucky for us Sean Doran stitched together the images from Juno’s last transit (colorized by Gerald Eichstädt) to create an approximate video/animation of what it looks like to fly over the giant planet. Music added by Avi Solomon.

30 Jun 16:31

Hand-Sewn Hairstyles That Cascade From Embroidered Hoops by Sheena Liam

by Kate Sierzputowski

Fashion model and embroidery artist Sheena Liam hand sews images of women whose hair seems to gracefully dangle from each of her 2D surfaces, Liam using black thread as a substitute for her subjects’ long locks. The works are all completed and displayed on embroidery hoops, with hair styles extending from the women in french braids, messy buns, and long ponytails. In one particular design, tiny pieces of thread are seen attached to the wall below the hoop, creating the illusion that the embroidered woman above is messily trimming her bangs.

Liam creates relatable, solitary moments within each hand sewn hoop. You can see more of her elegant designs, as well as snapshots from her travels, on her Instagram. (via Teen Vogue)

19 Apr 08:47

Wandering Along The Moroccan Mountains With Nina Keinrath

by Clara Renner

Born in Vienna, Austria the 23-year-old film-maker and photographer Nina Keinrath chooses to capture the calmness of her surroundings. 

Read more

14 Apr 11:28

‘Home Less’ By Photographer Nelson Garrido

by Paula Lou Riebschläger

In his picture series ‘Home Less’ photographer Nelson Garrido shows the impact of financial crisis on Portuguese properties. He shot just one picture a day while capturing various abandoned houses.

Read more

12 Jan 18:49

Your Guide to Boiling Pots

by Doug
Nuno Cruz

Just like quantum mechanics

12 Dec 21:38

The Right Place

As a result of the economic crisis, an increasing number of families have started living on the streets using caravans, campers and sometimes even cars as a shelter. In some way this phenomenon is reshaping the idea of 'home'. Torre Angela. A suburb in the extreme periphery of Rome. In a park lot reserved for taxi there is a little caravan which is not used for cheerful holidays but it's a proper 'home' for an Italian couple hit by the great economic crisis. This is the place where Tommaso and Donatella live and fight their struggle to survive. He was a carpenter and she was a hairdresser but they had to retire from their job because of the crisis. Tommaso is a disabled person so they were assigned for social housing but their place has been illegally occupied and they have never retrieved their house. They lived in their car with two dogs for ten months. In spite of all the adversities they held their dignity and a strong will to go on so that they decided to transform the caravan in their new house. They live with a minimum retirement pension and Donatella does little tailoring works. Sometimes they also benefit from the help and solidarity of other residents that love this family and consider them as a symbol of this quarter. Also the authorities who tried to remove them at the beginning are now tolerating this 'strange' presence. Tommaso opened up his first carpenter's shop in this quarter and his memories flow very fast from the beginnings to the happy moments of his life...the wedding, the family, his sons and daughters, until their actual situation. Talking about their story help them to ease their pain and to find out the strenght to look ahead and to care about themselves and try not to be a burden for their sons and daughters. The door of their caravan is always open and they are ready to make a good coffee to share with friend and to enjoy the company. The famous Le Corbusier's quote 'A house is a machine for living in' seems to be written to describe Tommaso and Donatella's story. Home is the place where we come back, it's a shelter and protection from the external agents, and that is what Tommaso and Donatella found in a camper: their right place.
24 Mar 10:18

Real Life Tokyo vs. Anime Tokyo [Pics]

by Geeks are Sexy

I have never seen The Garden of the Words, but as far as anime movies go, it’s apparently one of the most beautiful movies of the genre you can see. In the picture gallery below, you can compare some of the visuals of the film with their real life equivalent in Tokyo. Please note that in all of the pictures, the top section is from the anime, and the bottom one from a real photo of the location.

tokyo1

tokyo2

tokyo3

tokyo4

tokyo5

tokyo6

tokyo7

[Source: Nijipoi (Japanese) | Via GT]

The post Real Life Tokyo vs. Anime Tokyo [Pics] appeared first on Geeks are Sexy Technology News.

21 Mar 14:14

World’s Tiniest Rube Goldberg Machine is Made from Mechanical Watch Parts [Video]

by Geeks are Sexy

I’m sure you’ve all seen plenty of Rube Goldberg machines on the web in the past, some of them as big as a whole warehouse. However, in this video, Seiko presents us what is probably the world’s tiniest Rube Goldberg machine, made entirely from mechanical watch parts.

[Seiko Website AD Gallery]

The post World’s Tiniest Rube Goldberg Machine is Made from Mechanical Watch Parts [Video] appeared first on Geeks are Sexy Technology News.

02 Mar 11:45

When Scientists Attack

by JLister

Illustrator Diego Sanches has put together a series of pixel art for a forthcoming game featuring famous scientists, each of whom has special attacks based on their work. They include Charles Darwin using evolution:

darwinevolve

Stephen Hawking using a wormhole:

hawkinghole

And Isaac Newton using gravity:

newtongravity

Check out Diego’s site for the full set of animation.

[Via: Nerd Approved]

The post When Scientists Attack appeared first on Geeks are Sexy Technology News.

24 Feb 11:46

This Microscopic View of a Spider Embryo is Strangely Adorable

by Christopher Jobson
Nuno Cruz

head crab!!!

spider-embryo

Spider embryo. Molecular characterization and embryonic origin of the eyes in the common house spider Parasteatoda tepidariorum. Göttingen University.

Taken from recent research into the development of eyes in spiders, this microscopic image shows what a common house spider looks like as it develops inside an egg. For some reason, it’s disturbingly… cute? This little cthulhu-like spider embryo is nearing the final stage before hatching and appears to be stuck in a tiny self hug. You can learn more about the embryonic origin of eyes in common house spider over on BioMed Central. (via Reddit, Göttingen University)

08 Feb 10:44

Mind-blowing Black And White Street Photos Of Hong Kong In The 1950s Captured By A Teenager

by Admin

These amazing street photos of Hong Kong catured by Self taught Chinese photographer Fan Ho. He arrived from Shanghai in 1949 and he fascinated by streets of Hong Kong. These Photos are part of his book “A Hong Kong Memoir“.

More Info : Modernbook (h/t: Wherecoolthingshappen)

Black And White Street Photos Of Hong Kong In The 1950s

Black And White Street Photos Of Hong Kong In The 1950s

Black And White Street Photos Of Hong Kong In The 1950s

Black And White Street Photos Of Hong Kong In The 1950s

Black And White Street Photos Of Hong Kong In The 1950s

Black And White Street Photos Of Hong Kong In The 1950s

Black And White Street Photos Of Hong Kong In The 1950s

Black And White Street Photos Of Hong Kong In The 1950s

Black And White Street Photos Of Hong Kong In The 1950s

Black And White Street Photos Of Hong Kong In The 1950s

Black And White Street Photos Of Hong Kong In The 1950s

Black And White Street Photos Of Hong Kong In The 1950s

Black And White Street Photos Of Hong Kong In The 1950s

Black And White Street Photos Of Hong Kong In The 1950s

Black And White Street Photos Of Hong Kong In The 1950s

Black And White Street Photos Of Hong Kong In The 1950s

Black And White Street Photos Of Hong Kong In The 1950s

Black And White Street Photos Of Hong Kong In The 1950s

Black And White Street Photos Of Hong Kong In The 1950s

Black And White Street Photos Of Hong Kong In The 1950s

Black And White Street Photos Of Hong Kong In The 1950s

05 Feb 10:41

Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal - Divine Intervention

by admin@smbc-comics.com

Hovertext: I eagerly await your email about how, actually, the rock must contain radioactive elements.


New comic!
Today's News:
10 Jan 14:59

Judgment Day

It took a lot of booster rockets, but luckily Amazon had recently built thousands of them to bring Amazon Prime same-day delivery to the Moon colony.
04 Jan 11:17

Twenty Russians wanted for questioning in MH17 downing

by Janene Pieters

One of about 20 Russian soldiers fired the BUK missile that brought down flight MH17 in July 2014, according to international research collective Bellingcat. All of the 20 soldiers know who gave the orders and who actually pressed the button, Eliot Higgins, founder of Bellingcat, said

The post Twenty Russians wanted for questioning in MH17 downing appeared first on NL Times.