Shared posts

22 Nov 00:05

Photo



18 Nov 03:30

Fleeting

by Lunarbaboon

16 Nov 09:48

Adam 2.0

Adam 2.0
12 Nov 19:00

batsvsupes: bombed









batsvsupes:

bombed

12 Nov 12:55

Série de zumbis

by Will Tirando

zumbis série TV televisão the walking dead câmeras cinegrafistas

09 Nov 20:15

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09 Nov 11:14

1583 – Enquanto isso, no ENEM

by Carlos Ruas

2747

09 Nov 22:40

Color Ballpoint Pen Drawings by Nicolas V. Sanchez

by Christopher Jobson

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Artist Nicolas V. Sanchez fills entire sketchbooks with drawings of the world around him rendered in precise color ballpoint. Portraits of families page by page, sprawling scenes of rugged farms and livestock, and near photographic recollections of people and places from residencies in the Dominican Republic and China. Sanchez often explores the roots of his own identity, delving into a bi-cultural upbringing that spans from the American midwest to his family’s rural history in Mexico.

In addition to his exacting pen work, Sanchez is also a painter and works in a distinct style that’s quite different from his ballpoint pen sketches. The sketchbooks help him work through ideas to determine if they eventually meant for a larger canvas, or if they’re meant to exist only in the pages of a book.

Filmmaker Jesse Brass recently sat down to talk with Sanchez in his New York studio for this interview entitled Resolve.

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06 Nov 11:39

Science: Religion makes you an asshole

by René

No shit, sherlock: Does religion make kids less generous? [Yup.] Man vergleiche diese Ergebnisse bitte auch mit aktuell-christlichem Auswurf der CSU.

In [a new] study, children growing up in households that weren’t religious were significantly more likely to share than were children growing up in religious homes. The findings support the notion that the secularization of moral discourse may serve to increase rather than decrease human kindness, the researchers say. „Some past research had demonstrated that religious people aren’t more likely to do good than their nonreligious counterparts,“ said Jean Decety of the University of Chicago. „Our study goes beyond that by showing that religious people are less generous, and not only adults but children too.“ […]

Importantly, the researchers report, children who were the most altruistic came from atheist or non-religious families. […] The results might be explained in part by „moral licensing,“ a phenomenon in which doing something „good“—in this case practicing a religion—can leave people less concerned about the consequences of immoral behavior, the researchers say.

Phys.org: Does religion make kids less generous?
Paper: The Negative Association between Religiousness and Children’s Altruism across the World

06 Nov 15:00

New Portraits Drawn on Maps and Star Charts by Ed Fairburn

by Christopher Jobson

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English artist Ed Fairburn (previously) uses vintage road maps and star charts as canvases for drawn portraits. Cross-hatched patterns and shaded regions inside roads, borders, and rivers assimilate into the contours of faces, as if the images had always been secretly hidden in the map’s topography. “In his hands, both built infrastructure and natural phenomena echo the organic human form,” shares Mike Wright Gallery. “National highway systems become capillaries, and the tangle of Paris’ alleyways become the wrinkles that give the face history and individuality.”

Fairburn opens a new show of work alongside artist John Wentz today at Mike Wright in Denver.

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07 Nov 17:01

Photo



02 Nov 22:22

Alexander Semenov Continues to Photograph the Earth’s Most Fragile Marine Wildlife Near the Arctic Circle

by Christopher Jobson

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Eutonina indicans / © Alexander Semenov

For the last several years, marine photographer Alexander Semenov (previously) has lead the divers team at Moscow State University’s White Sea Biological Station located just south of the Artic Circle. Semenov directs scientific dives in extremely cold and harsh conditions to document sea creatures seldom seen anywhere else on Earth. From giant jellyfish to the tiniest of unknown sea worms, the photographer captures almost all of the creatures you see here out in the wild, without the convenience of a laboratory or studio.

It’s estimated that nearly 80% of all aquatic life in the world’s oceans has yet to be studied or even discovered. In response to this potentially vast world of unknown lifeforms, coupled with Semenov’s unceasing interest in marine biology, an ambitious trek across the world’s oceans has been planned for 2016. The Aquatilis Expedition is a proposed journey that will take a team of divers, scientists, and videographers to locations around the globe for the purposes of identifying new species, an odyssey on par with the advertures of Jacques Cousteau.

Many of Semenov’s best photos are available as prints, and he shares regular updates on both Facebook and Flickr.

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Cyanea rainbow / © Alexander Semenov

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Syllidae from the Sea of Okhotsk / © Alexander Semenov

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Cestum veneris, Italy / © Alexander Semenov

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Beroe cucumis / © Alexander Semenov

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Cyanea nude / © Alexander Semenov

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Clione limacina / © Alexander Semenov

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Sarsia tubulosa attacked by Cyanea capillata / © Alexander Semenov

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Swimming file clam, Australia / © Alexander Semenov

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Aglantha digitale / © Alexander Semenov

26 Oct 14:00

Portraits of Auto Mechanics in the Style of Renaissance Paintings by Freddy Fabris

by Christopher Jobson

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Chicago-based photographer Freddy Fabris has worked for years on commercial projets for clients like Leo Burnett, Saatchi & Saatchi, and Ogilvy & Mather, but it was a recent decision to focus on a personal project exploded into a bevy of awards and accolades. Fabris, who has a background in painting, had long been ruminating about how to pay tribute to the works of classic painters like Rembrandt and Da Vinci using his camera. While accompanying a friend to a cluttered auto repair shop, inspiration suddenly struck. Fabris would pose the mechanics in the style of classical portraits, and in tableaus reminiscent of Philippe de Champaigne’s The Last Supper and Michelangelo’s The Creation of Adam. As he shared the idea with colleagues and collaborators, everyone quickly jumped on board and the Renaissance series was born.

While the photos are admittedly absurd, the staggering amount of craft and skill present in each shot is undeniable. From the careful composition of bodies to the striking use of light to illuminate the face of each subject, the portraits in particular are strangely dignifying. The photos have since won the 1st Place International Color Award, the One Eyeland Silver Award, and an APA Conceptual Award. You can explore more of Fabris’ work on his website.

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17 Oct 15:28

carebearpikachu: THIS IS SO CALMING AND FUN





















carebearpikachu:

THIS IS SO CALMING AND FUN

28 Oct 12:47

Viva Intensamente # 231

by Will Tirando

cão cachorro espaço foguete marte urina marcar território nasa robô

21 Oct 15:42

iguanamouth: catch, and release









iguanamouth:

catch, and release

26 Sep 06:40

Saturday, September 26 @ 6:07:09 am

by VectorJones
22 Oct 07:46

Particles swirling in the atmosphere

by Nathan Yau
x

Gavin Schmidt shows different types of particles that swirl around in our atmosphere:

"Different kinds of particles are a different color," explains climate scientist, Gavin Schmidt. "The easiest to see are the reddy-orange particles; those are dust and you can see them streaming them off the Sahara," Also worth noting: white particles (pollution from burning coal and volcanoes); red dots (fires over a particular period); and blue color (seasalt being whipped up into air by the wind).

Nice.

Tags: atmosphere, environment

26 Oct 00:00

Evan Esar

"Statistics: The only science that enables different experts using the same figures to draw different conclusions."
15 Oct 00:00

Maurice Maeterlinck

"We are alone, absolutely alone on this chance planet: and, amid all the forms of life that surround us, not one, excepting the dog, has made an alliance with us."
22 Oct 00:00

Mitch Hedberg

"You know, you can't please all the people all the time... and last night, all those people were at my show."
22 Oct 20:03

Handmade Blown Glass Flora and Fauna by ‘Glass Symphony’

by Christopher Jobson

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Ukrainian glass artist Nikita Drachuk of Glass Symphony creates all manner of glass spiders, octopi, and other critters by hand. He uses a method called lampworking, where a lamp or torch is used to melt rods of colored glass. Once in a molten state, the glass can be formed by blowing and shaping with various tools and small movements. You can see more of their delicate glass critters here.

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15 Oct 17:21

Winners of the 2015 Wildlife Photographer of the Year

by Christopher Jobson

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Still life, Edwin Giesbers, The Netherlands. Amphibians and Reptiles, WINNER.

The winners of the 2015 Wildlife Photographer of the Year have just been announced, and the top images depict an extreme gamut of beauty and ferocity found in the natural world. The grand title winner was ‘A Tale of Two Foxes' taken by photographer Don Gutoski in Wapusk National Park in Manitoba, Canada that captures an unusual deadly clash between between red and Arctic foxes. The two species aren’t known to prey on each other as they generally hunt and live in different climates, but as their habitats have gradually merged over the last few years, the two animals are now on an unexpected collision course.

Kathy Moran, senior editor for natural history projects at National Geographic and jury member, referred to the photo as “one of the strongest single storytelling photographs I have ever seen.” She continued, “the immediate impact of this photograph is that it appears as if the red fox is slipping out of its winter coat. What might simply be a straightforward interaction between predator and prey struck the jury as a stark example of climate change, with red foxes encroaching on Arctic fox territory.”

The winning photos seen here were selected from 42,000 entries from 96 countries, and will be exhibited at the Natural History Museum in London from October 16th, 2015, through April 10th, 2016. You can read the story behind each winning image in this gallery. (via PetaPixel)

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A whale of a mouthful, Michael AW, Australia. Underwater, WINNER.

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A tale of two foxes, Don Gutoski, Canada. Wildlife Photographer of the Year, WINNER.

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The company of three, Amir Ben-Dov, Israel. Birds, WINNER.

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Flight of the scarlet ibis, Jonathan Jagot, France. Young Wildlife Photographers:
 15–17 years old, WINNER.

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Life comes to art, Juan Tapia, Spain. Impressions, WINNER. Story.

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Ruffs on display, Ondrej Pelánek, Czech Republic. Young Wildlife Photographer of the Year, 11–14 years old, WINNER.

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The art of algae, Peter Soler, Spain. From the Sky, WINNER.

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Shadow walker, Richard Peters, UK. Urban, WINNER.

23 Oct 03:13

blazepress: 40 Amazing Perfectly Looped Ambient GIFs

22 Oct 12:57

...o garçom tira o prato mas ainda tem comida.

(by Marko Mello)
19 Oct 13:05

É A CRISE

by Regiane Virginelli

Enquanto isso, no bat-ponto:

E-A-CRISE

O post É A CRISE apareceu primeiro em Kibe Loco.

09 Oct 17:46

Wire Animal Sculptures that Look Like Scribbled Pencil Drawings by David Oliveira

by Christopher Jobson

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Artist David Oliveira (previously) works with wire in an unconventional way by cutting and twisting the material into sculptures that could be mistaken for 2D sketches. Despite the apparent difficulty of shaping wire into a recognizable form, Oliveira manages to achieve uncanny proportions of his animal subjects in this series of sculptures from 2014. Viewed from one angle the pieces could be mistaken for a chaotic jumble, but a shift in perspective reveals the squinting eyes of lions, or the spread wings of a pelican. The Lisbon-based artist also creates vast interior installations of birds and thoughtful examinations of the human form. You can scroll through an archive of his work over on Facebook. (via Cross Connect)

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09 Oct 16:04

Infográfico: O que está em jogo no TSE

by Maurício Moraes

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03 Oct 22:40

by It’s the Tie

01 Oct 22:01

Photos of the Ancient Temples of Angkor, Cambodia

by Michael Zhang

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Photographer Alex Teuscher recently traveled to Cambodia for work, and while there, he took the opportunity to visit and photograph the ancient temples found in the Angkor region of the country.

Angkor once served as the capital city of the Khmer Empire between the 9th and 15th centuries. Its name means “Holy City,” and at its peak, it was a megacity that had 0.1% of the worlds population. These days, that would be the equivalent of a city with over 7 million people.

There are over 1,000 temples in the Angkor area, from small ruins to some of the largest temple structures in the world. These days, over 2 million people visit the ruins each year, and the area has been designated a World Heritage Site by UNESCO.

Here’s a selection of Teuscher’s photos:

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The sun rises over the 5 towers of Angkor Wat, the largest religious monument in the world.

The sun rises over the 5 towers of Angkor Wat, the largest religious monument in the world.

Endless corridors of Preah Khan, one of the largest complexes of Angkor

Endless corridors of Preah Khan, one of the largest complexes of Angkor

The well known Ta Prohm temple, made famous in the Tomb raider film.

The well known Ta Prohm temple, made famous in the Tomb raider film.

Incredible bas reliefs in the interior of Prasat Kravan temple

Incredible bas reliefs in the interior of Prasat Kravan temple

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 Ta Prohm temple.

Ta Prohm temple.

One of the four pools of the gallery of a thousand buddhas, located within the temple grounds. The buddhas no longer remain, as most were removed and others stolen. Few traces remain.

One of the four pools of the gallery of a thousand buddhas, located within the temple grounds. The buddhas no longer remain, as most were removed and others stolen. Few traces remain.

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Incredible bas reliefs and wall carvings. near every surface in the temples was decorated.

Incredible bas reliefs and wall carvings. near every surface in the temples was decorated.

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The amazing carvings of Banteay Srei, the citadel of woman. Considered the most beautiful of all the temples and the carvings some of the most intricate to be found anywhere in the world.

The amazing carvings of Banteay Srei, the citadel of woman. Considered the most beautiful of all the temples and the carvings some of the most intricate to be found anywhere in the world.

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A pair of the over 3000 Apsaras (heavenly dancing girls from Hindu mythology) seen at the end of a long corridor.

A pair of the over 3000 Apsaras (heavenly dancing girls from Hindu mythology) seen at the end of a long corridor.

Bayon temple is known for its many  smiling faces.

Bayon temple is known for its many smiling faces.

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You can find more of Teuscher’s photos from his Cambodia trip on Facebook here and here.

Last year, we also featured another set of Teuscher’s photos, a series of moody photos of New York City.


Image credits: Photographs by Alex Teuscher and used with permission