Shared posts

23 Aug 15:13

Kindecepção

by Will Tirando

KINDEROVO-DESCASO

12 Aug 16:12

Other Queen

by Reza

other-queen

09 Aug 15:19

shitifindon: @shedoesnotcomprehend

04 Aug 15:36

Anésia # 294

by Will Tirando

ANÉSIA-DOLORES-POKEMON-GO

03 Aug 10:54

Mentirinhas #1020

by Fábio Coala

mentirinhas_1012:(

O post Mentirinhas #1020 apareceu primeiro em Mentirinhas.

16 Jul 14:00

Tilt Shift Van Gogh’s Paintings

by Léa

Les tableaux de Vincent Van Gogh traversent les époques et émerveillent toujours autant. Les utilisateurs de Reddit se regroupant sous le nom de melonshade, ont transféré les toiles sur photoshop et les ont retravaillées en y ajoutant du flou pour renforcer certains détails ou encore donner l’impression qu’elles avait été saisies avec un objectif disposant de l’effet « tilt shift ».

vangoghtiltshift8 vangoghtiltshift7 vangoghtiltshift6 vangoghtiltshift5 vangoghtiltshift4 vangoghtiltshift3 vangoghtiltshift2 vangoghtiltshift1
12 Jul 13:14

The Troubled Typeface

by Grant


This comic appears in the Summer/Fall 2016 issue of The Southampton Review.

Poster Shop |  Patreon
11 Jul 13:59

Yet?

by Lunarbaboon

Kickstarter Reward! - check out www.rubbateets.com

07 Jul 20:21

Video: Simone Giertz Makes a “Deal With It” Robot

21 Jul 19:30

Passport Map Shows You All the Countries You Can Visit With or Without a Visa

by Alan Henry
Passport Map Shows You All the Countries You Can Visit With or Without a Visa

Depending on the passport you hold, it can be a breeze to visit another country, or it can be a maddening process that takes months of paperwork, clearance, visits to consulates or embassies, and the risk of getting denied anyway. Passport Map can help you figure out what you’re in for before you plan a trip.

http://lifehacker.com/the-travel-doc…

Passport Map is a fun enough site in its own right, since you can explore the passports of various countries on the main page, but its real value is in the visa comparison table, where you can select the country you hold a passport with, and see what the entry and visa process is like for virtually every other country on the planet. You can even add multiple passports to the comparison list, so you can see how, for example, your Canadian friend would fare if you traveled together, or just what it might be like to be a tourist from another country.

If you prefer, click the “compare by destination” tab to see what specific countries put visitors from other nations through if they want to visit. Sadly the site doesn’t help you jump off to visa information for those countries, or even to the embassies for the countries that require them, but it’s a good starting point for your research if, for example, you’re an American looking to visit China, or a Canadian who’d like to visit Ghana, in which both cases a visa is required.

Passport Index

18 Jul 20:00

This Infographic Crams In Over 30 Essential Google Search Tips

by Thorin Klosowski

Google’s search engine is an always-expanding, extremely useful tool that’s packed with tons of different tools. Over on Zapier, they outline tons of different advanced tricks for searching Google as quickly as possible.

http://lifehacker.com/google-tips-an…

Lifehacker alum Melanie Pinola digs into tons of Google search tips here, including some that are easy to forget, like the mortgage calculator, instant customer service phone numbers (search for the company named followed by “customer service”), and time zone conversions. Head over to the full post on Zapier for tons of detailed info, or check out the infographic below.

Search Smarter: 30+ Google Search Tricks You Might Not Already Know | Zapier

Thanks Melanie for sending this in!

This Infographic Crams In Over 30 Essential Google Search Tips
29 Jul 00:00

Sam Levenson

"You must learn from the mistakes of others. You can't possibly live long enough to make them all yourself."
23 Jun 17:00

Can You Eat Too Much Protein?

by Beth Skwarecki on Vitals, shared by Andy Orin to Lifehacker
Can You Eat Too Much Protein?

Depending on who you ask, we’re either eating “too much” protein, or we need protein shake after protein shake just to build a little muscle or lose weight. The truth isn’t either of these. Some of us may need more, while others get more than enough—but more isn’t necessarily harmful. Here’s how to figure it all out.

More Than Enough Isn’t “Too Much”

Last time we talked about protein, we were trying to figure out how much was enough. To recap, the Health and Medicine Division of the National Academies says that 98 percent of us will get enough protein if we eat 0.36 grams of protein per pound of body weight. That number, the RDA, is the basis of textbook and government guidelines. It works out to 54 grams for the average woman, who is about 150 pounds, or 72 grams for the average man at about 200 pounds.

http://vitals.lifehacker.com/how-much-prote...

Most Americans eat more than that. In this report from the US Department of Agriculture, based on a large survey from 2010, men ate 98 grams of protein per day, on average and women ate 68. Protein intake was low in some older adults and some teenage girls, but most of us easily meet the textbook requirements.

Studies like that one have led to a sort-of myth that we are all eating “too much” protein. But that’s misleading. It’s more correct to say that on average we are eating more than enough protein. That’s a good thing! After all, we wouldn’t want to eat less than enough.

So that number we started with—0.36 grams of protein per pound of bodyweight, sometimes written as 0.8 grams per kilogram—is a minimum. And it’s only the minimum for people living an averagely sedentary life. If you exercise a lot, or if you’re trying to lose weight, it makes sense to eat more than that.

Even if a marathon runner or a bodybuilder would be healthy with a protein intake near the textbook amount, they may be even healthier, or able to do better in their sport, with a higher intake. Again, that’s not too much; it’s within the range that their body can put to good use. This range goes up to 0.82 g/lb, depending on the athlete and their sport. That’s 123 grams for a 150-pound person, or 164 grams for a 200-pound person.

Extra Protein Just Means Extra Calories

You’ll notice that even the higher levels we discussed are well under the 1 gram per pound “rule” that bodybuilders and some other athletes like to repeat. You don’t have to look far to find people who are trying to eat 200 or even 300 grams of protein in a day, on the theory that more is better. The extra protein won’t hurt you, but it could make you gain weight.

Here’s what’s going on in your body. We eat protein so that we have amino acids (protein’s building blocks) to build our own protein-containing body parts. That includes muscle as well as hair, skin, enzymes, and all kinds of little components of our cells. But we only need so much. Eating an extra 100 grams of protein won’t make your body decide to build 100 more grams of muscle and hair. Instead, that extra protein is just...food.

Just like we can burn fat or carbohydrates as fuel, we can burn protein. And just like we can convert those nutrients to fat for storage, we can do that with protein too. To burn or store protein’s calories, our body has to remove the nitrogen-containing “amino” part from each amino acid, and the most convenient way to excrete that nitrogen is in urine. That’s given rise to a bizarre myth that it’s impossible to eat too much protein because your body will “pee out the excess.” No, the calories from the protein are still being stored or burned like any other calories. Your pee just contains an indicator of the fact that you ate some of your calories in the form of protein.

That’s disappointing if you’re trying to lose weight: you could have had those same calories in a different form that maybe you liked better. Perhaps a grilled cheese or a small dessert instead of an umpteenth dry chicken breast.

The “Dangers” of High Protein Diets Are Overblown

The same government document that lays out the recommendations for protein also contains a note about the “adverse effects of excessive consumption.” There is no level of protein, it says, that is associated with adverse effects. Instead, they recommend that protein make up between 10 and 35 percent of adults’ calories. They chose the lower number to provide enough protein to meet the RDA, and the upper number is, basically, as much protein as you can eat while still getting the recommended fat and carbohydrate.

So if the National Academies don’t think high protein intakes are dangerous, who does? Mainly people who aren’t up on the science, and groups like the pro-vegetarian Physicians’ Committee for Responsible Medicine. They list kidney disease, cancer, and kidney stones as downsides of a high protein diet.

But we need to remember that protein is not the same thing as meat. High intake of red and processed meat is linked with cancer, but that’s no reason to avoid other protein sources like chicken, tofu, beans, or whey powder. The connection with kidney stones is iffy, too: animal protein seems to be linked with stones, but the American College of Physicians couldn’t find enough evidence to recommend low protein diets for people prone to stones.

And the idea that too much protein will “place a strain on your kidneys,” as the PCRM says, has also been debunked. As Chris Kresser points out, people who have donated a kidney aren’t at risk for kidney disease, even though their remaining kidney is working twice as hard. That makes the “strain” idea a tough sell. Low protein diets do help people who already have kidney disease, but there isn’t any evidence that high protein is harmful for people who have healthy kidneys to start with.

Find Your Sweet Spot

Since there’s no strict limit on protein for healthy people, you need to find out what is the right amount of protein for you. Use your activity level and goals (along with our guide) to figure out what your minimum should be. That’s your “enough.” Track what you eat to make sure you’re getting an amount close to that. Tracking is especially helpful if you’re on a restrictive diet, whether paleo or vegan or just very low calorie, since you might not realize what you’re missing.

http://vitals.lifehacker.com/transform-your...

Then, to find your personal “too much,” look at your calories. Does 300 grams of protein (that’s 1200 calories) really fit into your diet? If you truly love the taste of tuna and protein shakes, it’s not our business if you pig out. But if a high protein diet is more trouble and more calories than it’s worth, that’s when it becomes too much.

Illustration by Sam Woolley.

08 Jul 00:00

John Kenneth Galbraith

"It is a far, far better thing to have a firm anchor in nonsense than to put out on the troubled sea of thought."
04 Jul 18:13

Have it All

by Reza

have-it-all

02 Jul 00:00

Dave Barry

"You can only be young once. But you can always be immature."
30 Jun 20:30

Click HERE for more Cluster Fudge



Click HERE for more Cluster Fudge

27 Jun 12:13

Recent events.image / twitter / facebook / patreon













Recent events.

image / twitter / facebook / patreon

27 Jun 00:00

Oscar Wilde

"One is tempted to define man as a rational animal who always loses his temper when he is called upon to act in accordance with the dictates of reason."
20 Jun 20:30

More Clu Fu HERE



More Clu Fu HERE

25 Apr 21:00

Level Up Your Plank Workout: 11 Planks to Build Core Strength

by Jason Fitzgerald
Level Up Your Plank Workout: 11 Planks to Build Core Strength

When you were a kid, you probably did sit-ups at school for an ab workout. But is the sit-up the best ab exercise? That’s actually a simple question. No way! There are far better ab exercises than a simple sit-up, which can exacerbate back problems and only focuses on one small area of the abdominals.

This post originally appeared on Strength Running.

And while you’ll develop tremendous ab strength by doing heavy squats, dead lifts, and other traditional weightlifting exercises, not all of us can throw around heavy iron at the gym. Luckily for us, there are a variety of plank exercises that helps us build the core strength necessary for more efficient running form and fewer overuse injuries.

The plank is a versatile exercise as it strengthens a number of muscles:

  • Rectus Abdominus (these are what you see if you have six-pack abs)
  • Internal and external obliques (the part of your abs on the side of your torso)
  • Transverse Abdominus (the deepest part of your abs that support your spine)
  • Hips (always important for runners)
  • Back (particularly important for runners, especially the lower back)
  • Glutes (strength is good – a shapely booty is a nice bonus!)

If you regularly do a plank workout, you know how simple they are. They can be done virtually anywhere and require no equipment. They’re perfect for beginners–and even the fastest of runners.

No matter what race you’re training for or your ability level, planks are a fantastic ab exercise to incorporate into your core strengthening program. I do them regularly as part of the Standard Core Routine. And they’re included in many other strength and core routines that are critical to injury prevention.

But the standard plank only gets you so far. After about 1-2 months, your fitness gains will plateau and you’ll stop getting as much strength from this exercise. What you must do is progress to more difficult variations of the exercise to continue getting stronger.

So I’m excited to share a new video (and free PDF download) showing you 11 types of planks!

The Gauntlet Plank Workout

For days when you’re short on time, Gauntlet is a good option: with 11 time-based exercises, you can do each one for just 30 seconds and still get in a solid core workout.

Here’s the full Gauntlet Plank Workout:

Here’s a description of each type of plank exercise:

1. Pushup Plank

In a prone position, prop your weight on your hands and toes. Keep a straight line from your head to your feet and brace your abs to maintain a neutral position.

2. Side Arm Raise (in Pushup position)

In the Pushup Plank position, raise your left arm to the side of your body so it is parallel to the ground and perpendicular to your torso. Hold for two seconds and return to the starting position. Repeat on the opposite side.

3. Front Arm Raise (in Pushup position)

In the pushup plank position, raise your left arm so it’s parallel to the ground. Hold for two seconds and return to the starting position. Repeat on the right side. Maintain a neutral spine position for the duration of the exercise.

4. Forearm Plank

In a prone position, prop your weight on your forearms and toes. Keep a straight line from your head to your feet and brace your abs to maintain a neutral position.

5. Pushup Plank Shuffle

In the pushup plank position, take two steps to the left and then two steps to the right. Alternate with your left arm and right leg and then your right arm and left leg.

6. Forearm to Pushup Plank

Begin in the pushup plank position and carefully lower yourself to the forearm plank position. Alternate positions for the duration of the exercise.

7. Spiderman Plank

In the pushup plank position, bring your left knee to your left elbow and hold it for about two seconds. Return to the starting position and repeat with your right leg.

8. Alternating Leg Lifts (Pushup)

In the pushup plank position, raise your left leg about 12-18” off the ground. Hold for two seconds and return to the starting position. Repeat on the opposite side. Ensure good form by maintaining a braced, neutral spine position and activating the glutes to help lift your leg.

9. Two-Point Pushup Plank

In the pushup plank position, raise your left leg off the ground while lifting your right arm at the same time. Your left leg should be about 12-18” off the ground and your right arm should be parallel to the ground. Hold for about 2 seconds and then return to the starting position. Repeat with the opposite leg and arm.

10. Alternating Leg Lifts (Forearm)

In the forearm plank position, raise your left leg about 12-18” off the ground. Hold for two seconds and return to the starting position. Repeat on the opposite side. Ensure good form by maintaining a braced, neutral spine position and activating the glutes to help lift your leg.

11. Two-Point Forearm Plank

In the forearm plank position, raise your left leg off the ground while lifting your right arm at the same time. Your left leg should be about 12-18” off the ground and your right arm should be parallel to the ground. Hold for about 2 seconds and then return to the starting position. Repeat with the opposite leg and arm.

All About Plank Workouts

This type of core workout is incredibly versatile. But with that flexibility there’s bound to be questions, so let’s dive in!

How Long Should I do Each Plank?

As long as you want! The beauty of this plank workout is that each exercise can be done for a short period of time for an easier strength session–or longer to increase its difficulty.

My recommendation is to hold each exercise for about 30 seconds to 1 minute.

How Many Sets of This Plank Workout Should I Do?

Start with one but you can increase that to two or even three sets if you’re ambitious. There’s virtually no injury risk with planks so don’t worry about getting hurt.

What If I Can’t Do One of the Planks?

No problem! The beauty of this plank workout is that it can be used by beginners or advanced athletes. Just skip the plank you can’t do or do an easier version.

For example, if you can’t do a two-point forearm plank, then try a two-point pushup plank. Still too hard? Try an alternating leg lifts plank in the forearm position. STILL too hard? Then do an alternating leg lifts plank in the pushup position.

By reducing the complexity of the exercise and moving from the forearm to pushup position, you can decrease the plank’s difficulty.

Is the Order of the Exercises Important?

The order of the planks in the Gauntlet Workout are roughly ordered from easiest to most difficult (though many of the planks are of a similar difficulty level). So by doing them in the order that they’re presented, you accomplish two goals:

  1. You help yourself gradually warm up into the workout
  2. You essentially “negative split” the workout by doing the most difficult exercises last

You don’t need to do this plank workout in this exact order but I do recommend it.

When Should I Do the Gauntlet Plank Workout?

This core routine is best done after your run about once or twice per week. It can also be done throughout your entire training cycle.

Be sure to alternate with other strength workouts like the ITB Rehab Routine or Tomahawk Medicine Ball Workout.

Why Is It Called the “Gauntlet” Workout?

All of the core and strength routines in Injury Prevention for Runners are named after medieval weapons (for the sole reason that they’re interesting names!). This tradition is continued with the Gauntlet Plank Workout.

If you’d like more information on Injury Prevention for Runners (Strength Running’s most popular training program), just sign up to my free course here. You can also get a handy PDF photo guide. You can refer to it whenever you’d like, hang it in your gym, or make the most stylish paper airplanes. It’s more convenient–and will hopefully encourage you to do more strength work!

Level Up Your Plank Workout: 11 New Planks That Build Core Strength | Strength Running


Jason Fitzgerald is a 2:39 marathoner and USATF-certified running coach at Strength Running. Get his latest coaching advice and free injury prevention course here. Image by Danijela Radakkovic (Shutterstock).

13 May 00:41

Neat Art Piece Hides Two Different Wire Sculptures Depending on Your Perspective

by Casey Chan on Sploid, shared by Cheryl Eddy to io9
Neat Art Piece Hides Two Different Wire Sculptures Depending on Your Perspective

Here’s a fun art piece made by artist Matthieu Robert-Ortis: in one perspective, it looks like two giraffes standing opposite each other while in another, it looks like a single elephant staring straight at you. The piece plays on your perspective and hides two wire sculptures in one, what you see depends on which angle you’re looking at it.

Read more...

13 May 12:00

An Inspiring Photographical Journey Through China

by Hoel

Après avoir découvert les paysages et les cultures de 21 pays différents en quelques mois, le photographe canadien Luke Gram a franchi la frontière chinoise depuis Hong Kong, avant d’user ses semelles sur les routes de l’Empire du Milieu. Vues à couper le souffle, mélange de tradition et de modernité, le photographe a été estomaqué et en a ramené de nombreux clichés plus sublimes les uns que les autres.

An Inspiring Photographical Journey Through China26 An Inspiring Photographical Journey Through China25 An Inspiring Photographical Journey Through China24 An Inspiring Photographical Journey Through China23 An Inspiring Photographical Journey Through China22 An Inspiring Photographical Journey Through China21 An Inspiring Photographical Journey Through China20 An Inspiring Photographical Journey Through China19 An Inspiring Photographical Journey Through China18 An Inspiring Photographical Journey Through China17 An Inspiring Photographical Journey Through China16 An Inspiring Photographical Journey Through China15 An Inspiring Photographical Journey Through China14 An Inspiring Photographical Journey Through China13 An Inspiring Photographical Journey Through China12 An Inspiring Photographical Journey Through China11 An Inspiring Photographical Journey Through China10 An Inspiring Photographical Journey Through China9 An Inspiring Photographical Journey Through China8 An Inspiring Photographical Journey Through China7 An Inspiring Photographical Journey Through China6 An Inspiring Photographical Journey Through China5 An Inspiring Photographical Journey Through China4 An Inspiring Photographical Journey Through China3 An Inspiring Photographical Journey Through China2 An Inspiring Photographical Journey Through China1
27 Mar 14:39

Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal - Happiness

by admin@smbc-comics.com

Hovertext: Oddly enough, I'm pretty sure this would work.


New comic!
Today's News:
27 Mar 00:00

David Friedman

"The direct use of force is such a poor solution to any problem, it is generally employed only by small children and large nations."
08 Mar 17:16

(via meow99)



(via meow99)

12 Mar 14:00

Dude Let Me In, I'm the Savior

god,historical memes

Submitted by: Unknown

Tagged: god , historical memes
14 Mar 14:52

Anésia # 268

by Will Tirando

Anésia jornal corrupção Will política políticos escondidos indignação corruptos

23 Mar 00:00

Jeff Valdez

"Cats are smarter than dogs. You can't get eight cats to pull a sled through snow."
20 Mar 00:00

Evan Esar

"Hope is tomorrow's veneer over today's disappointment."