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24 Mar 22:44

Berkeley email spam mishap spawns community spirit

About 70 people attended a picnic to celebrate an email list mishap last week that brought thousands of strangers together. Photo: Drew Wheeler

About 70 people attended a picnic to celebrate an email list mishap last week that brought thousands of strangers together. Photo: Drew Wheeler

Thousands of Berkeley voters got stuck in an email storm last week after a technical glitch became a viral meme that prompted around 70 residents to hold a potluck picnic Sunday.

It all started late last Tuesday when Nigel Guest, president of a Berkeley community group called the Council of Neighborhood Associations, attempted to send an email to himself that mistakenly hit the inboxes of thousands of registered voters.

The brief email, with the subject line “test,” included a single character: “x.” Instead of ignoring the message, some of the recipients responded to ask why they gotten it. And, rather than replying only to Guest, they made the fateful, likely unintentional, decision to reply all. 

Email recipient Christopher Berry created a "highlights reel" from what's been termed Berkeley's "spampocalypse."

Recipient Christopher Berry created a “highlights reel” from what’s been termed Berkeley’s “spampocalypse.”

Those replies, which also reached thousands, stirred up a range of sentiments and, from one recipient, threats of legal action. In the days that followed, hundreds of emails volleyed among those on the list. Amid a spate of initial questions from many about why they had received the message, one person wrote: “Oohhh a mystery, we have to figure out what we all have in common.”

Several pleaded with the group to stop replying all, and another list member cautioned: “You can’t close Pandora’s box once it is open.” Dozens of emails continued to be sent to the whole list, and there was no clear way to get out of the loop. According to Berkeley resident Christopher Berry, who created a “highlights reel” of the exchange and posted it online, approximately 100 emails went out over the first four hours.

One frustrated recipient wrote to Guest to complain, but her email hit the entire list: “You recently sent a test email that has resulted in an incredibly unprofessional email chain that is disrupting my studies with emails every two minutes. Please find a way to disable this email chain, or prevent this from happening in the future.”

Her note, however, only prompted a new wave of responses: “For God’s sake I’m an old man and want to be left alone. I live in Mexico,” said one. Replied another: “Let’s communicate like it’s 1999!”

About half an hour into the exchange, several members of the list began creating graphic memes to capture the experience.

Berkeley "spampocalypse" memes.

Berkeley “spampocalypse” memes.

While some became irate at the intrusion, many others were highly amused by the hijinks, and sought to find ways to prolong what became known as the Berkeley “spampocalypse.” About an hour after the initial email, one person on the list suggested holding a potluck meet-up. Minutes later, a Facebook “support group” was created for people on the list who wanted to keep the hilarity going.

There was no word from Guest that first night, and one email recipient wrote: “I actually feel a little sorry for Nigel. This is not going to be pleasant to wake up to. Alternately, it’s a very good [psychological] test.”

Wednesday morning, Guest sent an email titled “Sincere apologies,” to explain that he had been setting up CNA’s email system when he inadvertently linked the organization’s main email account to a large list of people. He asked that the “reply alls” cease, and said he was working to correct the problem.

Guest's apology.

Guest’s apology.

The emails, however, did not stop. Just after 11 a.m., one list recipient said he was very concerned about the messages, and shared his theory with the group about how his address might have been compromised. He said he believed Guest had stolen his email address, using “house equipment,” when he drove by Guest’s home, near the UC Berkeley Botanical Garden, on a recent outing. He wondered if Guest was “leeching on to devices that are somehow exposed.”

One recipient had his own theory about how his email address had been compromised. Image: Christopher Berry

One recipient had his own theory about how his email address was compromised. See more from the “highlights reel.”

One woman in particular was not amused as the emails continued to roll in. About an hour after the leeching email, she sent a sternly worded message to the list to threaten legal action.

One woman threatened legal action after her email address was included in Guest's test email.

One woman threatened legal action after her email address was included in Guest’s test email. See more from the “highlights reel.”

There were also reports of angry phone calls, from several unhappy list members, to Guest as well as others who “replied all” and included their contact info in their email signatures.

A woman on the Facebook “survivor” group shared the following: “I just received a phone call from an extremely irate individual threatening to call the FBI on me to report the email spam. Has anyone every tried calling the FBI? It’s got to be harder than getting through to the post office.” She added: “I’m afraid to walk away from my computer ’cause someone might say something funny while I’m gone.”

Wrote Berry, in his Spampocalype highlights round-up, “Many of us found the outrage and frivolous appeals over something so benign and beautiful to be amusing.” That afternoon, the list activity hit a new peak. Wrote Berry: “In what may be the greatest act of trolling of all time, one email recipient sent an email to the listerv with fake instructions on how to unsubscribe.”

Those instructions told list recipients to write to CNA’s main email list with the words “Subscription terminate.” But, either due to continuing problems with CNA’s email system, or because the instructions were meant in jest, those emails, too, continued to reach the entire list of thousands.

"Subscription terminate" does not work as planned.

The “Subscription terminate” command does not work as planned. See more from the “highlights reel.”

Word was spreading Wednesday about the list, as recipients told friends and neighbors about what had been taking place.

Wednesday afternoon, one person sent the following message to the group, with the subject line, “Please Subscribe Me?”: “There’s a lot of people that want out of this list, I know a bunch of people that want to be put on this amazing list. Is there a way that we can make that happen?” People began adding interested parties to the email list, which had a 5,000-person audience, according to one person getting the messages.

Meanwhile, over in the Facebook “support group,” those who found the episode amusing rather than maddening joked and reflected on the experience.

Said one woman: “I can’t stand it. I’m laughing so hard. People are still replying even as I type this! They just can’t stop themselves!”

One man wrote: “This has become such an important event in my life, and no one I try to explain it to can understand.”

Wrote another, on Thursday, “As of 10:47am on March 19th, I have counted 332 individual emails in my inbox relating to this whole matter. Come on people, pick up the pace! I’m only at 49% storage capacity in my gmail account. What could I possibly do with those extra 7 or 8 gigabytes?? My inbox isn’t going to fill itself up without your help, I want to see more replies. Don’t stop!”

It was also in the Facebook group that it became clear how the list recipients were connected. A woman who spoke to Guest said he had been working from a voter registration list with 16,000 names on it. He told her he had mistakenly linked about 2,000 of those names to the main email account, which he had tried to use to send a message only to himself. People with last names starting with the letters A-H were included. (One person who attended the picnic said Guest later said the email actually had gone to 5,000 people. Guest did not reply to a request from Berkeleyside for comment.)

Some on the Facebook group created T-shirt and button designs to memorialize favorite moments.

One person made buttons with the phrases "Subscription terminate" and "Re: test" (the subject line of many of the list emails). Another created a T-shirt to mark the occasion.

One person made buttons with the phrases “Subscription terminate” and “Re: test” (the subject line of many of the list emails). Another created a T-shirt to mark the occasion, reading “I replied all.”

Members came up with hashtags, such as #ChosenByNigel, and posited a variety of ideas about why they had been brought together and what they might do with the resulting energy and enthusiasm. Wrote one: “You have all been chosen. You will be contacted in the next 48 hours with more info regarding your mission. Best of luck.”

Wrote another: “All of us were chosen by Nigel for a greater purpose. I feel like we should do something. Together. For the community. I’m actually serious.” Others responded with ideas about what they might do, from creating “care packs for the homeless” to working with veterans or the unemployed. Another suggested that they might come up with training aimed at computer literacy classes for seniors. (Those ideas are still in development.)

Plans also firmed up for a Sunday “CNA Survivor Picnic” at Ohlone Park in North Berkeley. Wrote one group member: “Each of us had a moment where it dawned on us that this was more than an annoyance. It had become something crazy, random and hilarious. That is why I’m blowing off another potluck I was going to in order to attend the CNA Survivors picnic. I want to meet others who seized the humor and joy in the Spampocalypse and want to keep riding this random wave.”

Guest, pictured center with a can of Spam he received as a gift, is surrounded by dozens of "CNA survivors." Photo: Sofia Chang

Guest, pictured center in a brown shirt with a can of Spam he received as a gift, is surrounded by dozens of “CNA survivors.” Photo: Sofia Chang

About 70 people attended the Sunday picnic, and said the group wants to continue meeting on a monthly basis to solidify plans for volunteer efforts and build on the sense of community created by Guest’s mistake. Guest attended the picnic — and received a can of Spam as a thank-you gift. At one point, participants circled up to share their favorite memories from the email exchange.

Berry, who created the “highlights reel” from the email chain, said he had not been sure what to expect at the picnic.

“I thought it was going to be terrible,” he said. “Meeting up with a new group of strangers from the internet, you never really know what you’re going to get. But it was a 10 out of 10. Everyone was really friendly and really funny. We laughed and chatted, and whenever a newcomer came, the entire group welcomed them.”

Cris Benson described the group as “a good broad section of Berkeley” and said he felt it was a shared sense of humor that brought so many people together Sunday.

“It just grew organically out of proportion to what it was, and that’s what made it so great,” he said Monday. “I really did find kindred spirits at the picnic just because we are all connected by our sense of humor at this mistake that was made.”

Ben Bartlett and his wife, Yelda, said "We replied all."

Ben Bartlett and his wife, Yelda, said “We replied all.” Several members of the email storm got together last week at Eureka in Berkeley.

Berkeley native Ben Bartlett described last week’s exchange as “some sort of groundbreaking meta event: We are in the same geographic location. We are of a similar disposition, and we took this random email spam as an excuse to come together.”

“It’s really, really awesome, I’ve never experienced anything like it,” he continued. “Unlike social media, this was your email. It was like someone knocking on your door.”

Bartlett even composed a poem for the occasion, which he read during the sharing circle at the picnic: “The Message Came / It was a Test. / Who are you? / The people asked / Who are you? / Like yourself, / ‘I Replied All!'”

The “email storm” phenomenon has been documented on Wikipedia, but has not previously received such notoriety in Berkeley. The event is sometimes called a “Reply Allpocalypse,” and has made headlines in the past when it’s struck large companies such as Microsoft, or government entities such as the Department of Homeland Security and the State Department.

Bartlett hypothesized that a shared desire for community also added momentum to what transpired.

“We bonded over this,” he said. “Enough of us were into it to make it special. And I suspect that even the ones displeased by it kind of had to remark in wonder at what happened.”

Added Berry, who moved to Berkeley about three years ago and said he’s not really “involved in Berkeley things”: “It was really nice to meet people who also live in Berkeley. Now I might see them at Trader Joe’s and I’ll know that they’re my neighbor, and that they’re cool.”

Get the latest Berkeley news in your inbox with Berkeleyside’s free Daily Briefing. And make sure to bookmark Berkeleyside’s pages on Facebook and Twitter. You don’t need an account on those sites to view important information. 

Bookmarked at brandizzi Delicious' sharing tag and expanded by Delicious sharing tag expander.
16 Mar 20:52

Scientists had a pigeon, hawk, and owl fly over super-sensitive...







Scientists had a pigeon, hawk, and owl fly over super-sensitive microphones to measure how much sound was created by their flapping. Owls are known for their silent flying abilities and this is demonstrated by the barn owl in the GIF above. Watch the video

21 Mar 18:31

RT @Werthead: If George R.R. Martin wrote STAR TREK: http://t.co/AYhM0WRisC

by Osias Jota
800px-Coturnix_coturnix_eggs_normal.jpg
Author: Osias Jota
Source: Mobile Web (M2)
RT @Werthead: If George R.R. Martin wrote STAR TREK: http://t.co/AYhM0WRisC
CAoyu6WWUAA5CWS.jpg:large
24 Mar 14:24

Photo



24 Mar 12:53

RT @andreiferreira_: "Nova temporada de Game of Thrones dará spoilers dos futuros...

by Osias Jota
800px-Coturnix_coturnix_eggs_normal.jpg
Author: Osias Jota
Source: Buffer
RT @andreiferreira_: "Nova temporada de Game of Thrones dará spoilers dos futuros livros" PARECE QUE O JOGO VIROU NÃO É MESMO
22 Mar 14:28

RT @portalR7: Após declarar em rede social que sua profissão é "traficante de drogas",...

by Osias Jota
800px-Coturnix_coturnix_eggs_normal.jpg
Author: Osias Jota
Source: Buffer
RT @portalR7: Após declarar em rede social que sua profissão é "traficante de drogas", jovem é preso r7.com/ACOC http://t.co/9dL…
CAf4AhBW8AEI2uj.jpg:large
07 Aug 12:17

"The Matrix" with 8-bit sound effects

by noreply@blogger.com (biotv)
Film editor and visual effects artist Phillip Raupach edits the chateau fight scene from The Matrix: Reloaded and replaces all the original sounds with sound effects from classic video games.


Phillip Raupach | via
24 Mar 05:31

Atlas V Launches MMS

Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.

2015 March 23
See Explanation.  Clicking on the picture will download
 the highest resolution version available.

Atlas V Launches MMS
Image Credit & Copyright: Ben Cooper (Launch Photography)

Explanation: Birds don't fly this high. Airplanes don't go this fast. The Statue of Liberty weighs less. No species other than human can even comprehend what is going on, nor could any human just a millennium ago. The launch of a rocket bound for space is an event that inspires awe and challenges description. Pictured above, an Atlas V rocket lifts off carrying NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission into Earth orbit 10 days ago to study the workings of the magnetosphere that surrounds and protects the Earth. From a standing start, the 300,000 kilogram rocket ship left to circle the Earth where the outside air is too thin to breathe. Rockets bound for space are now launched from somewhere on Earth about once a week.

Tomorrow's picture: scaling the universe < | Archive | Submissions | Index | Search | Calendar | RSS | Education | About APOD | Discuss | >

Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC
& Michigan Tech. U.

Expanded from APOD by Feed Readabilitifier.
23 Mar 14:32

Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal - Awkwardness

by admin@smbc-comics.com

Hovertext: Maybe just freeze my ex's head then?


New comic!
Today's News:
One of my personal favorites from 2014!

23 Mar 04:00

4gifs:Hello, strange, small cow. [video]



4gifs:

Hello, strange, small cow. [video]

22 Mar 20:45

Let it go. (photo via mattryd7)



Let it go. (photo via mattryd7)

23 Mar 16:42

This Humidity-Powered Seed Plants Itself by Drilling into the Ground

by Christopher Jobson

seed

Now in contention for the world’s most incredible seed, I give you the seed of the Erodium plant. Powered by humidity, the seed falls to the ground and turns clockwise when wet (or counter-clockwise when dry) to effectively drill itself straight into the ground like a screw. The process here is sped up a bit, but it doesn’t appear to be edited or reversed. (via The Awesomer)

23 Mar 00:58

New Zealand used NSA data to spy on rival trade leader candidates

by Jon Fingas
Want to understand why far-reaching, poorly scrutinized spying programs are dangerous? Here's why. The Intercept and the New Zealand Herald have obtained a document showing that New Zealand used the US National Security Agency's XKeyscore surveillanc...
19 Mar 02:22

RT @arielfilipe: o texto do pdf não é selecionável http://t.co/QyBEH7bcwx

by Osias Jota
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Author: Osias Jota
Source: Buffer
RT @arielfilipe: o texto do pdf não é selecionável http://t.co/QyBEH7bcwx
CAYeYcPXIAAwpom.jpg:large
21 Feb 08:21

Jensen & Skodvin Architects dav.

by David Durand
Adam Victor Brandizzi

To the architecture branch from TOR followers


13 Mar 02:12

Photo

Adam Victor Brandizzi

ISTO ⇨⇨⇨

tumblr_n37sq0KEVq1qexjbwo1_500.jpg

04 Mar 23:34

hey



hey

21 Mar 14:30

Eres demasiado literal por @indigenica


18 Mar 04:11

Speaking a Second Language May Change How You See the World

by Soulskill
Adam Victor Brandizzi

O RLY?
¿O RLMENTE?
É MEMO?

sciencehabit writes: Where did the thief go? You might get a more accurate answer if you ask the question in German. How did she get away? Now you might want to switch to English. Speakers of the two languages put different emphasis on actions and their consequences, influencing the way they think about the world, according to a new study (abstract). The work also finds that bilinguals may get the best of both worldviews, as their thinking can be more flexible.

Share on Google+

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

20 Mar 17:02

Tattoo 2: Tattooed Too

by nedroid

Tattoo 2: Tattooed Too

20 Mar 00:00

Mysteries

Adam Victor Brandizzi

I know the world is a mysterious place and Randall could not put all of them there, but I really missed the Taman Shud Case :-/

At the bottom left: The mystery of why, when I know I needed to be asleep an hour ago, I decide it's a good time to read through every Wikipedia article in the categories 'Out-of-place artifacts', 'Earth mysteries', 'Anomalous weather', and 'List of people who disappeared mysteriously'.
21 Mar 05:00

Comic for 2015.03.21

21 Mar 07:30

Comic for March 21, 2015

21 Mar 20:40

jedavu:Frozen Lakes PatternsWith the fall of temperatures, we...


Bubbles Under The Ice of Abraham Lake by Emmanuel Coupe.


Bubbles in The Ice of Abraham Lake by Phillips Chip.


Frozen Pond by Adam Rifkin.


Ice Rider in Siberia by Matthieu Paley.


Baikal Lake in Russia by Daniel Kordan.


Lake Druzhby in Antarctica by Stu Shaw.


Blue Pond in Japan by Kent Shiraishi.


Frost Flowers in the Arctic Ocean by Matthias Wietz.


Frost Flowers in the Arctic Ocean by Matthias Wietz.


Pond in Switzerland by Dartai.

jedavu:

Frozen Lakes Patterns

With the fall of temperatures, we have gathered for you the most beautiful photographs of frozen lakes and ponds from all around the world : Russia, Switzerland, Japan or also in Canada, their frozen surfaces are full of aesthetic and graphic patterns.

22 Mar 12:30

Solar Eclipse Around The World

by dmitry
Adam Victor Brandizzi

The eclipse was awesome, but also the people, buildings and apparatuses.

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The sun is seen during a partial eclipse over a statue of the Duomo gothic cathedral in Milan, Italy, Friday, March 20, 2015. An eclipse is darkening parts of Europe on Friday in a rare solar event that won’t be repeated for more than a decade. (Photo by Luca Bruno/AP Photo)

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A solar eclipse is seen through a dark glass plate in Sarajevo, Bosnia, on Friday , March 20, 2015. Solar eclipse is darkening parts of Europe on Friday in a rare solar event that won’t be repeated for more than a decade. (Photo by Amel Emric/AP Photo)

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A partial solar eclipse is seen from near Bridgwater, in south western England, March 20, 2015. (Photo by Toby Melville/Reuters)

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A woman watches a partial solar eclipse through a dark glass plate in Budapest March 20, 2015. A solar eclipse swept across the Atlantic Ocean on Friday with the moon set to block out the sun for about 2-1/2-hour, sky gazers in Europe, Africa and Asia getting a partial celestial show. (Photo by Laszlo Balogh/Reuters)

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A partial solar eclipse is seen from near Bridgwater, in south western England, March 20, 2015. (Photo by Toby Melville/Reuters)

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A partial solar eclipse is seen through a dark glass plate in Budapest March 20, 2015. (Photo by Laszlo Balogh/Reuters)

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A partial solar eclipse forms in the sky through clouds near the cross of the Church of St Nicholas the Miracle-Maker in Sofia March 20, 2015. A partial eclipse was visible on Friday, the first day of northern spring, across parts of Africa, Europe and Asia. The total eclipse of the sun was only be visable in the Faroe Islands and the Norwegian archipelago of Svalbard in the Arctic Ocean. (Photo by Stoyan Nenov/Reuters)

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Pupils pose with their safety glasses as they try to view a partial solar eclipse through thick fog at “Halde Hoheward” in the western city of Herten March 20, 2015. A partial eclipse was visible on Friday, the first day of northern spring, across parts of Africa, Europe and Asia. The total eclipse of the sun was only be visable in the Faroe Islands and the Norwegian archipelago of Svalbard in the Arctic Ocean. (Photo by Ina Fassbender/Reuters)

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People watch a partial solar eclipse through exposed x-ray film in Marseille March 20, 2015. A partial eclipse will be visible across parts of Africa, Europe and Asia on Friday, the first day of northern spring. (Photo by Jean-Paul Pelissier/Reuters)

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A man uses binoculars with special filters as he watches a partial solar eclipse, despite the cloudy weather, at Madrid’s Planetarium March 20, 2015. A solar eclipse swept across the Atlantic Ocean on Friday with the moon set to block out the sun for a few thousand sky gazers on remote islands with millions more in Europe, Africa and Asia getting a partial celestial show. (Photo by Sergio Perez/Reuters)

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Commuters stop to stare and take photographs as they try to see a partial solar eclipse from London Bridge in London March 20, 2015. (Photo by Dylan Martinez/Reuters)

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A boy holds home-made protective glasses outside The Royal Observatory during a partial solar eclipse in Greenwich, south east London March 20, 2015. (Photo by Stefan Wermuth/Reuters)

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People wearing solar viewing glasses observe a partial solar elcipse in Reykjavik March 20, 2015. (Photo by Sigtryggur Ari/Reuters)

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A girl holds a home-made protective viewing box outside The Royal Observatory during a partial solar eclipse in Greenwich, south east London March 20, 2015. (Photo by Stefan Wermuth/Reuters)

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Irena Simic uses a self-made monocular to watch a partial solar eclipse on the bank of river Main in front of the skyline of Frankfurt, March 20, 2015. (Photo by Kai Pfaffenbach/Reuters)

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A partial solar eclipse in seen above a mosque in Oxford, central England March 20, 2015. (Photo by Eddie Keogh/Reuters)

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A partial eclipse of the sun is seen through clouds behind a roadside crucifix at Goulien, in Finistere, western France, March 20, 2015. (Photo by Mal Langsdon/Reuters)

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Bridal pair Sarah Wolf and Michael Wilde (R) and their guests look through a rescue foil as they watch a partial solar eclipse in Munich March 20, 2015. (Photo by Michaela Rehle/Reuters)

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The solar eclipse is seen over Stonehenge on Salisbury Plain, Salisbury, southern England March 20, 2015. (Photo by Kieran Doherty/Reuters)

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A person holds up a strip of exposed photographic film to observe a partial solar elcipse in Szczecin March 20, 2015. (Photo by Agencja Gazeta/Reuters)

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A girl uses a welding mask to view a partial solar eclipse from Bradgate Park in Newtown Linford, central England March 20, 2015. (Photo by Darren Staples/Reuters)

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A total solar eclipse occurs over Svalbard March 20, 2015. (Photo by Haakon Mosvold Larsen/Reuters/NTB Scanpix)

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People watch a partial solar eclipse from the grounds of Belfast Zoo, in Belfast March 20, 2015. (Photo by Cathal McNaughton/Reuters)

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A total solar eclipse is seen in Longyearbyen on Svalbard, Norway March 20, 2015. (Photo by Jon Olav Nesvold/Reuters/NTB Scanpix)

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A woman watches a partial solar eclipse in Budapest March 20, 2015. (Photo by Laszlo Balogh/Reuters)

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People look at a total solar eclipse on Svalbard March 20, 2015. (Photo by Haakon Mosvold Larsen/Reuters/NTB Scanpix)

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Children react as they wear protective glasses to watch a partial solar eclipse in a square of Pontevedra in the northwest Spain March 20, 2015. (Photo by Miguel Vidal/Reuters)

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A partial solar eclipse is seen through clouds in Sarajevo March 20, 2015. (Photo by Dado Ruvic/Reuters)

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A bird rests on a branch as a partial solar eclipse is seen, near Bridgwater, in south western England, March 20, 2015. (Photo by Toby Melville/Reuters)

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A woman uses a solar viewing filter to observe a partial solar eclipse in Vienna March 20, 2015. (Photo by Leonhard Foeger/Reuters)

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A girl looks up to try to view a partial solar eclipse outside the Planetarium of the Royal Observatory of Belgium in Brussels March 20, 2015. The total eclipse is visible in parts of the north Atlantic and Scandinavia, and with a 80-85 percent partial eclipse across Belgium. (Photo by Yves Herman/Reuters)

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A man uses a welding face mask to observe a partial solar eclipse in Viennaa March 20, 2015. (Photo by Leonhard Foeger/Reuters)

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A cross on the dome of the Cathedral of Christ the Saviour is seen during a partial solar eclipse in Moscow, March 20, 2015. A solar eclipse thrilled thousands of sky gazers on remote Arctic islands on Friday but clouds disappointed some viewers of a rare celestial show that was also partly visible for millions in Europe, Africa and Asia. (Photo by Maxim Shemetov/Reuters)

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A partial solar eclipse is seen over a statue at the Mausoleum of Hadrian, usually known as Castel Sant’Angelo, in Rome March 20, 2015. (Photo by Yara Nardi/Reuters)

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A man uses a special solar visor as he looks at a partial solar eclipse in a square of Pontevedra in the northwest Spain March 20, 2015. (Photo by Miguel Vidal/Reuters)

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A partial solar eclipse is seen over a statue at the Mausoleum of Hadrian, usually known as Castel Sant’Angelo, in Rome March 20, 2015. (Photo by Yara Nardi/Reuters)

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A partial solar eclipse is seen over St.Peter’s Basilica in Rome March 20, 2015. (Photo by Yara Nardi/Reuters)

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A man watches a partial solar eclipse looking through a floppy disc from the medieval Charles Bridge in Prague March 20, 2015. (Photo by David W. Cerny/Reuters)

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Birds fly and settle on trees in front of a partial solar eclipse, near Bridgwater, in south western England, March 20, 2015. (Photo by Toby Melville/Reuters)

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A star on the top of the tower of the Kremlin is seen during a partial solar eclipse in central Moscow, March 20, 2015. (Photo by Tatyana Makeyeva/Reuters)

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A student observes the shadow of a partial eclipse cast on to white paper, at the Astronomical Observatory in Bialystok, Poland March 20, 2015. (Photo by Agencja Gazeta/Reuters)

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A solar eclipse is viewed by ESA’s Sun-watching Proba-2 minisatellite, using it’s SWAP imager to capture the Moon passing in front of the Sun in a near-totality, in this handout image provided by the Royal Observatory of Belgium March 20, 2015. SWAP views the solar disc at extreme ultraviolet wavelengths to capture the turbulent surface of the Sun and its swirling corona. (Photo by Reuters/ESA/Royal Observatory of Belgium)

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A combination photo shows the various stages of a solar eclipse as viewed by ESA’s Sun-watching Proba-2 minisatellite, using it’s SWAP imager to capture the Moon passing in front of the Sun to a near-totality, in this handout image provided by the Royal Observatory of Belgium March 20, 2015. (Photo by Reuters/ESA/Royal Observatory of Belgium)

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A view from a plane during the so-called “Eclipse Flight” from the Russian city of Murmansk to observe the solar eclipse above the neutral waters of the Norwegian Sea, March 20, 2015. (Photo by Sergei Karpukhin/Reuters)

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The shadow of a partial eclipse is cast on to the cheek of a student on the roof of the Jana Dlugosza Academy in Czestochowa, Poland March 20, 2015. (Photo by Grzegorz Skowronek/Reuters/Agencja Gazeta)

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People take pictures onboard a plane during the so-called “Eclipse Flight” from the Russian city of Murmansk, to observe the solar eclipse above the neutral waters of the Norwegian Sea, March 20, 2015. (Photo by Sergei Karpukhin/Reuters)

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A T-shirt and other items of eclipse merchandise are displayed for sale in a store in Torshavn, the capital city of the Faeroe Islands, Thursday, March 19, 2015. For months, even years, accommodation on the remote Faeroe Islands has been booked out by fans who don’t want to miss an almost three-minute-long astronomical sensation. Now they just have to hope the clouds will blow away so they can fully experience Friday’s brief total solar eclipse. (Photo by Matt Dunham/AP Photo)

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A man uses a dental X-ray to better observe the solar eclipse in Kosovo capital Pristina on Friday, March 20, 2015. Clouds moving over the country allowed only brief views of the eclipse which in southern Europe was partial. (Photo by Visar Kryeziu/AP Photo)

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A solar eclipse is seen through a dark glass plate in Sarajevo, Bosnia, on Friday , March 20, 2015. Solar eclipse is darkening parts of Europe on Friday in a rare solar event that won’t be repeated for more than a decade. (Photo by Amel Emric/AP Photo)

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A woman stops to watch a solar eclipse outside a shopping mall in Bucharest, Romania, Friday, March 20, 2015. Clouds obscured the sun for most of the time the eclipse took place. Sign reads “Don’t look directly at the sun, danger of blindness”. (Photo by Vadim Ghirda/AP Photo)

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A dog, named Patatte, has protective glasses put on by her owner during a solar eclipse in the sky in Nice, southeastern France, Friday, March 20, 2015. An eclipse is darkening parts of Europe on Friday in a rare solar event that won’t be repeated for more than a decade. (Photo by Lionel Cironneau/AP Photo)

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A person uses a pair of binoculars to watch the moon pass infront of the Earth’s star marking a total eclipse, the only one this year, in Vigo, northwestern Spain on March 20, 2015. The Norwegian archipelago of Svalbard, located 1,300 kilometres (800 miles) from the North Pole, is along with the Faroe Islands the only place the total eclipse will be visible, assuring three minutes of total darkness when the moon totally blocks the sun. (Photo by Miguel Riopa/AFP Photo)

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A solar eclipse is seen through a dark glass plate in Sarajevo, Bosnia, on Friday, March 20, 2015. Solar eclipse is darkening parts of Europe on Friday in a rare solar event that won’t be repeated for more than a decade. (Photo by Amel Emric/AP Photo)

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A partial solar eclipse of the sun is visible in Infante D Henrique square in Porto, North of Portugal, 20 March 2015. A Partial Solar Eclipse is seen in Europe, northern and eastern Asia and northern and western Africa on 20 March 2015. (Photo by Nuno Veiga/EPA)

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People observe the solar eclipse in Milan on March 20, 2015. (Photo by Fotogramma/Splash News)


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23 Mar 05:04

A Double Eclipse of the Sun

Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.

2015 March 22
See Explanation.  Clicking on the picture will download
 the highest resolution version available.

A Double Eclipse of the Sun
Image Credit & Copyright: Thierry Legault

Explanation: Can the Sun be eclipsed twice at the same time? Last Friday was noteworthy because part of the Earth was treated to a rare total eclipse of the Sun. But also on Friday, from a part of the Earth that only saw part of the Sun eclipsed, a second object appeared simultaneously in front of the Sun: the Earth-orbiting International Space Station. Although space station eclipses are very quick -- in this case only 0.6 seconds, they are not so rare. Capturing this composite image took a lot of planning and a little luck, as the photographer had to dodge a series of third objects that kept, annoyingly, also lining up in front of the Sun: clouds. The above superposed time-lapse sequence was taken from Fregenal de la Sierra in southern Spain. The dark disk of the Moon dominates the lower right, while the Sun's textured surface shows several filaments and, over an edge, a prominence.

Gallery: Solar Eclipse
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Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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& Michigan Tech. U.

Expanded from APOD by Feed Readabilitifier.
20 Mar 20:41

Authentic Present

by Reza

auththentic-present

19 Mar 20:30

Photo



16 Mar 14:28

Artists, TV Series and Movie Directors Luciano Laborde





















Artists, TV Series and Movie Directors Luciano Laborde

20 Mar 15:16

Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal - Brains vs. Supercomputers

by admin@smbc-comics.com

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