Shared posts

17 Dec 13:24

Chinatown Ice Cream Factory to Add Second Scoop Shop on Lower East Side

by Stefanie Tuder

It will be in the New Essex Street Market

Historic ice cream shop Chinatown Ice Cream Factory has been chosen as one of three new vendors in the New Essex Street Market when it reopens fall 2018. It’s the first expansion for the beloved, family-owned Chinatown ice cream store, which peddles American classics alongside Asian-leaning flavors, such as black sesame and taro.

Second-generation owner Christina Seid said in a press release that she chose the market for the shop’s second location because of its “small local, family feel.” Beyond Chinatown Ice Cream Factory, the other new vendors are Essex Shambles, a downtown expansion of Harlem butcher Harlem Shambles, and Zerza, a fast-casual version of the Lower East Side Moroccan restaurant.

The search for new vendors by New York City Economic Development Corporation is part of the market’s move into its sleek new home across Delancey Street in one year, where there will be the addition of two full-service restaurants and 11 new vendors.

The move for the market has been a very long time coming, as part of Essex Crossing, a multi-block urban renewal development that encompasses 1.9 million square-feet of residential, commercial, and community space. Of the nine buildings in the development, beneath three of them will be the marketplace called the Market Line, which will include the Essex Street Market.

The New Essex Street Market sits on Essex between Broome and Delancey. There will be 39 vendors total; it’s public and mission-driven and will remain so in the move.

17 Dec 13:23

Cheetos Popcorn Is the Movie-Theater Concession Mash-up You’ve Been Waiting For

by Clint Rainey

Try not to wear your Chewbacca cosplay outfit to tonight’s Star Wars: The Last Jedi screening. That will make eating the Cheetos popcorn much, much messier. In a mash-up that makes you wonder why it took so long, Frito-Lay and Regal Cinemas are introducing the world’s highest form of...More »

17 Dec 13:22

Bob’s Burgers Pop-up Will Hit NYC Next Week

by Clint Rainey

People in Los Angeles lost it last year when a ten-day pop-up allowed them to savor the IRL flavor of Bob Belcher–inspired burgers. Now, New Yorkers will get the same opportunity: Alvin Cailan, purveyor of Eggslut’s world-historic breakfast sandwiches, oversaw the Bob’s Burgers shop in L.A. last December,...More »

17 Dec 12:55

woonyoung:Dino rhythmic gymnastics and Trex’s improvement....









woonyoung:

Dino rhythmic gymnastics and Trex’s improvement. Please enjoy~ :) 

17 Dec 12:54

All of my squares drawings thus far, presented in no particular...





















All of my squares drawings thus far, presented in no particular order! I really like drawing in this style~

If you want to get a print of one, they’re all available at my Society 6 by clicking here!

16 Dec 19:45

It's MY LIFE Fantasy Manga Launches Crowdfunding for Anime in January

Creators in Pack to produce anime about retired knight living with young witch
16 Dec 19:29

Crunchyroll Adds Meow Meow Japanese History Anime

The IDOLM@STER Cinderella Girls, Sengoku Basara, Daily Lives of High School Boys, Jormungand, Heat Guy J also added
16 Dec 19:17

Instant Strawberry Hot Cocoa Mix

by noreply@blogger.com (Heather Baird)

Rumor has it that today is National Cocoa Day! I'm not sure that pink strawberry hot cocoa was what they had in mind when the holiday was created, but that's okay. It's delicious and makes a super cute gift-in-a-jar.
Continued, click to read more...
05 Dec 11:05

All the Titles Fit to License, 2017 Edition

by reversethieves

There were more than twice the amount of manga licensed compared to anime this year. A whopping 240+ manga licenses were announced! That is surprising since the amount of titles picked up in 2016 had dropped from 2015 and were hovering closer to the low-100s. Even more shocking was that more than 70 of the 2017 titles were licensed by Seven Seas alone.

Anime licenses were hovering around 100 which is a little lower than last year. The big takeaway from this year was how little Funimation licensed with a mere 12 titles. Just 4 Aniplex licenses and none from Pony Canyon as well. Light novel licenses were about the same. And crowdfunding campaigns continued to increase but more on the creation side rather than the licensing side.

As a reminder, this list does not include streaming-only anime and manga. And as always, let us know if we missed anything.

Anime

Manga

Funded Crowdfunding Projects

Artbooks/Supplemental Material

Novels/Light Novels


Filed under: Anime, Books/Novels/Light Novels, Editorials, Manga
02 Dec 22:19

The Speakeasy #095: AnimeNYC

by reversethieves

All AnimeNYC 2017 coverage with guest Carl from Ogiue Maniax.

DOWNLOAD


Filed under: Anime, Conventions, Editorials, Events, Manga, NYCC, Podcasts, The Speakeasy
21 Nov 00:59

Recipe: Slow Cooker Pumpkin Spice Lattes — Recipes from The Kitchn

by Christine Gallary

With the holidays come long, lazy mornings spent hanging out with friends and family. Coffee is a must, but who wants to run out to the coffee shop for a fancy flavored latte? This recipe lets you keep a big batch of pumpkin spice lattes warm in the slow cooker and doesn't even require an espresso machine. Now you can cozy up and stay inside instead, sipping the quintessential coffee drink of fall.

READ MORE »

20 Nov 02:50

Akimine Kamijyō Launches Kobayashi Shōnen to Futei no Kaijin Manga on November 27

This year's 51st issue of Kodansha's Weekly Young Magazine announced on Monday that Akimine Kamijyō (Samurai Deeper Kyo, Code:Breaker) will launch the...
18 Nov 02:04

The Get Down's Justice Smith Stars in Legendary's Live-Action Pokémon Film

"Detective Pikachu" film starts production this year
17 Nov 00:27

Pre-Anime NYC 2017: New Anime Con in the City

by reversethieves

(note: No Type-Moon Weekly News Round Up
or All Points Bulletin this week.)

We’re attending the inaugural Anime NYC! Can New York City truly get a forever anime convention? Anime NYC hopes so!

PRE-ANIME NYC 2017 PODCAST

 

Our tentative schedule for the convention:

Friday
01:30 PM – Anime Fandom 15 Years Ago
03:30 PM – The Simulated Camera
04:30 PM – When Gundam Came to Hollywood
06:00 PM – What is HIDIVE?
07:30 PM – Beyond Bebop: Japanese Jazz
08:30 PM – Sports Anime for the Fujoshi
09:30 PM – Gender, Sexuality, and Psychology in Revolutionary Girl Utena

Saturday
11:00 AM – Saturday AM Industry Panel: Celebrating Four Years of Our Diverse Shonen Manga Magazine
11:45 AM – Fandom Interface
01:00 PM – Aniplex of America Industry Panel
02:00 PM – SUNRISE Industry Panel
03:00 PM – LeSean Thomas
03:00 PM – Fate/Grand Order Localization Panel
03:45 PM – Japanese Feminism 101
04:00 PM – Gundam Thunderbolt Panel with Naruyoshi Kikuchi
05:00 PM – Masaki Tachibana
06:00 PM – IDOLiSH7 US Premiere with Q&A
06:45 PM – The Women of Mobile Suit Gundam
08:45 PM – Exploring Dystopia in Attack on Titan, The Walking Dead, and Fahrenheit 451
09:45 PM – From Under The Bed: Horror In Anime & Manga

Sunday
11:30 AM – Gundam Thunderbolt: Bandit Flower Premiere and Concert
02:00 PM – Crunchyroll Simulcast Preview Panel
04:00 PM – Satoshi Kon: The Man, His Method, and Madness


Filed under: Conventions, Events
15 Nov 01:39

Seven Seas Licenses Dragon Goes House-Hunting Manga

Fantasy manga slated for September 2018
12 Nov 16:57

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017

by Michael

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Over two weekends in 2017 October, Kyoto Animation and subsidiary Animation Do held the third of what has become their once-every-two-years fan thanks event in Kyoto, following CTFK (Chūnibyō, Tamako, Free! and Kyōkai) in 2013 and Watashitachi wa, Ima!! (私たちは、いま!! This Is What We Are Now!!) in 2015. I had attended the 2015 event, and built my 2017 fall trip schedule around this new one, traveling around Shikoku during the week between the two sections. This year was the first to grow from one to two weekends, allowing the inclusion of screenings and concerts in the large auditorium at ROHM Theatre Kyoto. The exhibition and events returned at Miyako Messe across the street, this time expanding to include all main spaces in the convention center.

Advance Screenings and Concerts

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

The first weekend was a bit wet on account of Typhoon Lan approaching. Fortunately the ROHM Theatre has plenty of public accessible plazas and indoor spaces that are great for hiding from the rain.

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

In the afternoon on Saturday, October 21 I attended one of the two advance screenings, getting to see the first three episodes of Violet Evergarden. Fans that won the other ticket lottery returned in the evening for a screening of Free! -Take Your Marks- a week before the film was released in theaters.

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

The absence of a Japan-based setting gives Violet Evergarden a markedly different feel from everything that precedes it in the Kyoto Animation catalog. I’ll be curious to see as the series progresses if the art staff can create as convincing of a world without the benefit of being grounded in their own culture and design patterns.

After the episodes, True (Karasawa Miho) performed the series opening theme, which was part of the published schedule. Then voice actor and singer Chihara Minori appeared to perform the ending theme, which was a surprise gift.

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

The following day, the Freshman Wind Ensemble from the Senzoku Gakuen College of Music performed afternoon and evening concerts featuring the original soundtrack and classical works that were used in Hibike! Euphonium. This is also the group that recorded all of the wind ensemble music used in the series. Voice actors from the series narrated between works, and True performed the opening themes from each season.

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Stage Talks

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

On October 28 and 29, fans converged on Kyoto for the main event, the two day exhibition at Miyako Messe.

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

I managed to hit the jackpot with stage events this year, ending up with tickets for the director and producer talk, Kobayashi-san Chi no Meidoragon voice cast, Hibike! Euphonium voice cast, making of Violet Evergarden, and character designer talk. Though these were all a lot of fun, particularly the Meidoragon cast taking the stage in costume and in character, I felt there was less diversity among the talks compared with 2015. Despite the different titles, all seemed to converge on discussions of narrative choices and character designs. When the technical matters of animating a scene came up, they were presented briefly and in not too much detail, before moving on to a new topic. Background art was barely mentioned at all. While there is nothing wrong with this focus on the bigger picture and the most attention grabbing aspects of the works, two years ago it was actually the discussions with lower level staff and technicians that translate the directors’ wishes into a workflow to produce the end result that I found most interesting and engaging.

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Exhibition Halls

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

This year there was a substantial expansion of the exhibition space. In 2015 everything fit into one of the two large halls on the third level—the talk stage is setup in the other. In 2017 several sections were moved to the underground level, leaving the large third floor hall for wall-to-wall work products, including character designs, key frames, storyboards and background art. As with the stage events, up in the main hall it seemed as if emphasis on character related material often left little space for the balance of production elements. Every so often there would be a handful of painted backgrounds, but I didn’t come across any of the world mapping sketches or design models for places and objects that I saw in 2015. Nonetheless, what an amazing thing it is to get your face right up to an original sketch or run your finger (very gently) over the wrinkles and fingernail marks on a keyframe.

The underground level featured a bit of everything and I thought it was a good use of the extra space. Storyboards and keyframes for opening and ending sequences were given a dedicated room. The “Studio Zone”—staff working on material for works in production—also moved here and was able to accommodate a larger flow of people compared with 2015. There was also an area featuring works under KA Esuma (Kyoto Animation’s publishing imprint), a recurring showing of a short film featuring the studio’s badger mascot, and a greatly expanded photography zone that brought back the poster gallery and character panels, and included several new features.

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Photography Zone

Up in the main hall and in the smaller rooms on the underground level photography was not permitted, as was the case in the main exhibition areas in the past. The security need in the Studio Zone is apparent, but in 2015 I had wondered what the purpose of the restriction elsewhere might be. Having been through the drill twice, I get the sense that it’s done primarily to facilitate flow of the crowd through the hall and allow participants to get absorbed in the material without distractions, rather than a desire to restrict information dissemination. As one friend pointed out, it’s not often that you have the opportunity to see these things. Best to savor them with your full, undivided attention.

At the same time, there was a much appreciated acknowledgment of shutterbugs’ compulsive need to capture everything in a greatly expanded photography permitted area.

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

The KA Esuma area didn’t allow photography of the materials on display, though the Violet Evergarden panel was fair game.

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

The underground main hall featured only a fraction of the volume of materials in other areas, but everyone was free to shoot to his or her heart’s content.

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Exhibits

New in 2017, a series of exhibits summarized the studio’s output and milestone events over the recent several years.

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Special illustrations for this event

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kobayashi-san Chi no Meidoragon and Koe no Katachi

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Free!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Hibike! Euphonium

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Tamako Market and Chūnibyō demo Koi ga Shitai!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Musaigen no Phantom World and Kyōkai no Kanata

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Hibike! Euphonium

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Original sketch of the Violet Evergarden key visual

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Animator Desks

Also new, a group of staged work spaces featured more sketches, keyframes and storyboards.

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Violet Evergarden

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Chūnibyō demo Koi ga Shitai!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Free!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Hibike! Euphonium

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Backgrounds

Life-sized background art panels also appeared for the first time, allowing visitors to pose inside their favorite scene.

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Character Panels

Floor standing character panels returned, and this time all had backgrounds to go with them.

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Poster Gallery

The poster gallery also returned. Though only the most recent works were new to me, I decided to re-shoot the entire chronology with the benefit of a more even light source. (In 2015, the posters were lit with spot lamps that had a different color temperature from the hall lighting.) This time the colors are much more accurate and toning is more even, though I still got some glare from the overhead lamps. Next time I’ll remember to bring a polarizing filter.

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Banner Gallery

The wide advertising banners that are hung from the second floor balcony of the Kyoto Animation main office in Kohata lined the periphery of the hall. There were a handful of these on display in 2015, but this time they appear to include all from the past two years.

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

We likely won’t know for some time if and when there will be another event like this, but I wouldn’t mind seeing all of my 2D and 3D friends again in Kyoto in 2019.

Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 第3回京アニ&Doファン感謝イベント 私たちは、いま!!

* * * * * *
You're reading Kyoto Animation and Animation Do Fan Event 2017 by Michael Vito, originally posted at likeafishinwater.com. This post may be reused under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License, which requires crediting Michael Vito as the author, linking to the original post, the absence of any commercial purpose, such as banner and link advertising, and including the same Creative Commons license in the derivative work or reprint.

12 Nov 16:52

This Holiday Season, You Don’t Not Need Cake-Flavored White Pepsi

by Clint Rainey

It’s still too early to hawk anything holiday-themed, but nobody can blame Pepsi for jumping the gun after inventing this festive Christmas Cola concoction. It’s a soda that tastes like cake and comes in the cheerful white color pictured on the left — almost like if you licked the...More »

12 Nov 16:49

Comixology Has Some Good Sales Right Now

by Todd Allen
Every now and then, Comixology has a bunch of good sales overlapping at once.  And right now is one of those times.  They want to separate you from your money and they’re offering some lovely carrots to hit the buy button right now. Some recommendations in order of expiration: Expiring Monday 11/13: The key buy […]
05 Nov 12:32

The week in wildlife - in pictures

Vaquita, Fynbos flowers and the world’s only alpine parrot are among this week’s pick of images from the natural world

Continue reading...
04 Nov 22:56

Meet The Disney Artists Who Have Gone Indie With A New Company, Taiko Studios

by Amid Amidi

Details about a new studio and its first project, "One Small Step."

The post Meet The Disney Artists Who Have Gone Indie With A New Company, Taiko Studios appeared first on Cartoon Brew.

03 Nov 11:32

The Speakeasy #094: New York Comic Con, Final Fantasy: Lost Stranger, Blue Gale Xanbungle

by reversethieves

Ongoing Investigations: Final Fantasy: Lost Stranger and Blue Gale Xabungle.

Song: Blue Gale Xabungle OP “Shippu Xabungle” by Akira Kushida

Food for Thought: What anime do you keep meaning to watch, but never seem to get around to?

Topics: New York Comic Con

DOWNLOAD


Filed under: Anime, Conventions, Editorials, Events, Manga, NYCC, Podcasts, The Speakeasy Tagged: Blue Gale Xabungle, FInal Fantasy
29 Oct 12:19

Shake Shack Unleashes Chili on Its Dogs and Fries Next Week

by Stefanie Tuder

Plus, Hotel on Rivington is under fire for being loud

Chili arrives at Shake Shack

Just in time for actually colder weather, Shake Shack is debuting limited-time chili on its cheeseburgers, hot dogs, and fries. It’s a slow-braised beef chili with ancho and chile de arbol peppers, and the three options are available at all standalone Shacks starting Monday, October 30 on the app and in stores on Thursday, November 2.

Neighbors really hate Hotel on Rivington

Hotel on Rivington, which houses Cafe Medi, S’zen Lounge, Juice Press, and Jia, has received a whopping 182 recorded 311 complaints since opening mid-2016. One neighbor claims she was forced to move after less than a year because of “the purported threat to health, livelihood, and overall quality of life,” Bowery Boogie reports. Police have notified the State Liquor Authority of the situation.

Omakase lunch starts at Sushi Nakazawa

Blowing open its doors at lunchtime is Sushi Nakazawa, the three-star omakase restaurant in the West Village. It starts Monday, November 6, with reservations opening up on Wednesday, October 25. It’s the same offerings as at dinner: $150 before tax and tip, but now available Monday through Saturday at 11:30 a.m. and 1 p.m.

Checking in with Marcus Samuelsson

In a meandering interview, Red Rooster chef-owner Marcus Samuelsson touches on many aspects of his life, from cooking at the White House to running the NYC marathon. There doesn’t seem to be a driving force behind the story, but it provides some context into Samuelsson’s life. Coming up, Samuelsson will open a restaurant in Newark, New Jersey.

For Cincinnati’s favorite way to eat chili, watch below:

29 Oct 12:03

Depachika Delights: The Underground Food Halls of Tokyo

by Lily Crossley-Baxter
If you head underground, deep below the busy streets, you’ll find the best kept secret in Tokyo: the bustling markets of the city, aka depachika. Packed full of every treat you can imagine, from delicate French desserts to bottles of high-quality sake and bright displays of gleaming fresh fish, depachika are a food-lovers heaven. Beneath floors and floors of clothing and perfume, you’ll find the shelves stacked full of every treat you can imagine, families and pensioners hurrying to find the best deal on sushi or steak and countless shop assistants ready to welcome customers. The depachika name comes from a combination of two words: depato (the name for department stores) and chika (basement), which keeps it pretty simple. Ca

The post Depachika Delights: The Underground Food Halls of Tokyo appeared first on Tokyo Cheapo.

23 Oct 00:39

The Scarlet Thread of Murder

by Ho-Ling
忍ぶれど 色に出でにけり わが恋は
物や思ふと 人の問ふまで
(平兼盛)

Even though I hide it / my face betrays / my love 
So obviously that people ask me / what is on my mind
(Poem by Taira no Kanemori)
 
It's always such a long wait between the theatrical release of the annual Detective Conan film, and the release on home-video. Especially if friends from Japan and South Korea already start talking about it in the spring....

Detective Conan manga & movies:
Part 1: Volumes 1 ~ 10
Part 2: Volumes 11~20; The Timebombed Skyscraper (1) / The Fourteenth Target (2)
Part 3: Volumes 21~30; The Last Wizard of the Century (3) / Captured in Her Eyes (4)
Part 4: Volumes 31~40; Countdown to Heaven (5) / The Phantom of Baker Street (6)
Part 5: Volumes 41~50; Crossroad in the Ancient Capital (7) / Magician of the Silver Sky (8) / Strategy Above the Depths (9)
Part 6:  Volumes 51~60; Private Eyes' Requiem (10) / Jolly Roger in the Deep Azure (11)
Part 7: Volumes 61~70; Full Score of Fear (12) / The Raven Chaser (13) / Lost Ship in the Sky (14)
Part 8: Volumes 71~80; Quarter of Silence (15) / The Eleventh Striker (16) / Private Eye in the Distant Sea (17)
(You will find the links to the reviews of volumes 70, 72~76, 78, 82~93 and the films Quarter of Silence (15), The Eleventh Striker (16), Private Eye in the Distant Sea (17), Dimensional Sniper (18), Sunflowers of Inferno (19) and The Darkest Nightmare (20) in the library)

A prestigious nation-wide karuta competition for high schools will be held in a few days and a television program to promote the High School Satsuki Cup and the Satsuki Association behind the competition is being recorded at a television studio in Osaka. Both high-school-student-detective-turned-child Conan and high-school-student-detective-born-'n-raised-in-Osaka Hattori find themselves present in the studio: Conan is there because the Sleeping Detective Mouri Kogorou is invited as a guest for the program, while Hattori and his childhood friend Kazuha are there to cheer for their classmate Mikiko, who will also appear in the show as one of the participants in the competition. A bomb threat, and the detonation of said bombs however completely destroy the television studio, while the police also learns that one of the most talented karuta players of the Satsuki Association and organizer of the television program was murdered in his home. Mikiko was injured during the evacuation from the television station, preventing her from playing karuta, so Kazuha has to take her place at the High School Satsuki Cup, which is still going to be held even though it appears the bomber is after everything and everyone connected to the Satsuki Association. One of the possible targets is Oo'oka Momiji, a beautiful girl whom many believe to be the future karuta queen (champion), and who also claims she's Hattori's fiancée....

Detective Conan: The Crimson Love Letter (2017) is the twenty-first theatrical feature of Detective Conan. The first Conan film, The Time-Bombed Skyscraper was released in 1997 as a side-project to the animated television adaptation of Aoyama Goushou's hit mystery comic, intended to be the definite theatrical adaptation of the series. The enormous success however turned this into an annual event, and so every April, a new Detective Conan film is released in Japanese theaters. And now we have number twenty-one. That means that there are adults out there who have only known a world where there's a new Detective Conan film released every year. And even though this is the twenty-first film, it appears the audience still hasn't had enough of them: last year's The Darkest Nightmare became the highest grossing film in the franchise, but The Crimson Love Letter managed to break that record this year. Who knows what will happen next year?


Multiple directors have worked on the film series in those twenty-one years and each brought their own distinct taste. Kodama Kenji was responsible for the first seven films, and his films are perhaps best described as truly a "theatrical adaptation of Detective Conan", as these were fairly classic whodunnit mystery films, with usually about two big action set pieces per film to give it the necessary "theatrical feature" feeling. When Yamamoto Yasuichirou took over, the mystery plots were simplified in favor of longer and larger action scenes, with many of his films set at unique locations like flying airplanes or blimps, ships out on sea or a snowy mountain to support his panic-action film direction. The current director of the Detective Conan films is Shizuno Koubun, who really enjoys over-the-top action scenes, even more so than Yamamoto. The whodunnit mystery plots were also downplayed to suit Shizuno's focus on the action, with for example 2013's Private Eye in the Distant Sea basically being a political acton thriller, while 2016's The Darkest Nightmare didn't feature a mystery plot at all, but turned out to be a James Bond-esque spy thriller with grand action scenes. While I did enjoy most of Shizuno's Conan films, it should be noted his films were seldom really detective films: they were amusing action thrillers, but still very different from what Kodama did in the first seven films.

But then I heard that Ookura Takahiro would be writing the screenplay this time, which was certainly interesting. Most of the other Conan films were written by screenplay writers who also write for the television anime series (The Phantom of Baker Street's Nozawa Hisashi is a famous exception), but Ookura is a mystery author best known for his Lieutenant Fukuie novel series. Wouldn't this mean that we'd be getting a traditional mystery film now, I thought. And then the film was released in April, and slowly but surely I saw people comparing The Crimson Love Letter with the older Kodama films, and I knew I had to see it for myself. Ookura would also pen a few episodes for the Detective Conan animated series by the way, with one episode in particular serving as the prologue to The Crimson Love Letter.


So the home video release is finally here, and lo, The Crimson Love Letter is indeed a very entertaining mystery film. And more! But the overall atmosphere is indeed close to the earlier films directed by Kodama, with the murder investigation, and the ongoing investigation into the bombing and the link to the Satsuki Associatoin serving as the main plot. While the details of the mystery plot might be a bit easy to guess as there are awfully few suspects, I think this is one of the very few Conan films of the last few years of which I'm sure I'm going to remember the culprit. The Kodama films all had very memorable culprits with interesting motives, but with the focus shift to action, many Conan films of the last ten years tended to have rather nondescript murderers: their stories were often overshadowed by the true final act of their respective movies, which were more often than not gigantic action set pieces with a lot of explosions, things getting shot down or simply the force of nature being not very kind, and these events were often outside the control of the culprit, meaning the true "end" of each film was seldom a confrontation against a murderer, but one against circumstances. By the time the cast had survived that ordeal, you'd have forgotten about the culprit already. The Crimson Love Letter however features a memorable culprit, gives them the time to expand on their motive, which fits nicely with the mystery plot that also uses the karuta theme in a meaningful manner.

People not familiar with karuta might find it a bit hard to get into the film at first though, as very little is explained about the game. It's a competetive card game, based on an anthology of hundred poems from the Heian period. A reader will read the first part of one of those hundred poems aloud, and the two participants race to find the corresponding card with the second part of the poem. The cards are laid down between the two participants, and strategies involve placing the cards on your half of the field in certain formations and of course memorizing each poem and where each card is placed. The Crimson Love Letter spins an entertaining mystery tale using this theme, but I argue you could also watch this film not as a detective film, but as a sports film. Kazuha is drafted early in the tale to take Mikiko's place in the High School Satsuki Cup, and as she has a rivalry going on with the current karuta champion Momiji, you have all the makings for a classic sports film about a girl going against the odds in a competive sport competition (and we even have intense training scenes!). The film might be a bit brief on topics like strategies and more in-depth themes, so someone who knows absolutely nothing about karuta might feel a bit left behind, but I think this sports-competition-movie element works wonderfully as a secondary plotline, giving The Crimson Love Letter a natural climax to work towards to, instead of just towards more explosions (don't worry, there are plenty of explosions in this film).


The Crimson Love Letter was also heavily promoted as a romantic comedy featuring the Osaka-bred duo Hattori and Kazuha and the film was quite fun to watch as a rom-com too. We have often seen the two bicker and still have their sweet moments, and there are definitely a lot of comedic scenes with those two in the film, making The Crimson Love Letter an easy film to watch even for those unfamiliar with the series. The new major element for this film is of course Momiji, a rich girl and talent at karuta who claims Hattori is her fiancé, and who makes a bet with Kazuha about who will be allowed to marry him. Readers of the original comics will be vaguely aware of Momiji too: she was first introduced in a single panel in a story featured in volume 91 and has since then only made a few cryptic appearences, each barely one page long, in the original comic. This film is actually the first time her character is explored and explained in any way, but it appears she'll be appearing more often in the future too. 

The Conan films are by the way not written by series creator Aoyama Goushou, but he is a pretty hands-on supervisor on these annual productions: the basic premise of each movie is always suggested by him, he always draws several key animation frames himself and he often offers plot ideas for these films that are closely connected to his own manga storyline. For example, the reason why Ran's parents live seperately is never explored in detail in the comics, but it is explained in the second film The Fourteenth Target, and as said, the manga has told us very little about Momiji at this point, as it is considered to be explained within The Crimson Love Letter, even if the comics don't refer directly to the events of this film. The comic also featured a story about the karuta poems around the time of the film's release.



Many will be tempted to compare The Crimson Love Letter with the fan-favorite Crossroad in the Ancient Capital (2003) as both films feature both Heiji and Kazuha in starring roles and the setting in both Osaka and Kyoto (and Kuraki Mai doing the ending song for both films). I'd say they do feel similar, but Crossroad in the Ancient Capital is also clearly a Kodama film, with its emphasis on the murder investigation and Conan clearly in the leading role, while The Crimson Love Letter in turn is also clearly a Shizuno film, with its impressive action set pieces and the courage to give the spotlight and the more prominent exploits of the film not only to Conan, but other characters too (as seen earlier in earlier films like Dimensional Sniper and The Darkest Nightmare). In fact, Conan has some nice action scenes too in this film, but he is not even really the protagonist.

Detective Conan: The Crimson Love Letter in short feels like a return to the atmosphere of the earlier Conan films, with the emphasis on the mystery plot and the characters rather than just the action scenes. Mind you, there are still some fantastically over-the-top action scenes here that seems to prove these characters aren't human anymore, but with its focus on the main mystery plot, and the sports-competition and romantic comedy elements added, The Crimson Love Letter feels like the best balanced, and most complete Conan film of the last decade.

Original Japanese title(s): 『名探偵コナン から紅の恋歌(ラブレター)』
22 Oct 23:15

Why We Give Out Candy on Halloween: A Short History — Halloween Hospitality

by Claire Swinarski

Americans buy approximately 600 million pounds of candy for Halloween every year. If you're not sure what exactly that looks like, consider this: The Titanic weighed about 100 million pounds. Now, picture six Titanic ships made of candy. That's a lot of candy!

And it does make one wonder: Where did this sweet tradition get its start?

READ MORE »

22 Oct 11:39

Chronicling Japanese Folklore: The Ghosts and Monsters of Shigeru Mizuki

by Ada Palmer

Have you ever been walking along and felt the creepy, unsettling feeling that something was watching you? You may have met Betobeto-san, an invisible yōkai, or folklore creature, who follows along behind people on paths and roads, especially at night. To get rid of the creepy feeling, simply step aside and say, “Betobeto-san, please, go on ahead,” and he will politely go on his way.

What we know of Betobeto-san and hundreds of other fantastic creatures of Japan’s folklore tradition, we know largely thanks to the anthropological efforts of historian, biographer and folklorist, Shigeru Mizuki, one of the pillars of Japan’s post-WWII manga boom. A magnificent storyteller, Mizuki recorded, for the first time, hundreds of tales of ghosts and demons from Japan’s endangered rural folklore tradition, and with them one very special tale: his own experience of growing up in Japan in the 1920s through 1940s, when parades of water sprites and sparkling fox spirits gave way to parades of tanks and warships.

mizuki-shigeru-betobeto-san

Shigeru Mizuki’s illustration of Betobeto-san, Graphic World of Japanese Phantoms 講談社, 1985

Trickster-fox Kitsune, dangerous water-dwelling Kappa, playful raccoon-like Tanuki, and savage horned Oni are only the most famous of Japan’s vast menagerie of folklore monsters, whose more obscure characters range from the beautiful tentacle-haired Futakuchi Onna, to Tsukumogami, household objects like umbrellas and sandals that come alive on their 100th birthdays, and tease their owners by hopping away in time of need. Such yōkai stories have their roots in Japan’s unique religious background, whose hybrid of Buddhism with Shinto animism adds a unique moral and storytelling logic to these tales, present in no other folklore tradition, whose twists and turns—unexpected within Western horror conventions—are much of why fans of the weird, creepy and horrific find such extraordinary power in the creations of Japan. Most accounts of yōkai and Japanese ghosts are regional tales passed down at festivals and storytelling events in rural parts of Japan—and, like many oral traditions, they dwindled substantially over the nineteenth and twentieth centuries with the rise of cities, and of centralized and city-dominated entertainments provided by cheap printing, radio, film and television.

Shigeru Mizuki spent decades collecting these stories from all corners of Japan, and setting them down in comic book form, so they could be shared and enjoyed by children and parents across Japan and around the world, as he had enjoyed them in his childhood. While most of Japan’s 20th century manga masters had urban roots, Mizuki grew up in the small, coastal town of Sakaiminato, delighting in local legends told to him by a woman he describes in the memoir he titled after her, Nononba (the first Japanese work ever to win grand prize at the world famous Angoulême International Comics Festival.) Mizuki’s father was deeply interested in international culture, especially film, and even acquired the town’s first movie projector, hoping to connect his family and neighbors to the new arena of the silver screen. This childhood exposure to both local and global storytelling cultures combined to make him eager to present the wealth of Japan’s folklore on the world stage.

"Umibozu", 1985.

“Umibozu” illustration by Shigeru Mizuki, Graphic World of Japanese Phantoms 講談社, 1985.

Mizuki’s most beloved work Hakaba Kitaro (Graveyard Kitaro, also called GeGeGe no Kitaro) debuted in 1960, and follows the morbid but adorable zombie-like Kitaro, last survivor of a race of undead beings, who travels Japan accompanied by yōkai friends and the talking eyeball of his dead father. In different towns and villages, Kitaro meets humans who have run-ins with Japan’s spirits, ghosts and underworld creatures. Sometimes Kitaro helps the humans, but he often helps the spirits, or just sits back to watch and mock the humans’ ignorance of the netherworld with his signature creepy laugh “Ge… ge… ge…” Kitaro’s adventures also chronicle the social history of 20th century Japan, as the yōkai themselves struggle to adapt to cultural changes and economic doldrums, which lead to the closing of shrines, dwindling of offerings, and destruction of supernatural habitat. Adapted into dozens of animated series, movies and games, the popularity of Kitaro made yōkai tales a major genre, but Shigeru Mizuki’s signature remained his commitment to chronicling the rarest and most obscure stories of Japan’s remote villages, from the Oboroguruma, a living ox-cart with a monstrous face, reported in the town of Kamo near Kyoto, to the thundering Hizama spirit of the remote island of Okinoerabu. In fact, when a new animated movie of Kitaro was released in 2008, it screened in six different versions to feature the local folklore creatures of different regions of Japan. In addition to Hakaba Kitaro, Mizuki wrote books on folklore, and encyclopedias of Japanese ghosts and yōkai.

clash

Young Shigeru Mizuki visiting a shrine, from Nononba, Drawn & Quarterly edition.

Mizuki was also one of the most vivid chroniclers—and fiery critics—of the great trauma of Japan’s 20th century, the Second World War. Drafted into the imperial army in 1942, Mizuki experienced the worst of the Pacific front. His memoir Onward Toward Our Noble Deaths (whose English translation won a 2012 Eisner award) describes his experience: unwilling soldiers, starving and disease-ridden, sent on suicide runs by officers who punished even slight reluctance with vicious beatings. In fact Mizuki’s entire squad was ordered on a suicide march with explicitly no purpose except honorable death. Mizuki alone survived, but lost his arm, gaining in return a lifelong commitment to further the cause of peace and international cooperation. In earlier works—published when criticism of war was still unwelcome and dangerous in Japan—Mizuki voiced his critique obliquely, through depictions of Japan’s economic degeneration, and through his folklore creatures, which, in his tales, are only visible in times of peace, and are driven out and starved by war and violent hearts. Later he wrote more freely, battling historical revisionism and attempts to valorize the war, through works like his biography Adolph Hitler (now in English), and the unforgettable War and Japan, published in 1991 in the educational youth magazine The Sixth Grader, which confronted its young readers the realities of atrocities perpetrated by the Japanese army in China and Korea.

"Gegege no Kitaro" vol. 1, Japanese edition.

Gegege no Kitaro vol. 1, Japanese edition.

Mizuki’s magnificent 1988-9 history Showa (recently released in English translation) is a meticulous chronicle of Japanese culture and politics in the decades leading to and through the war. It shows the baby steps of a nation’s self-betrayal, how nationalism, cultural anxiety, partisan interests, and crisis-based fear-mongering caused Japan to make a hundred tiny decisions, each reasonable-seeming in the moment, which added up over time to a poisonous militarism which saturated the culture from the highest political circles all the way down to children’s schoolyard games. Its release in English is absolutely timely. If the dystopias which have so dominated recent media are tools for discussing the bad sides of our present, doomsday ‘what if’ scenarios where our social evils are cranked up to a hundred, Showa is the birth process of a real dystopia, the meticulously-researched step-by-step of how social evils did crank up to a hundred in real life, and the how the consequences wracked the world. Phrases like “slippery slope” are easy to apply in retrospect, but Showa paints the on-the-ground experience of being in the middle of the process of a nation going mad, making it possible to look with new, informed eyes at our present crisis and the small steps our peoples and governments are taking.

Shigeru Mizuki’s contributions to art, culture and humanitarianism have been recognized around the world, by the Kodansha Manga Award and Tezuka Osamu Cultural Prize, the Eisner Award and Angoulême festival, the Japanese Minister of Education award, Person of Cultural Merit award, and a special exhibit of his work for the 1995 Annual Tokyo Peace Day. His works have long been available in French, Italian and many other languages, but, despite Mizuki’s eager engagement with English-speaking fans and his eagerness to share his message with the world’s vast English-reading audiences, his works were slow to come out in English because his old-fashioned “cartoony” art style—much like that of his peer and fellow peace advocate “God of Comics” Osamu Tezuka—does not fit the tastes of American fans, accustomed to the later, flashier styles of contemporary anime. In Mizuki’s last years, thanks to the dedicated efforts of Montreal-based publisher Drawn and Quarterly, he finally oversaw the long-awaited English language release of his memoirs and histories, along with the Kitaro series (more volumes still coming out), which Drawn and Quarterly aptly describes as “the single most important manga you’ve never heard of, even if you happen to be a manga fan.”

Shigeru Mizuki, with his Eisner Award (2012)

Shigeru Mizuki, with his Eisner Award (2012)

One of Japan’s most delightful folklore traditions is Hyakumonogatari Kaidankai, a gathering of one hundred supernatural stories. A hundred candles are lit, and participants stay up all night telling tales of ghosts and spirits, extinguishing one candle at the end of each tale, so the room grows darker and darker, and the spirits—attracted by the invocation of their stories—draw near. A Hyakumonogatari Kaidankai is rarely finished, since few gatherings can supply a full hundred stories, and, as the dark draws in, most participants grow too frightened to snuff the last candle. But the millions touched by works of Shigeru Mizuki are well prepared to finish, armed with well over 100 stories, and with a powerful sense of the vigilance and hard work necessary if we want to welcome peaceful yōkai back to a more peaceful world.

This article was originally published in December 2015 in remembrance of Shigeru Mizuki.

Ada Palmer‘s is the author of Too Like the Lightning and Seven Surrenders, books 1 and 2 in the Terra Ignota series. She is a historian, working primarily on the Renaissance, Italy, and the history of philosophy, science, books and printing, heresy, and freethought, as well as manga, anime and Japanese pop culture. She writes the blog ExUrbe.com, and composes SF & Mythology-themed music for the a cappella group Sassafrass.

22 Oct 11:18

smashhitzine: Preorders OPEN through Nov 1st!SMASH HIT is a...





smashhitzine:

Preorders OPEN through Nov 1st!

SMASH HIT is a Boku no Hero Academia fanzine featuring superhero posters starring your favorite UA students, teachers, and more! It is a 6″x9″, softcover, perfect-bound book featuring 30+ pages of full-color illustrations from the following artists:

Angie NascaCCCRAZiECRiSSiEDango & ChainDanikaDroseattackEleEmFeastevilIllustratedacornsIzzyJinJoy YangLaura GuglielmoMandymapurlMaryametsweemichiMimsyNat RozeneenyaNoodleOllie YaoPhaistyRAVEFIRELLRemi PastakRomysaeTaylor MauldinTori RichardsTunaVivsXiu

Giveaway! Reblog this post for a chance to win a free copy of the zine, or a full refund if you’ve already pre-ordered! (One entry per person.)

22 Oct 11:17

My full piece for the BNHA @smashhitzine <3 You can preorder...



My full piece for the BNHA @smashhitzine <3 You can preorder here until Nov. 1st/17

22 Oct 11:11

Industry City Adds Japanese Mega Mart and Food Hall Akin to Eataly

by Stefanie Tuder

There will be six food stalls, an izakaya, a sake store, specialty grocery, and more

A food hall within a food hall is headed to Industry City: Marketed as a Japanese Eataly, Japan Village will take up 20,000 square feet in the sprawling Sunset Park commercial complex with six food stalls, an izakaya, a sake store, specialty grocery, and more.

Owners Tony Yoshida and Takuya Yoshida, who also own Michelin-starred Kyo Ya and grocery store Sunrise Mart, intend to make it feel like Japan in the U.S. Thus, a wide breadth of Japanese cuisine will be represented: made-to-order onigiri, bento boxes, breads and pastries, matcha, a juice bar, okonomiyaki, takoyaki, fresh mochi, ramen, sushi, soba, udon, donburiya, tempura, teppanyaki, and lots more. A Sunrise Market will also be a part of the space, per the Yoshidas’ background.

Japan Village is on track to open spring 2018 — much sooner than Anthony Bourdain’s supposedly still happening market — alongside restaurants like Burger Joint and Avocaderia, which are already in Industry City. It will be the third single cuisine-focused food hall in New York City, behind the Italian-focused Eataly and French Le District.

22 Oct 00:33

Anime Tamago 2018 Video Reveals Anime Shorts' Visuals, Stories

Shorts feature works by Imagica, Robot, Tomason, Usagi.Ou, Nanahoshi, Picona