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22 Jul 21:35

The Art of Urban Camping, Amsterdam Style

When you think of urban camping you might very well imagine pitching a tent in your friend's back garden or even sleeping on a park bench—solutions that are pragmatic in the moment but not the most inspired or exciting experiences. In an attempt to redefine urban camping, Dutch creatives Annette Van Driel and Francis Nijenhuis have taken over the outskirts of Amsterdam this summer with a unique installation/residence hybrid. 14 architects, designers and artists were invited by the duo to create temporary structures which can be experienced as a sculpture park by day and used as sleep pods by night. The result, which has already garnered visitors from all over the world, offers a unique melding of art and life.

View of campground and campfire, which has been dubbed "The Superfire." [Photo courtesy of Urban Campsite Amsterdam]

Urban Campsite Amsterdam (UCA) is situated in the newest part of Amsterdam, Centrumeiland, the most recent artificial island constructed in the Ijburg neighborhood—a residential area under development to deal with the city's housing shortage— surrounded by the Ij Lake. UCA's exploratory vision has found a great home in this area that exemplifies transition and experimental modes of living. As co-founder Van Driel remarks, "This beautiful piece of land has been a wasteland for a long time; I came up with the idea of a campsite with mobile art to show the outside world how nice the island is."

When setting out to plan the project, "ordinary" was the last thing the dynamic Dutch duo was going for. Embracing the art of urban camping as a collective experience, they created a whole campus including an herb garden staffed by local architecture students, a space for conducting various DIY workshops and a local supermarket as well as a working kitchen and bathroom facilities. Once you have settled in, hammocks provide a place for quiet reflection while a central campfire offers a space for conversation and community. The fire is a keen symbol of UCA's larger goal of encouraging a melting pot of creative minds. "People come from all over the world; we have people from New Zealand and local people from Ijburg sitting next to each other at the campsite," explains Van Driel. This sentiment is shared by the artists and designers who built the installations in an attempt to push the boundaries of how we view and interact with the built environment.

View of the Tribal Toilet Tower by Atelier van Lieshout, made out of discarded ship parts. [Photo courtesy of Urban Campsite Amsterdam]

For the designers, the brief was simple. With sustainability being one of the most important goals of the project, the only stipulation was that the materials the designers selected had to be used in a different way than their intended purpose. As Van Driel notes, this sense of transformation permeates the entire project. "The aim of the installation is to change your view of the surroundings. The installations connect the guests to the place and to the elements of air, sand and water which surround them."

View of campground with Frank Bloem's Kite Cabin in the foreground and Boomhuttenfest's Solid Family and Arjen Boerstra's Attic in the background. [Photo courtesy of Urban Campsite Amsterdam]

Think of UCA as a magical traveling circus, a unique place for exploration where our ideas of architecture and design are pushed to new limits. While UCA cries out for a wider audience to be fully appreciated the world over, Van Driel and Nijenhuis are reluctant to embrace the idea of expansion—at least for the time being. Any moves to other cities would have to maintain the personal touches they have infused the site with. "For us, it's not only a concept but something we really like doing. If somebody else ran the campsite it would be totally different," explains Van Driel. In the meantime, many of the artists remain optimistic that they will be able to find a second home for their structures.

UCA remains open through August 31th. To experience this site for yourself, reservations for each shelter can be made through Airbnb.

Upside Down You Turn Me by Rob Sweere. [Photo courtesy of Urban Campsite Amsterdam]
View of bed inside Upside Down You Turn Me. [Photo courtesy of Urban Campsite Amsterdam]
Three hemispherical windows give multiple—sometimes whimsical—views. [Photo courtesy of Urban Campsite Amsterdam]
Shrink Wrap House by Refunc, made of industrial metal baskets and shrink wrap. [Photo courtesy of Urban Campsite Amsterdam]
Interior view of Shrink Wrap House. [Photo courtesy of Urban Campsite Amsterdam]
Universe 7 by Robbert van der Horst. "With Universe 7, I've tried to escape and to create a possibility for solitude. The sphere itself represents both a globe and traveling in space, yet it is very grounded at the same time. I hope that people who come and sleep in Universe 7 experience a sense of place, and redefine or re-locate themselves while looking at the horizon." [Photo courtesy of Urban Campsite Amsterdam]
Bedbug by Ronnie Kommene & Franka te Lintel Hekkert, made of discarded wood and insulation materials. [Photo courtesy of Urban Campsite Amsterdam]
Interior view of Bedbug. [Photo courtesy of Urban Campsite Amsterdam]
Carved From Wood by Studio Plots. [Photo courtesy of Urban Campsite Amsterdam]
Interior view of Carved From Wood. "The natural materials give an extra dimension to the experience. The interior almost feels like a church...the arcs create a stunning effect," note the designers. [Photo courtesy of Urban Campsite Amsterdam]
Val Ross by Mud Projects. [Photo courtesy of Urban Campsite Amsterdam]
Interior view of Val Ross. "There is so much you can recycle/recreate yourself. For most people the lack of money is the motivator to recycle but it should be about respect for everything around you that will inspire you to re-use your waste," explains the designer. [Photo courtesy of Urban Campsite Amsterdam]
27 Jul 00:00

Seneca

"I shall never be ashamed of citing a bad author if the line is good."
27 Jul 13:30

Artist paints amazing 3D illusions on his hands

by David Pescovitz
screenshot

Italian makeup artist Luca Luce paints incredible 3D illusions on his hands. See even more at his Instagram and Facebook page.

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screenshot

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27 Jul 11:00

How to Photoshop 150 Images Into One Creepy Suburbia

by Laura Mallonee
How to Photoshop 150 Images Into One Creepy Suburbia

Eric Tomberlin makes a Microsoft housing development look extremely claustrophobic.

The post How to Photoshop 150 Images Into One Creepy Suburbia appeared first on WIRED.











24 Jul 02:47

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26 Jul 20:00

Simple Rules of Thumb for Decorating Your Walls 

by Kristin Wong

If you don’t have an eye for design, you might not know where to start when it comes to putting art on your walls. You can always go with your gut, but this infographic lays out some basic rules that make it simple.

Read more...

26 Jul 17:44

maryjanes-reflection: sosuperawesome: Morgan Davidson, on...

A. Kachmar

Amazing, hard to believe they are done with only color pencils, some of them look airbrushed. Quite a talent.





















maryjanes-reflection:

sosuperawesome:

Morgan Davidson, on Tumblr

YO. this should be on EVERYBODY’S BLOG

My pencil crayons never worked this much magicXD

25 Jul 16:34

Police Officers Responding to Millions of Mayflies Swarming the Sabula-Savanna Bridge in Iowa

by Scott Beale

deisel1984 uploaded an insane video of a Sabula, Iowa police officer requesting Iowa Department of Transportation to help with a swarm of millions of mayflies (shadflies) that had taken over the Sabula-Savanna Bridge that crosses the Mississippi River. The DOT had to use a snowplow to clear the bridge.

Sabula Iowa Police department was called to assist a motorist on the Sabula Savanna bridge. When the officer arrived he realized what had happened. Millions of shad-flies had hatched and made the bridge like ice. There were literally inches of the bugs on the ground. Crews from the Sabula Fire, Savanna Fire, and both Iowa and Illinois DOT were on scene to help clean up the mess.

via WQAD

26 Jul 12:07

Artificial limbs from 1900 were decades ahead of their time

by Alex Arbuckle
Prosthesis
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Image: James Gillingham/SSPL/Getty Images

The genius Gepetto of prosthetic devices
Mark Rowley

James Gillingham ran an ordinary shoemaking business, the Golden Boot, in Chard, England. In 1866, he met a man who had lost an arm in a cannon mishap and had been told by doctors that there was nothing to be done about it.

Eager to put his craftsmanship to test, Gillingham offered to make the man a new arm for free.

The new leather limb he built was strong and rigid but also perfectly fitted. The medical world noticed his talent, and Gillingham soon began producing a variety of artificial limbs.

Using a secret process wherein he molded the leather to the client’s limb before hardening it, Gillingham started a business making prostheses Read more...

More about Tech, History, Social Good, Health Fitness, and Lifestyle
26 Jul 12:00

See How a Brooklyn Artist is Creating a Miniature Scale-Model of a Gothic Cathedral from Scratch

by Eric Oh
Apse Floor. Image Courtesy of Ryan McAmis
Apse Floor. Image Courtesy of Ryan McAmis

Ryan McAmis, an artist from Brooklyn, New York, is designing and building a miniature, scale model of a late Gothic Italian Cathedral, recreating everything from the stained glass windows to the vaulted ceiling, wall tombs and paintings. He first creates the pieces from a variety of materials, ranging from hand scribed brickwork on treated paper, to clay and wood. He then combines the materials together and creates a silicon mold, casting each piece in white plastic to be hand painted later. See more photos and read about his process after the break.

Round Windows. Image Courtesy of Ryan McAmis Fresco. Image Courtesy of Ryan McAmis Window. Image Courtesy of Ryan McAmis Apse and Tomb. Image Courtesy of Ryan McAmis

Tomb Lions. Image Courtesy of Ryan McAmis
Tomb Lions. Image Courtesy of Ryan McAmis

To create the stained glass, McAmis lays out a pattern in Photoshop and prints it onto a transparent material. The impression of 600-year old leaded glass is created with a small clay tool used to burnish each piece.

Apse Ceiling. Image Courtesy of Ryan McAmis
Apse Ceiling. Image Courtesy of Ryan McAmis
St. Mark Sculpture. Image Courtesy of Ryan McAmis
St. Mark Sculpture. Image Courtesy of Ryan McAmis
Cornice. Image Courtesy of Ryan McAmis
Cornice. Image Courtesy of Ryan McAmis

To create the flooring, the design is again laid out in Photoshop, then printed onto archival paper. After gluing the paper to the floor, and varnishing and sanding several times, a small, sharp clay tool is used to scribe the granite tiles.

Floor Tomb. Image Courtesy of Ryan McAmis
Floor Tomb. Image Courtesy of Ryan McAmis
Frame. Image Courtesy of Ryan McAmis
Frame. Image Courtesy of Ryan McAmis
Savanarola Chair. Image Courtesy of Ryan McAmis
Savanarola Chair. Image Courtesy of Ryan McAmis

McAmis estimates that the project will take several years to complete. Stay up to date with the process and see his other work on his website here.

23 Jul 20:42

Vivien Muller Designs A Little Cyclops Monster That Charges Smart Watches

by Erin
23 Jul 21:45

This Home Has Separate Small Stairs For Small Dogs

by Erin
24 Jul 21:52

Grumpy Catipus, A Fabulously Hand Made Knit Figure That Combines Grumpy Cat With an Octopus

by Lori Dorn

Grumpy Catipus

Artist Zane Uzklinge of Pomegranate Wolf has created “Grumpy Catipus” a fabulous knit figure that combines the adorable surliness of Grumpy Cat with the multiple limbs of an octopus.

One day on some fun page I found a photoshopped image where there was a Cat with Octopus tentacles. I found that so funny and in somehow very cute, so I decide I need to try make one by my own. And that Catipus saw one really sweet girl, and she ask me- can I make one for her too, but like Grumpy cat face. And I did- So here is result. Catipus have 8 tentacles, Cat ears and small black cylinder hat. Made from acrylic and mohair yarns and filled with polyester toy filling. In mixed technique- some parts are crochet , some- knitted. Those deep blue eyes are hand painted with acrylic paints on plastic safety eyes.Catipus is small, but not tiny, his dimensions are :
hight 11.5 cm (4.5 inch) and Ø aprox 13 cm (5.1 inch)

Grumpy Catipus and other items are available for purchase through the Pomegranate Wolf Etsy shop.

Grumpy Catipus

Grumpy Catipus

Hiding Grumpy Catipus

images via Pomegranate Wolf

via Bored Panda

26 Jul 01:37

How I think American media works

24 Jul 10:40

Photo



21 Jul 01:24

Read 700 Free eBooks Made Available by the University of California Press

23 Jul 20:01

Universal's agents send Google a censorship demand for "127.0.0.1"

by Cory Doctorow


127.0.0.1 is the "loopback" address for your Internet stack, the address you tell your computer to visit when you want it to talk to itself.

Links to 127.0.0.1 just go to your own computer -- it's like asking your computer to knock on its own door. Not understanding this is directly analogous to not being able to find your own ass with both hands.

The same division of Universal also went after the IMDB page for Furious 7, which is apparently a movie of some description.

And while we’re on the topic of self censorship, it’s worth noting that Universal Pictures also asked Google, in a separate notice, to remove http://127.0.0.1 from the search results.

The mistakes were made by the French branch of the movie studio, which only recently began sending takedown notices to Google. The company has reported less than 200 URLs thus far including the mistakes above.

While Universal is the rightsholder, it’s worth noting the notices are sent by Trident Media Guard (TMG), the private company which also carried out file-sharing network monitoring for the French Government’s Hadopi scheme.

Universal Asks Google to Censor “Furious 7″ IMDb Page, and More [Ernesto/Torrentfreak]

(via Techdirt)

23 Jul 13:30

19 Notable Figures Who Left Architecture to Follow Other Career Paths

by Finn MacLeod

What do Ice Cube, the members of Pink Floyd, and Seal have in common with fashion icon Tom Ford and former president Thomas Jefferson? They all studied architecture. Perhaps a representation of the diversity of talents in architecture studios, household names like Samuel L. Jackson and Courteney Cox found their footing as students of architecture prior to reaching success in other fields. 

We've put together a list of some of the most unexpected names gracing the yearbooks of architecture schools from around the world, including the likes of Queen Noor of Jordan and George Takei of Star Trek fame. Discover "Weird Al" Yankovic's true (architectural) passions after the break.

Queen Noor of Jordan. Image via Flickr Creative Commons user Skoll World Forum Monticello by Thomas Jefferson. Image via Flickr Creative Commons user Eric Langhorst Ice Cube. Image via Flickr Creative Commons user Eva Rinaldi George Takei. Image via Flickr Creative Commons user TEDxKyoto

Roger Waters, Nick Mason and Richard Wright

Three of Pink Floyd's five founding members, Waters, Mason, and Wright met while studying architecture at Regent Street Polytechnic in London, now known as the University of Westminster. After two years of architectural studies, Waters was dismissed due to a lack of interest in the history of building design and thorough disdain for critiques. The three would ultimately leave Westminster to pursue music, and have attributed inspiration for the iconic ballad "The Wall" to their time at Westminster. In 1969, Pink Floyd released "Music for Architectural Students," an album dedicated to their period spent in studio.

Ice Cube

Ice Cube. Image via Flickr Creative Commons user Eva Rinaldi
Ice Cube. Image via Flickr Creative Commons user Eva Rinaldi

Perhaps the most surprising entry on this list, American rapper Ice Cube studied architectural drafting at the Phoenix Institute of Technology beginning in 1987, earning a diploma in draughtsmanship a year later. Ice Cube is said to have been inspired by the architecture of Southern California, particularly by the designs of The Eames House. Shortly after founding hip hop group N.W.A., Ice Cube began his studies in architecture as a failsafe for his career in music.

Bill Gaytten

Best known as the creative director of fashion house John Galliano, Gaytten began as a student of the Bartlett School of Architecture at University College London. Upon completion of his studies, Gaytten found himself working for designer Victor Edelstein, followed by a 23-year stint at Dior before taking the helm at Galliano after the departure of its namesake. 

Queen Noor of the Kingdom of Jordan

Queen Noor of Jordan. Image via Flickr Creative Commons user Skoll World Forum
Queen Noor of Jordan. Image via Flickr Creative Commons user Skoll World Forum

Born Lisa Halaby of Washington, D.C., Jordan's Queen Consort and widow to former King Hussein studied architecture and urban planning at Princeton University. Entering university in 1969, Noor belonged to Princeton's first co-educational class. Upon graduation, Noor traveled to first Australia to pursue her career as an architect, subsequently accepting a job with British firm Llewelyn-Davies Weeks to work on a masterplan for Tehran. Shortly thereafter, Noor met Hussein and moved to Jordan, and has since served as a philanthropist and activist on an array of issues worldwide.

Seal

Seal. Image © Featureflash / Shutterstock.com
Seal. Image © Featureflash / Shutterstock.com

Infamous singer of "Kiss by a Rose" and former husband to model Heidi Klum, Seal - born Henry Olusegun Adeola Samuelstudied architecture in London. After two years of study, Seal received an associate degree in architecture, subsequently working at a series of firms while concurrently developing an interest in music. 

Samuel L. Jackson

Samuel L Jackson. Image © DFree / Shutterstock.com
Samuel L Jackson. Image © DFree / Shutterstock.com

Prolific American actor Samuel L. Jackson first embarked on architectural studies at Morehouse College in Atlanta before transferring to dramatic arts. Unsurprisingly, Jackson graduated in 1972 with a degree in acting, subsequently abandoning his interest in architecture in favour of a career in film.

Courteney Cox

Courteney Cox. Helga Esteb / Shutterstock.com
Courteney Cox. Helga Esteb / Shutterstock.com

Best known for her role as Monica Geller on sitcom 'Friends,' Cox briefly studied architecture at Mount Vernon College in Washington D.C. Partially into her degree Cox withdrew to pursue a modelling career in New York City.

Tom Ford

Tom Ford. Image © Joe Seer / Shutterstock.com
Tom Ford. Image © Joe Seer / Shutterstock.com

Before launching his iconic self-named brand, American Fashion designer and filmmaker Tom Ford studied architecture at New York's Parsons School of Design at The New School. Ford spent a portion of his degree studying at the school's Paris campus, discovering French architecture and fashion simultaneously. Ford's architectural influences can be seen in his film "A Single Man," set in a 1960s modernist Los Angeles bungalow. 

Aishwarya Rai

Aishwarya Rai. Image © Ilona Ignatova / Shutterstock.com
Aishwarya Rai. Image © Ilona Ignatova / Shutterstock.com

Known across India as one of Bollywood's most successful actors, Rai enrolled in architecture at Rachna College of Arts and Commerce in Mumbai prior to her success in film. After a brief period of architectural study Rai began a pursuit of modelling, ultimately winning the Miss World Pageant for India in 1994.

George Takei

George Takei. Image via Flickr Creative Commons user TEDxKyoto
George Takei. Image via Flickr Creative Commons user TEDxKyoto

Primarily known for his role as Hikaru Sulu on Star Trek, George Takei began as a student of architecture at University of California, Berkeley. Takei pursued architecture for a brief period, choosing to transfer his studies to the dramatic arts before beginning a highly successful career on television. 

Thomas Hardy

Thomas Hardy
Thomas Hardy

Born in 1840, Hardy was an English novelist and poet and was known to be admired by then aspiring writer Virginia Woolf. Hardy began as an apprentice at the age of sixteen, working under architect Thomas Hicks before beginning his formal education in Dorchester, and subsequently King's College London. Before beginning his career as a writer, Hardy won numerous awards from the Royal Institute of British Architects and the Architectural Association, in addition to his role in the construction of London's historic St. Pancras Station

Art Garfunkel

One half of the infamous duo Simon & Garfunkel, Art Garfunkel is a dynamic player in the arts community, having dabbled in music, film, poetry, and architecture. Garfunkel attended Columbia University in New York City where he studied architecture, ultimately graduating with a degree in art history in 1962. Curiously, Garfunkel completed a graduate degree in mathematics in 1967 and began work on a doctorate in the same field, abandoning it at the peak of Simon & Garfunkel's success. In 1969, the band recorded "So Long, Frank Lloyd Wright," an homage to one of Garfunkel's architectural heroes. 

Benjamin Netanyahu

Benjamin Netanyahu. Image © yakub88 / Shutterstock.com
Benjamin Netanyahu. Image © yakub88 / Shutterstock.com

Israel's current Prime Minister holds two degrees from MIT, one in architecture and another in management. Netanyahu's time at MIT was defined by a period of instability in his home country, leading him to complete his four year architecture degree in two and a half in order to return to his role in the military. When describing his former student, MIT Architecture Professor Emeritus Leon B. Groisser said of Netanyahu: "He was very bright. Organized. Strong. Powerful. He knew what he wanted to do and how to get it done."

Thomas Jefferson

Thomas Jefferson
Thomas Jefferson

Jefferson was indeed a practicing architect, but led a double life as President of the United States. He gained some success as an architect despite an absence of formal training: he learned all he knew from books on classical European architecture, notably Palladio's The Four Books of Architecture. He was particularly inspired by Italian architecture and is credited with the introduction of numerous Palladian elements to the American architectural landscape. In 1772, Jefferson built a residence for himself in Virginia and named it Monticello. The house consequently established what would be later known as 'Jeffersonian Architecture.'

"Weird Al" Yankovic

Weird Al Yankovic. Image © s_bukley / Shutterstock.com
Weird Al Yankovic. Image © s_bukley / Shutterstock.com

Born Alfred Matthew Yankovic, the parody artist studied at California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo, graduating with a degree in architecture. Yankovic's career took a sharp turn away from architecture shortly after completion of his degree, beginning a multi-decades long career in music and record production. 

James "Jimmy" Stewart

Jimmy "James" Stewart
Jimmy "James" Stewart

Star of It's a Wonderful Life and frequent co-star of Katharine Hepburn, Stewart studied architecture at Princeton University in New Jersey. Although he aspired to be a pilot for the United States Navy, his father persuaded him to attend Princeton where he excelled as a student and was awarded a graduate scholarship for his design of an airport terminal. Stewart never pursued graduate studies in architecture, but went on to enjoy a highly successful career and appeared in over 92 films.

Ralf Hütter

Image © Miroslav Bolek. CC BY-SA 3.0
Image © Miroslav Bolek. CC BY-SA 3.0

The founder, lead singer and keyboardist for German band Kraftwerk didn't come from musical beginnings: he trained as an architect. Although little is known about his architectural studies, in an interview with the New Zealand Herald, Hütter said: "constructing music and live performance comes from the same spirit." Hütter has since hinted that he will pursue his interests in architecture when Kraftwerk disbands.

Bonus: Kanye West

A photo posted by Noam Dvir (@dvirnm) on

Although not formally trained in architecture, West has a close affinity to the profession, often publicly reinforcing his close relationships to an array of architects and designers. In 2012, West collaborated with Rem Koolhaas to create a seven screen performance pavilion in for the Cannes Film Festival. Shortly thereafter in 2013, West gave an impromptu lecture in the studios of the Harvard Graduate School of Design, inspiring a formidable argument by GSD student Sekou Cooke entitled "Keep Talking Kanye: An Architect's Defense of Kanye West."

Have any to add to our list? Comment below.

 

23 Jul 19:00

Lonely People Have Social Skills, They're Just Too Anxious to Use Them

by Shaunacy Ferro

A new psychology study finds that performance anxiety hinders lonely people's social interactions.

23 Jul 10:58

British airline easyJet accused of selling seats that don't exist

by Blathnaid Healy
A. Kachmar

I thought all airlines did that. Aside if easyjet is shitty or not, she decided not to pay the $93 and let her daughter stay behind?! Who was taught a lesson here.

Easyjet1
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LONDON — British budget airline easyJet has been accused of overselling seats at the peak of the summer holiday season, according to a report by The Independent

The airline, which flies 700 different routes in 32 countries, is selling seats that don't exist, according to the paper, leading some passengers with tickets to take other routes to reach their destinations

Former professional British tennis player Annabel Croft tweeted that her daughter was left behind on a recent family holiday to Portugal because the flight was oversold and when she asked if she could stay with her she was told she'd be charged an additional £60 ($93). Read more...

More about Uk, Travel, Easyjet, Lifestyle, and Travel Leisure
22 Jul 18:07

Alcoholic Architecture, A Unique Pop-Up Event in London That Features a Walk-In Cloud of Vaporized Cocktails

by Lori Dorn

Straw

In 2009, event producers Bompas & Parr created Alcoholic Architecture, a unique pop-up experience in which vaporized gin and tonics filled a room for participants to inhale and absorb.

Visitors donned protective suits and stepped into a mist of vaporised gin and tonic, which they imbibed through inhaling. Doctors were our mixologists for the event, performing a complex series of calculations to calibrate the ratio of alcohol to mixer. Vaporising the cocktail heightened the flavour of the G&T and reduced visibility to less than a meter. Taste became spatialised as a public realm, scaled up from bodily interior to building interior. In this way the cocktail became architecture – an immersive, habitable environment.

A similar experience is being recreated by Bompas & Parr at London’s Borough Market, premiering July 31, 2015 and continuing throughout the month of August 2015. Tickets are available online.

Bompas & Parr’s Alcoholic Architecture arrives in Borough Market, featuring a walk-in cloud of breathable cocktail as part of an installation that explodes drinks to the scale of architecture. In this fully immersive alcohol environment- the cloud is entirely composed of fine spirits and mixer at a ratio of 1:3 and made using powerful humidifiers to super-saturate the air- alcohol enters the bloodstream through primarily the lungs but also the eyeballs. …Visits to Alcoholic Architecture are based on timed entries and experiences are limited to a maximum of 50 minutes per group.

Alcoholic Architecture

Gin Mist

Alcoholic Architecture Red

Henricks

images via Alcoholic Architecture

via The Creator’s Project

22 Jul 20:28

A Wonderful Series of Beautifully Detailed Drawings Created From Coffee

by Lori Dorn

Under the Same Umbrella
Under the Same Umbrella

Indonesian artist Ghidaq al-Nizar has created a wonderful series of detailed drawings that he made using coffee as his primary medium under the hastag #zerowastecoffee. Ghidaq spoke with Websta Diaries about how he started his coffee and latte art projects.

I am very “spoiled” when it comes to coffee. It’s not only my tongue having coffee but also my eyes enjoying it. So I began to make my own latte art, drew it as beautiful as I wanted it to be. From that moment, my adventure began. My #zerowastecoffee art started one morning when I was too lazy to make a milk foam (for etching my coffee). I went to the kitchen, made a cup of ground coffee. When I came to the bottom of the cup, I saw the grounds! I imagined Grim was there, a fictional creature from Harry Potter. My mind and hands began to work [on them], eventually impressing myself. Sometimes, you don’t need to think too much – just see and feel.

Fairies
Fairies

Leaf
Leaf

The Stag
The Stag

Walt Disney
Walt Disney

Man With His Moon
Man With His Moon

Together in Paris
Together in Paris

images via Ghidaq al-Nizar

via Websta Diaries, My Modern Met

22 Jul 23:56

“I taught my dog and cat both how to fistbump!”

by Xeni Jardin

ezgif-963615913

You can teach a dog to fistbump. It appears that you cannot actually teach a cat to do so.

Full size GIF here.

[IMGUR]

23 Jul 00:10

Need a new reason to hate Donald Trump? His speaker fee is a quarter million bucks

by Xeni Jardin
trump

Donald Trump earns roughly $250,000 per speech, and owes $265 million (maybe more) in debt. He gets $110,000 a year from a Screen Actors Guild pension, and he has at least $1.4 billion in assets.

The New York Times digs in to Trump’s financial disclosure form, filed with the Federal Election Commission last week and released on Wednesday.

Like Mr. Trump’s favorite adjective, “huge,” his disclosure form is mammoth, clocking in at an astonishing 92 pages, far longer than from anyone else in the 2016 presidential field. It shows that Mr. Trump holds executive-level positions or financial stakes with 515 entities from New York to Dubai to Brazil.

When he filed the disclosure, he said in a news release that his wealth was over “TEN BILLION DOLLARS,” using the capital letters. It was not immediately clear whether the document would corroborate that figure. Mr. Trump’s net worth is a source of consternation: in a legal deposition, he once declared that it can fluctuate with his feelings.

Donald Trump Discloses $265 Million in Debt and $110,000 Actor’s Pension [NYT]

22 Jul 21:32

Why Do Cicadas Emerge at Prime Intervals of 13 and 17 Years?

by Robbie Gonzalez

Mathematicians are fond of prime numbers. Infinitely numerous yet utterly unique, they play an integral role in number theory and a baffling one in such longstanding mysteries as Goldbach’s conjecture. Nature is partial to primes, as well, as demonstrated by the dramatic 13- and 17-year life cycles of periodic cicadas.

Read more...










20 Jul 21:11

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20 Jul 01:04

Photo

by hellabeautiful


22 Jul 13:50

Photo



22 Jul 00:26

ceemee: cali-cocaine: Ooops Haaaaa



ceemee:

cali-cocaine:

Ooops

Haaaaa

22 Jul 22:00

You’re all welcome!Bucharest by DincoloDeFatade



















You’re all welcome!

Bucharest by DincoloDeFatade