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29 Oct 07:57

Mangeurs d'âmes

by Filo Loco
Pierre Fromentin. André Bonne Editeur. 1958.
Filo Loco
07 Oct 08:54

The Parisianer

by admin

Parisianer-page-E-Ponzi

The Parisianer

The Parisianer est né de l’envie de deux illustrateurs parisiens de réunir un grand nombre d’artistes autour d’un projet : réaliser la Une d’un magazine imaginaire qui exprimerait sa vision subjective de Paris.
En hommage au couvertures du New Yorker, cet exercice de style présenterait un panel d’interprétations poétiques, éclectiques et surprenantes de la capitale.
Read more here

19 Oct 01:21

The Civic Minimum

by Geoff Manaugh
[Image: From Gravesend—The Death of Community by Chris Clarke].

Gravesend is a suburb east of London, hosting on its own eastern edge something of a secondary suburb: a mysterious town on the edge of town that turns out not to be a town at all.

It is a simulated English village built in 2003 by the Metropolitan Police working with Equion Facilities Management and a firm called Advanced Interactive Systems (AIS).

The barren streets and hollow buildings of this militarized non-place were designed for use as an immersive staging ground for police-training exercises, fighting staged riots, burglaries, bank robberies, and other crimes.

[Image: From Gravesend—The Death of Community by Chris Clarke].

Facades with no buildings behind them line the empty streets; in some cases, it is only through the aerial views afforded by a service like Google Maps that this reality is made clear.

Imitation bus stops, make-believe banks, and an oddly whimsical Pizzaland—like an end-times chain restaurant from Shaun of the Dead—sustain the illusion on the ground.

[Image: From Gravesend—The Death of Community by Chris Clarke].

Somewhat incongruously, an airplane fuselage also now rests beside a chainlink fence near the roadway, giving officers an opportunity to prepare for airplane hijackings.

There are even empty Tube carriages parked outside town for improvisatory police raids.

[Image: From Gravesend—The Death of Community by Chris Clarke].

According to AIS, their consultant-designers kitted out the site's "live-fire ranges with internal ballistic and anti-ricochet finishes, simulation and targetry equipment, and range sound systems," a complete multimedia package that would soon also include HD video projectors and even "laser-based 3D virtual training environments."

Architectural simulations embedded with high-tech, upgradeable media technology thus supply the necessary level of detail for repeating crimes, on demand, like strange social rituals.

[Image: From Gravesend—The Death of Community by Chris Clarke].

The photos seen here were all take by designer and photographer Chris Clarke, whose Flickr set of the series, including a dozen or so further images, is worth a look.

[Image: From Gravesend—The Death of Community by Chris Clarke].

For Clarke, the "facsimile" urbanism of this site at the end of Gravesend is actually something of "a warning—a prophecy of society's potential to alienate itself from itself." He suggests that these surreal scenes threaten to become indistinguishable from everyday life, our cities and streets stripped down to the civic minimum, used as nothing more than bleak stomping grounds for futuristic security forces armed with military-grade tools.

"We have estates, parks, nightclubs, tube stations," Clarke writes, "but is the community missing from Gravesend significantly more present in our inhabited cities and towns?" His own answer remains unspoken but obvious.

[Images: From Gravesend—The Death of Community by Chris Clarke].

Writing about this same site back in 2008, Brian Finoki of Subtopia called it a "new theater of the absurd."

It is, he wrote, "a city standing on the planet for one purpose: to be rioted, hijacked, trashed, held hostage, sacked, and overrun by thousands of chaotic scenarios, only so that it can be reclaimed, retaken, re-propped in circuitous loops of more dazzling proto-militant exercise, stormed by a thousand coordinated boots for eternity, targeted by hundreds of synchronized crosshairs of both lethal and non-lethal weapons."

[Image: From Gravesend—The Death of Community by Chris Clarke].

Check out more photos at Chris Clarke's Flickr page.

(Related: In the Box: A Tour Through the Simulated Battlefields of the U.S. National Training Center).
06 Oct 11:27

Beautiful Chemistry: Amazing Chemical Reactions Filmed with a 4K UltraHD Camera

by Christopher Jobson

Beautiful Chemistry: Amazing Chemical Reactions Filmed with a 4K UltraHD Camera macro chemistry

Beautiful Chemistry: Amazing Chemical Reactions Filmed with a 4K UltraHD Camera macro chemistry

Beautiful Chemistry: Amazing Chemical Reactions Filmed with a 4K UltraHD Camera macro chemistry

Beautiful Chemistry is a new collaboration between Tsinghua University Press and University of Science and Technology of China that seeks to make chemistry more accessible and interesting to the general public. Their first project was the creation of several short films that utilize a 4K UltraHD camera to capture a variety of striking chemical reactions without the usual clutter of test tubes, beakers or lab equipment. I definitely would have paid a bit more attention in chemistry class if we’d had the opportunity to watch some of these. Filmed and edited by Yan Liang.

10 Sep 18:30

Señor Gif - Page 17 - Funny Animated GIFs - Cheezburger

by gatito
patrick

woahh !

03 Oct 21:22

I'm sure this is what parenting will be like. I'm sure of it.

19 Aug 17:12

Designer Marcel Dunger Creates Jewelry by Fusing Colorful Bio-Resin to Pieces of Broken Maple Wood

by Christopher Jobson

Designer Marcel Dunger Creates Jewelry by Fusing Colorful Bio Resin to Pieces of Broken Maple Wood wood resin jewelry fashion

Designer Marcel Dunger Creates Jewelry by Fusing Colorful Bio Resin to Pieces of Broken Maple Wood wood resin jewelry fashion

Designer Marcel Dunger Creates Jewelry by Fusing Colorful Bio Resin to Pieces of Broken Maple Wood wood resin jewelry fashion

Designer Marcel Dunger Creates Jewelry by Fusing Colorful Bio Resin to Pieces of Broken Maple Wood wood resin jewelry fashion

Designer Marcel Dunger Creates Jewelry by Fusing Colorful Bio Resin to Pieces of Broken Maple Wood wood resin jewelry fashion

Designer Marcel Dunger Creates Jewelry by Fusing Colorful Bio Resin to Pieces of Broken Maple Wood wood resin jewelry fashion

Designer Marcel Dunger Creates Jewelry by Fusing Colorful Bio Resin to Pieces of Broken Maple Wood wood resin jewelry fashion

Product designer Marcel Dunger conceived of this fascinating and elegent way of creating small rings, pendants, and earrings by “repairing” broken pieces of maple wood with colored bio-resins. The resin is first poured onto a larger piece of broken wood and after the hardening process the piece is then machined into pieces of jewelry.

We’ve seen so many different projects using resin lately from sculptures of aquatic life to hair ornaments, but what’s probably more interesting, as pointed out by The Fox is Black’s Bobby Solomon, is the trend of visibly incorporating repairs into new or improved objects. We’ve seen it with Japanese Kintsugi pieces, furniture created by fusing tree trunks with cast aluminum, and even another wood/resin combo resulting in glowing kitchen shelves. As far as turning waste products into functional objects, or extending the life of something broken, it’s a visually striking idea that will hopefully be incorporated by more artists and designers. You can see more of Dunger’s work in his online portfolio. (via The Fox is Black, Behance)

Update: Jewelry designer Britta Boeckmann creates a similar form of jewelry and has quite a few pieces available in her shop.

18 Aug 20:34

Men’s Health “How a Bean Becomes a Fart”

by Justin Cone
Giant Ant strikes again for Men’s Health, this time explaining how a bean becomes a gaseous expulsion of malodorous intent (i.e. a fart). Check out their previous project for Men’s Health, “How a Protein Becomes a Muscle.” Credits Client: Men’s Health Magazine Creative Director: Thomas O’Quinn Illustrator: Rami Niemi Directed by Giant Ant Producer: Cory... Read more »
19 Aug 13:34

Sprawling Cardboard Architecture by Nina Lindgren

by Christopher Jobson

Sprawling Cardboard Architecture by Nina Lindgren sculpture cardboard architecture

Sprawling Cardboard Architecture by Nina Lindgren sculpture cardboard architecture

Sprawling Cardboard Architecture by Nina Lindgren sculpture cardboard architecture

Sprawling Cardboard Architecture by Nina Lindgren sculpture cardboard architecture

Sprawling Cardboard Architecture by Nina Lindgren sculpture cardboard architecture

Sprawling Cardboard Architecture by Nina Lindgren sculpture cardboard architecture

Stockholm-based illustrator, printmaker, and artist Nina Lindgren was been working with cardboard to build a series of stacked geometric cityscapes that look like small architectural islands. The works are assembled like puzzles from carefully cut cardboard panels with internal lights for some of the houses. Her most recent piece, “Floating City” was recently on view at ArtRebels Gallery. You can see more over on her website. (via Hi-Fructose)

08 Aug 15:24

Imaginative Industrial Flying Machines Made From Cardboard by Daniel Agdag

by Johnny Strategy

Imaginative Industrial Flying Machines Made From Cardboard by Daniel Agdag sculpture flying flight cardboard

Imaginative Industrial Flying Machines Made From Cardboard by Daniel Agdag sculpture flying flight cardboard

Imaginative Industrial Flying Machines Made From Cardboard by Daniel Agdag sculpture flying flight cardboard

Imaginative Industrial Flying Machines Made From Cardboard by Daniel Agdag sculpture flying flight cardboard

Imaginative Industrial Flying Machines Made From Cardboard by Daniel Agdag sculpture flying flight cardboard

If you want to create detailed and imaginative flying machine sculptures that look like they’re about to take flight, cardboard is hardly the material to use. Unless of course you’re artist Daniel Agdag (previously), who has been toiling away creating a series of new works each more detailed and fascinating than the next. “The Principles of Aerodynamics” is Agdag’s first solo exhibition where his series of cardboard contraptions that portray his “ongoing pursuit of escape through the metaphor of flight” will be on display through Aug 31, 2014.

As he’s done in the past, Agdag forfeits all blueprints, drawings and plans choosing, instead, to work only from mind and scalpel. His industrial beasts–get close and you can almost smell the oil and smoke; hear the clanking and buzzing–come together only from sliced cardboard hinged with glue.

12 Aug 23:25

Photo



13 Aug 17:29

Edible Chocolate LEGOs by Akihiro Mizuuchi

by Christopher Jobson

Edible Chocolate LEGOs by Akihiro Mizuuchi Lego food chocolate

Edible Chocolate LEGOs by Akihiro Mizuuchi Lego food chocolate

Edible Chocolate LEGOs by Akihiro Mizuuchi Lego food chocolate

Edible Chocolate LEGOs by Akihiro Mizuuchi Lego food chocolate

Edible Chocolate LEGOs by Akihiro Mizuuchi Lego food chocolate

Edible Chocolate LEGOs by Akihiro Mizuuchi Lego food chocolate

Edible Chocolate LEGOs by Akihiro Mizuuchi Lego food chocolate

Illustrator and designer Akihiro Mizuuchi designed a modular system for creating edible chocolate LEGO bricks. Chocolate is first poured into precisely designed moulds that after cooling can be popped out and used as regular LEGOs. It’s hard to determine exactly how functional they are, it seems like he had success in building a number of different things, though I can only imagine how quickly they might melt in your hands, but I suppose that’s beside the point; this is two of the greatest things in the world fused together. If you google around there are numerous attempts at creating various forms of LEGO in chocolate or other food, but this appears to be the most detailed and well-designed of anything out there. (via Legosaurus)

24 Mar 06:28

Photo











27 Jul 23:30

Photo



29 Jul 21:02

Photo



30 Jul 14:27

New Conceptual Fine Art Photography from Oleg Oprisco

by Christopher Jobson

New Conceptual Fine Art Photography from Oleg Oprisco surreal portraits conceptual

New Conceptual Fine Art Photography from Oleg Oprisco surreal portraits conceptual

New Conceptual Fine Art Photography from Oleg Oprisco surreal portraits conceptual

New Conceptual Fine Art Photography from Oleg Oprisco surreal portraits conceptual

New Conceptual Fine Art Photography from Oleg Oprisco surreal portraits conceptual

New Conceptual Fine Art Photography from Oleg Oprisco surreal portraits conceptual

New Conceptual Fine Art Photography from Oleg Oprisco surreal portraits conceptual

New Conceptual Fine Art Photography from Oleg Oprisco surreal portraits conceptual

Photographer Oleg Oprisco (previously) who lives and works in Kiev, continues to wow us with his vivid style of conceptual photography that places subjects in the middle of surreal and fantastic tableaus. Oprisco spends large amounts of time scouring flea markets and resale shops to collect props, costumes, and other items for each shot which he often sketches beforehand in a sketchbook, with the final shoot requiring 2-3 days of preparation. I love this bit from an interview with 500px earlier this year where he was asked to give advice to amateur/student photographers:

I strongly advise to use your time wisely. Laziness is your worst enemy. Enough looking at photographs taken by your idols. You’ve commented on enough work that you hate. It’s time to take photos. Your best photos. Let go and shoot, shoot, shoot!

All of Oprisco’s work is available as prints which you can inquire about directly. You can see more of his recent work on Flickr and Facebook. (via 500px)

16 Jul 15:13

Collector’s Space Shuttle Screenprints! I’ll be debuting 3 new...







Collector’s Space Shuttle Screenprints!

I’ll be debuting 3 new screenprints at Comic Con next week commemorating the amazing Space Shuttle program which spanned 30 years! These will be available indivudually or as a set. Each one is 10”x28”.

Come visit me and my friends Jasmin Lai and Tiffany Ford at Booth #5007!

23 Jul 18:56

Michela Picchi

by Dave

Michela Picchi on grainedit.com

Beautiful illustration work from Berlin-based designer Michela Picchi.

 

 

Michela Picchi on grainedit.com

Michela Picchi on grainedit.com

Michela Picchi on grainedit.com

 

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Tom haugomat

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14 Jul 17:14

Scène de vie ordinaire chez les cosplayers

(Source)

24 Mar 16:17

30 Day Challenge // Day 24 // Something That Represents Your...



30 Day Challenge // Day 24 // Something That Represents Your Favorite Culture

I’m Buddhist and I’ve always loved the imagery even before I was. The wrathful deities from Tibetan and Mahayana art always fascinated me as a kid. They were like transformations the gods took on in battle. Like a monster magical girl I guess. His is name is Mahakala. Power Prism Make Up.

10 Mar 15:27

30 Day Challenge // Day 23 // Something That Makes You Happy...







30 Day Challenge // Day 23 // Something That Makes You Happy

I’ve learned how to cook since I moved out to California. It’s therapeutic. And delicious~ I garnish everything with a fried egg, and I never regret it.

14 Jul 09:10

woutervandevoorde: Hume Sunrise

14 Jul 16:54

J. Vergara

by antbaena
07 Jul 18:36

"Il récolte plus de 6.000 dollars sur Kickstarter pour préparer une salade de pommes de terre"

“Il récolte plus de 6.000 dollars sur Kickstarter pour préparer une salade de pommes de terre”

- 20Minutes (à cause de beldorin)
08 Jul 08:05

Patrick Joust

08 Jul 17:19

Stop-Motion Animation Reveals the Insides of Objects Sanded Down Layer by Layer

by Christopher Jobson

Stop Motion Animation Reveals the Insides of Objects Sanded Down Layer by Layer video art stop motion animation

Stop Motion Animation Reveals the Insides of Objects Sanded Down Layer by Layer video art stop motion animation

Stop Motion Animation Reveals the Insides of Objects Sanded Down Layer by Layer video art stop motion animation

As a quick follow-up to our video from Keith Skretch yesterday, here’s a similar concept from two years ago by Laurin Döpfner who used an industrial sander to grind down logs, electronics, and even a skull in thin layers which he then photographed to create this amazing stop motion video. Each object is comprised of about 100 different photos, a process I can only image was extremely labor intensive.

This will be trending on /r/ThingsCutInHalfPorn/ by the end of the day if it hasn’t already. While you’re at it see also @HalfPics, and for the not so faint of heart there’s the Visible Human Project. (via Jason Sondhi)

09 Jul 13:46

Shane Walsh - From the series Shipwreck Paintings (2010)



Shane Walsh - From the series Shipwreck Paintings (2010)

07 Jul 14:08

Are Ad Agencies Still Cool?


(Back in 2011, one of the largest ad agencies in the world flew this banner over the hoards at the Cannes ad festival. Note the spelling of "famously".)
Short answer: No. Long answer: FUCK No.

Today’s ad agencies are nothing like Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce in the 1960s. They’re not even like Crispin Porter + Bogusky in 2005.

If you’re a young creative, you’re not going to be Don Draper or Peggy Olson or even Stan Rizzo. You’re definitely not going to be Alex Bogusky.

You have no new truly original ideas in your portfolio. You’re lucky if you have even one mildly interesting idea amongst all the hackneyed, derivative dogshit. I know this: I’ve seen your portfolio. 100 fucking times.

Ad students have been sending me their portfolios—nearly daily, unsolicited—for 8 years, asking for advice. I never write them back.

This is my mass response.

If you want a “cool” ad agency creative department job, it’s there, waiting for you (at least at the big mega-merged bloated shops) if you happen to be one of those few young creatives with one (better, two) of those mildly interesting ideas in your portfolio. Because agencies these days are as desperate as a virgin male 2nd semester college senior.

Last fall, freelance designer Murat Mutlu wrote a 2,100 word article, republished to a wide audience on Creative Review, titled: "Why talented creatives are leaving your agency."

If you work at an ad agency, worked at an ad agency, or especially, if you're planning on working at an ad agency: read it. It is well worth your time.

This trend of good copywriters, art directors, and designers bolting or eschewing established ad agencies is not a new one. AdAge published a piece about it back in 2010. But, it is a trend that is gaining momentum, exponentially. Established creatives are heading to social start-ups and media websites. More and more brands are hiring these disgruntled creatives and bringing their ad work in-house.

Meanwhile, as Mutlu says:

"Agencies...are happy to keep trying to live in a world which is ceasing to exist. Clinging onto the same ideas, tools, and ways of working with CEOs who are either oblivious to the current mindset or too frightened to instigate change. It's the perfect storm of increasing entrepreneurialism, decreasing loyalty and an industry reveling in mediocrity."

Of course, all the creative directors at all of ad agencies of all sizes will still use the "C" (creative) and "I" (innovative) words in your interview. If you're a "hotshot" who they're hot to hire and you've got a good feeling about the place, tell them you'd like to freelance for a couple of months first. Facades are easy to erect.

Unless you have inside info, it’s hard to tell how “creative” an ad agency’s work environment is. One clue is to look at is the agency’s own self-promo stuff.

I've gathered together some recent agency self-promo and recruitment ads/videos/staff press photos—instances where ad agencies try to show the world just how fucking cool they really are.



Take a look, and see if these seem like the kind of places you'd like to spend working 10, 12 (or more, depending on the shop) hours a day.



The Ungar Group: "No Regrets"



Chicago's Ungar Group aired this spot, locally, during an April episode of last season's Mad Men.


Copy: "If you're looking for an advertising agency and don't meet with The Ungar Group. you will regret it for the rest of your lives."

Why is the man a zombie? I think they were trying to reference the Walking Dead (also on AMC). Why would you give your money to this ad agency? Because you're fucking brain dead. Back in 2007, Ungar created another cracking self-promo video where they threatened a kitten with a .357 Magnum.

SapientNitro "Idea Engineers"


SapientNitro has 37 offices worldwide, and is considered a "hot" "edgy" digital ad agency. What happened here with this auto-tuned "rap" song, I'm educatedly guessing, is one of the upper management guys desperately wanted to show off his guitar "skills".

"We're thinking not sinking..." Idea Engineers...


Planet Earth deserves to be destroyed by the Volgons because of this video.

DigitasLBi: "Inheritance"


This is the shop where every young "digital" creative wants to work. Their logo is a unicorn.

From the press note about the ad:

"...we're firm believers in practicing what we preach. And what we preach is that creating content that intrigues, engages and even entertains is a much better way of getting noticed than slavishly manufacturing marketing messages. We also believe in being brave (how quaint) and giving new things a try...Inheritance isn't about who we are, what we do or even what we think about the world. It is however meant to be so very us (what?)."

I'm disappointed they didn't slip "storytelling" in there somewhere.


Do you want your two minutes back? Write them, and ask them to get their magical fucking unicorn to make it happen.

How bout some print promo ads.

"JWT Brazil. 76 years (old), so what?"

(sigh)

TBWA Poland.

WHERE IDEAS ARE BORN. SEE, BECAUSE, A "LIGHT BULB" IS THE UNIVERSAL SYMBOL FOR "IDEA". Bloody brilliant.

Now, some staff press photos (click for closer looks).

Press photos from two firms considered "hot" and "creative". L—El Segundo's David & Goliath. GET IT? R—NYC's Sagmeister & Walsh. They're wearing space helmets because they're "explorers". They're naked because they're morons.

 

Both Philadelphia's Red Tettemer & Partners (L) and BBH NYC (R) go the hadouken route. WHO HAD IT FIRST?

(agency promo photos via Business Insider)
__________

In conclusion: stop sending me your portfolios, and drop out of ad school.

05 Jul 10:56

Flea

by michaeldeforge


22 Jun 01:32

captain toad