Shared posts

03 Apr 00:29

Japanese Fart Scrolls

by noreply@blogger.com (P-E Fronning)
06 Apr 20:32

chubbytown: The Tiny Tiddlers by Jack. I’ve started...



chubbytown:

The Tiny Tiddlers by Jack.

I’ve started making Chubby comics

10 Mar 11:26

Les affiches de Boris Vallejo

Boris Vallejo, c'est le mec qui a développé l'esthétique des affiches des films d'heroic fantasy, identifiables parmi toutes. Composition pyramidale, hyperréalisme, avec un certain sens de l'épique et du corps "bien fait". Il a bossé pour des films aussi cultes que Barbarella, des comédies grand public comme le génial National Lampoon Vacations de feu Harold Ramis et plus récemment Rubber de Quentin Dupieux.

 

(Source)

11 Mar 18:30

Mulder & Scully

Série de polaroids de Gillian Anderson et David Duchovny sur le tournage de The X-Files.

 

03 Mar 18:25

Edgar Bak

by Dave

Edgar Bak via http://grainedit.com

Edgar Bak is a talented designer based out of Poland. A graduate of the Academy of Fine Arts in Warsaw, he can now be found art directing for various magazines and teaching typography and information architecture classes at the School of Form in Poznan. He was also a driving force behind Projekt: The Polish journal of visual art and design published by United Editions.

Edgar Bak via http://grainedit.com

Edgar Bak via http://grainedit.com

Edgar Bak via http://grainedit.com

 

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Also worth viewing:
Peak 21
Polish Book Covers
Polish Arts and Crafts Store Bag

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28 Feb 08:46

10 moments d'histoire bizarres


Anie Edison Taylor, la première personne a avoir descendu les chutes du Niagara en tonneau et survécu (1901).


Test de nouveaux gilets pare-balles (1923).


Des mannequins en maillot de bain lors d'un défilé (1923).


"Cage bébé" destinée à donner air et espace aux nouveaux-nés dans les appartements (Californie, 1937).

De l'alcool est déversé par les fenêtres durant la Prohibition à Détroit (1929).


Un distributeur automatique d'auto-bronzant (1949).


Une mère et son fils regarde un essai nucléaire (Las Vegas, 1953).



Ronald McDonald en 1963.



Un directeur d'hôtel verse de l'acide dans une piscine pour en chasser des Noirs (Californie, 1964).


Le premier jour de traffic en Suède après la décision de conduire à droite et non plus à gauche (1967).

(source)

23 Feb 19:05

Roentgen Objects, or: Devices Larger than the Rooms that Contain Them

by Geoff Manaugh
[Image: Photo courtesy of the Rijksmuseum Amsterdam and the Metropolitan Museum of Art].

An extraordinary exhibition closed at the Metropolitan Museum of Art a few weeks ago, featuring mechanical furniture designed by the father and son team of Abraham and David Roentgen: elaborate 18th-century technical devices disguised as desks and tables.

First, a quick bit of historical framing, courtesy of the Museum itself: "The meteoric rise of the workshop of Abraham Roentgen (1711–1793) and his son David (1743–1807) blazed across eighteenth-century continental Europe. From about 1742 to its closing in the early 1800s, the Roentgens' innovative designs were combined with intriguing mechanical devices to revolutionize traditional French and English furniture types."

Each piece, the Museum adds, was as much "an ingenious technical invention" as it was "a magnificent work of art," an "elaborate mechanism" or series of "complicated mechanical devices" that sat waiting inside palaces and parlors for someone to come along and activate them.

If you can get past the visual styling of the furniture—after all, the dainty little details and inlays perhaps might not appeal to many BLDGBLOG readers—and concentrate instead only on the mechanical aspect of these designs, then there is something really incredible to be seen here.

[Image: Photo courtesy of the Rijksmuseum Amsterdam and the Metropolitan Museum of Art].

Hidden amidst drawers and sliding panels are keyholes, the proper turning of which results in other unseen drawers and deeper cabinets popping open, swinging out to reveal previously undetectable interiors.

But it doesn't stop there. Further surfaces split in half to reveal yet more trays, files, and shelves that unlatch, swivel, and slide aside to expose entire other cantilevered parts of the furniture, materializing as if from nowhere on little rails and hinges.

Whole cubic feet of interior space are revealed in a flash of clacking wood flung forth on tracks and pulleys.



As the Museum phrases it, Abraham Roentgen's "mechanical ingenuity" was "exemplified by the workings of the lower section" of one of the desks on display in the show: "when the key of the lower drawer is turned to the right, the side drawers spring open; if a button is pressed on the underside of these drawers, each swings aside to reveal three other drawers."

And thus the sequence continues in bursts of self-expansion more reminiscent of a garden than a work of carpentry, a room full of wooden roses blooming in slow motion.

[Images: Photos courtesy of the Rijksmuseum Amsterdam and the Metropolitan Museum of Art].

The furniture is a process—an event—a seemingly endless sequence of new spatial conditions and states expanding outward into the room around it.

Each piece is a controlled explosion of carpentry with no real purpose other than to test the limits of volumetric self-demonstration, offering little in the way of useful storage space and simply showing off, performing, a spatial Olympics of shelves within shelves and spaces hiding spaces.

Sufficiently voluminous furniture becomes indistinguishable from a dream.

[Image: Photo courtesy of the Rijksmuseum Amsterdam and the Metropolitan Museum of Art].

What was so fascinating about the exhibition—and this can be seen, for example, in some of the short accompanying videos (a few of which are archived on the Metropolitan Museum of Art's website)—is that you always seemed to have reached the final state, the fullest possible unfolding of the furniture, only for some other little keyhole to appear or some latch to be depressed in just the right way, and the thing just keeps on going, promising infinite possible expansions, as if a single piece of furniture could pop open into endless sub-spaces that are eventually larger than the room it is stored within.

The idea of furniture larger than the space that houses it is an extraordinary topological paradox, a spatial limit-case like black holes or event horizons, a state to which all furniture makers could—and should—aspire, devising a Roentgen object of infinite volumetric density.

A single desk that, when unfolded, is larger than the building around it, hiding its own internal rooms and corridors.

Suggesting that they, too, were thrilled by the other-worldly possibilities of their furniture, the Roentgens—and I love this so much!—also decorated their pieces with perspectival illusions.

[Image: Photo courtesy of the Rijksmuseum Amsterdam and the Metropolitan Museum of Art].

The top of a table might include, for example, the accurately rendered, gridded space of a drawing room, as if you were peering, almost cinematically, into a building located elsewhere; meanwhile, pop-up panels might include a checkerboard reference to other possible spaces that thus seemed to exist somewhere within or behind the furniture, lending each piece the feel of a portal or visual gateway into vast and multidimensional mansions tucked away inside.

The giddiness of it all—at least for me—was the implication that you could decorate a house with pieces of furniture; however, when unfolded to their maximum possible extent, these same objects might volumetrically increase the internal surface area of that house several times over, doubling, tripling, quadrupling its available volume. But it's not magic or the supernatural—it's not quadraturin—it's just advanced carpentry, using millimeter-precise joinery and a constellation of unseen hinges.

[Images: Photos courtesy of the Rijksmuseum Amsterdam and the Metropolitan Museum of Art].

You could imagine, for example, a new type of house; it's got a central service core lined with small elevators. Wooden boxes, perhaps four feet cubed, pass up and down inside the walls of the house, riding this network of dumbwaiters from floor to floor, where they occasionally stop, when a resident demands it. That resident then pops open the elevator door and begins to unfold the box inside, unlatching and expanding it outward into the room, this Roentgen object full of doors, drawers, and shelves, cantilevered panels, tabletops, and dividers.

And thus the elevators grow, simultaneously inside and outside, a liminal cabinetry both tumescent and architectural that fills up the space with spaces of its own, fractal super-furniture stretching through more than one room at a time and containing its own further rooms deep within it.

But then you reverse the process and go back through it all the other direction, painstakingly shutting panels, locking drawers, pushing small boxes inside of larger boxes, and tucking it all up again, compressing it like a JPG back into the original, ultra-dense cube it all came from. You're like some homebound god of superstrings tying up and hiding part of the universe so that others might someday rediscover it.

To have been around to drink coffee with the Roentgens and to discuss the delirious outer limits of furniture design would have been like talking to a family of cosmologists, diving deep into the quantum joinery of spatially impossible objects, something so far outside of mere cabinetry and woodwork that it almost forms a new class of industrial design. Alas, their workshop closed, their surviving objects today are limited in number, and the exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art is now closed.
11 Feb 19:38

Vitra Map Table.

by noreply@blogger.com (Celyn)

Animated film for Barber Osgerby & Vitra. A time-lapse extravaganza in glorious 2D.  

Below is the link for more photos from the production: http://www.flickr.com/photos/39988192@N02/sets/72157640833106484/




 Below is the early development work. I started the designs over 2 years ago. Originally I based the concept on a children's book. The intended age group was young adults and children.  

 



14 Feb 16:21

The Creators Project did an in-depth interview with me and David...





The Creators Project did an in-depth interview with me and David O’Reilly about the development and production of our video games for “Her”! You can read it here.

Above are two of my concept paintings for the “Perfect Mom” game!

24 Feb 14:16

Women of the Stage #16

by Testify
'Coming in Person Feb 24'

18 Feb 16:29

A vos agendas

20 Feb 15:48

"Des proxénètes se battent à l’arbalète dans le bois de Boulogne"

“Des proxénètes se battent à l’arbalète dans le bois de Boulogne”

- Direct Matin (à cause de Quite et Bouille)
02 Feb 16:40

Jay-Z 1988, London.



Jay-Z 1988, London.

11 Feb 18:19

Attaque vicieuse

(Source)

11 Feb 10:57

Behind the Scenes #43

by Testify
Harrison Ford relaxes on The Millenium Falcon during a break in shooting The Empire Strikes Back

10 Feb 13:50

Ingenious Door Opens and Closes Like Folded Paper

by Christopher Jobson

Ingenious Door Opens and Closes Like Folded Paper kinetic doors

Ingenious Door Opens and Closes Like Folded Paper kinetic doors

Ingenious Door Opens and Closes Like Folded Paper kinetic doors

Like the design of functional objects such as chairs or tables, it would seem new ideas for the humble door would be completely exhausted, and then along comes Austrian artist Klemens Torggler. This 4-panel entryway called the Evolution Door opens and closes in a surprisingly elegant way at the slightest touch, folding in on itself like pieces of paper. Torggler calls this system a “flip panel door” (Drehplattentür), and it’s almost more of a kinetic sculpture than functional door, but I would be happy to have one in every room of my house. And for those of you who envision a crushed finger or hands, he’s already solved that problem.

Currently the door is meant as a prototype, an extension of his artistic practice where Vienna-based Torggler has been creating similar kinetic doors for many years, several of which are available through Artelier Contemporary. (via hajohinta, nsfw)

07 Feb 18:47

The King #10

by Testify

07 Feb 15:19

Giant Inflatable Balloons Transform Interior Spaces into Otherwordly Environments

by Christopher Jobson

Giant Inflatable Balloons Transform Interior Spaces into Otherwordly Environments installation architecture
El Claustro, 2011. Querétaro, México. 10 x 10 x 11m

Giant Inflatable Balloons Transform Interior Spaces into Otherwordly Environments installation architecture
El Claustro, 2011. Querétaro, México. 10 x 10 x 11m

Giant Inflatable Balloons Transform Interior Spaces into Otherwordly Environments installation architecture
El Claustro, 2011. Querétaro, México. 10 x 10 x 11m

Giant Inflatable Balloons Transform Interior Spaces into Otherwordly Environments installation architecture
El Claustro, 2011. Querétaro, México. 10 x 10 x 11m

Giant Inflatable Balloons Transform Interior Spaces into Otherwordly Environments installation architecture
El Claustro, 2011. Querétaro, México. 10 x 10 x 11m

Giant Inflatable Balloons Transform Interior Spaces into Otherwordly Environments installation architecture
La Capella, 2009. Piera, Spain. 5.5 x 6 x 15m.

Giant Inflatable Balloons Transform Interior Spaces into Otherwordly Environments installation architecture
El Sótano de la Tabacalera, 2011. Madrid, Spain. 13 x 15 x 7m.

Giant Inflatable Balloons Transform Interior Spaces into Otherwordly Environments installation architecture
Sala Buit, 2011. Barcelona, Spain. 12.5 x 5 x 2.5m.

Giant Inflatable Balloons Transform Interior Spaces into Otherwordly Environments installation architecture
Palazzo Ducale, 2011. Genova, Italy.
15.5 x 12 x 4m

Giant Inflatable Balloons Transform Interior Spaces into Otherwordly Environments installation architecture
Espaço 180, 2013. Lisbon, Portugal. 18 x 15 x 8m.

Giant Inflatable Balloons Transform Interior Spaces into Otherwordly Environments installation architecture
Cerveira Creative Camp, 2012. Vilanova de Cerveira, Portugal. 13.2 x 9.5 x 7.7m.

Barcelona-based Penique Productions is an artist collective founded in 2007 that creates transformative installations in public spaces. To do this the group utilizes massive plastic balloons that are inflated inside buildings and other interior areas. Coupled with exterior lighting that illuminates the colored plastic, the results can be beautifully dramatic, making the new environment almost unrecognizable from the actual space.

You can see many more views of several installations on their website, and almost all of them are accompanied by videos that document the process. Penrique has upcoming projects next month at both the UB University in Barcelona, and at Galeria N2.

06 Feb 02:16

Marilyn in Action #87

by WillyC

Marilyn dances (with Truman Capote)
22 Jan 19:33

Listen to Noel Gallagher Piss on Every Music Video Oasis Made

by Reverend Justito

It was Rage Against the Machine who famously screamed the friendly reminder that your anger is a gift. Thankfully for all of us, Noel Gallagher uses that gift and makes us all laugh.

noel gallagher

This time out, the former Oasis guitarist is sharing his deep hate of the music video process as some clever bloke across the pond has spliced together the best moments from the Time Flies compilation. Enjoy below as Gallagher shares about everything from being drunker than his brother Liam to sharing that helicopters cost “a fucking fortune.”

Let’s hope 2014 is the year we get another solo album from Noel and his High Flying Birds.

24 Jan 13:36

kimiaki yaegashi

24 Jan 20:16

Transistors

by CH2P
Source: Tout L’univers
(Le Livre de Paris 1958-1975)
adaptation italienne
Illustrateur: inconnu
26 Jan 20:45

Amplificateurs à circuit intégré

by CH2P
Source: Tout L’univers
(Le Livre de Paris 1958-1975)
adaptation italienne
Illustrateur: inconnu

21 Jan 20:08

A 1:60-Scale Boeing 777 Built Entirely from Paper Manilla Folders by Luca Iaconi-Stewart

by Christopher Jobson

A 1:60 Scale Boeing 777 Built Entirely from Paper Manilla Folders by Luca Iaconi Stewart sculpture paper models flight airplanes

A 1:60 Scale Boeing 777 Built Entirely from Paper Manilla Folders by Luca Iaconi Stewart sculpture paper models flight airplanes

A 1:60 Scale Boeing 777 Built Entirely from Paper Manilla Folders by Luca Iaconi Stewart sculpture paper models flight airplanes

A 1:60 Scale Boeing 777 Built Entirely from Paper Manilla Folders by Luca Iaconi Stewart sculpture paper models flight airplanes

A 1:60 Scale Boeing 777 Built Entirely from Paper Manilla Folders by Luca Iaconi Stewart sculpture paper models flight airplanes

A 1:60 Scale Boeing 777 Built Entirely from Paper Manilla Folders by Luca Iaconi Stewart sculpture paper models flight airplanes

A 1:60 Scale Boeing 777 Built Entirely from Paper Manilla Folders by Luca Iaconi Stewart sculpture paper models flight airplanes

A 1:60 Scale Boeing 777 Built Entirely from Paper Manilla Folders by Luca Iaconi Stewart sculpture paper models flight airplanes

A 1:60 Scale Boeing 777 Built Entirely from Paper Manilla Folders by Luca Iaconi Stewart sculpture paper models flight airplanes

A 1:60 Scale Boeing 777 Built Entirely from Paper Manilla Folders by Luca Iaconi Stewart sculpture paper models flight airplanes

A 1:60 Scale Boeing 777 Built Entirely from Paper Manilla Folders by Luca Iaconi Stewart sculpture paper models flight airplanes

Inspired by high school architecture class where he was assigned to create simple paper models using cut paper manilla folders, San Francisco-based designer Luca Iaconi-Stewart went home to begin construction on an extremely ambitious project: a 1:60 scale reproduction of a Boeing 777 using some of the techniques he learned in class. That was in 2008, when Iaconi-Stewart was just a junior in high school.

Unbelievably, the project continues five years later as he works on and off to perfect every aspect of the plane. Relying on detailed schematics of an Air India 777-300ER he found online, he recreates the digital drawings in Adobe Illustrator and then prints them directly onto the paper manilla folders. But everything has to be perfect. So perfect, that Iaconi-Stewart says he’s actually built two airplanes, the one you see here and the numerous failed attempts including three tails, two entire sets of wings, and multiple experiments to ensure everything is just so.

The paper plane-making wunderkind hopes to finally wrap up the project this summer and isn’t quite sure what will happen next, but thinks an even larger 20-foot model could be an interesting next step. So far there are no plans for the completed model to go anywhere, but it would look great in an aeronautical museum or in the lobby of a certain aircraft manufacturer’s lobby. Just some suggestions. All photos courtesy Luca Iaconi-Stewart. (via Wired)

22 Jan 14:22

Les Graphiquants

by Dave

Les Graphiquants via #grainedit

Established in 2008, Les Graphiquants is a design studio based in Paris, France. With a portfolio that is ripe in typographic exploration, they create work that is highly expressive and uncompromising in it’s approach.

 

Les Graphiquants via #grainedit

 

Les Graphiquants via #grainedit

Les Graphiquants via #grainedit

Les Graphiquants via #grainedit

Les Graphiquants via #grainedit

Les Graphiquants via #grainedit

Les Graphiquants via #grainedit

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Also worth viewing…
Type and Media 2012
Travis Stearns
YWFT Fonts

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Thanks to Mister Retro: Machine Wash Deluxe for being this week's sponsor.






20 Jan 21:55

Emptied Gestures: Physical Movement Translated into Symmetrical Charcoal Drawings by Heather Hansen

by Christopher Jobson

Emptied Gestures: Physical Movement Translated into Symmetrical Charcoal Drawings by Heather Hansen performance kinetc drawing dance
Photo by Bryan Tarnowski

Emptied Gestures: Physical Movement Translated into Symmetrical Charcoal Drawings by Heather Hansen performance kinetc drawing dance
Photo by Bryan Tarnowski

Emptied Gestures: Physical Movement Translated into Symmetrical Charcoal Drawings by Heather Hansen performance kinetc drawing dance
Photo by Bryan Tarnowski

Emptied Gestures: Physical Movement Translated into Symmetrical Charcoal Drawings by Heather Hansen performance kinetc drawing dance
Photo by Bryan Tarnowski

Emptied Gestures: Physical Movement Translated into Symmetrical Charcoal Drawings by Heather Hansen performance kinetc drawing dance
Photo by Bryan Tarnowski

Emptied Gestures: Physical Movement Translated into Symmetrical Charcoal Drawings by Heather Hansen performance kinetc drawing dance
Photo by Bryan Tarnowski

Emptied Gestures: Physical Movement Translated into Symmetrical Charcoal Drawings by Heather Hansen performance kinetc drawing dance
Photo by Bryan Tarnowski

Emptied Gestures: Physical Movement Translated into Symmetrical Charcoal Drawings by Heather Hansen performance kinetc drawing dance
Photo by Bryan Tarnowski

Emptied Gestures: Physical Movement Translated into Symmetrical Charcoal Drawings by Heather Hansen performance kinetc drawing dance
Photo by Spencer Hansen at Ochi Gallery

Emptied Gestures: Physical Movement Translated into Symmetrical Charcoal Drawings by Heather Hansen performance kinetc drawing dance
Photo by Spencer Hansen at Ochi Gallery

Emptied Gestures: Physical Movement Translated into Symmetrical Charcoal Drawings by Heather Hansen performance kinetc drawing dance
Photo by Spencer Hansen at Ochi Gallery

Emptied Gestures: Physical Movement Translated into Symmetrical Charcoal Drawings by Heather Hansen performance kinetc drawing dance
Photo by Spencer Hansen at Ochi Gallery

Splayed across a giant paper canvas with pieces of charcoal firmly grasped in each hand, Heather Hansen begins a grueling physical routine atop a sizeable paper canvas. Her body contorts into carefully choreographed gestures as her writing implements grate across the floor, the long trails resulting in a permanent recording of her physical movements. Part dance and part performance art, the kinetic drawings are a way for Hansen to merge her love for visual art and dance into a unified artform. The final symmetrical patterns that emerge in each pieces are reminiscent of a Rorschach test, or perhaps cycles found in nature.

Hansen most recently had a group exhibition, The Value of a Line, at Ochi Gallery in Ketchum, Idaho which runs through March 31, 2014. All photography above courtesy the artist by Spencer Hansen and Bryan Tarnowski. If you liked this also check out the work of Tony Orrico. (via iGNANT, My Modern Met)

17 Jan 13:11

They Were Collaborators #865

by WillyC

Debbie Harry and Andy Warhol
17 Jan 15:26

Architectural Renderings of Life Drawn with Pencil and Pen by Rafael Araujo

by Christopher Jobson

Architectural Renderings of Life Drawn with Pencil and Pen by Rafael Araujo drawing butterflies architecture 3d

Architectural Renderings of Life Drawn with Pencil and Pen by Rafael Araujo drawing butterflies architecture 3d
Nautilus

Architectural Renderings of Life Drawn with Pencil and Pen by Rafael Araujo drawing butterflies architecture 3d
Caracol

Architectural Renderings of Life Drawn with Pencil and Pen by Rafael Araujo drawing butterflies architecture 3d
Double Conic Spiral, process

Architectural Renderings of Life Drawn with Pencil and Pen by Rafael Araujo drawing butterflies architecture 3d
Double Conic Spiral. Ink, acrylic/canvas.

Architectural Renderings of Life Drawn with Pencil and Pen by Rafael Araujo drawing butterflies architecture 3d

Architectural Renderings of Life Drawn with Pencil and Pen by Rafael Araujo drawing butterflies architecture 3d
Morpho

Architectural Renderings of Life Drawn with Pencil and Pen by Rafael Araujo drawing butterflies architecture 3d

Architectural Renderings of Life Drawn with Pencil and Pen by Rafael Araujo drawing butterflies architecture 3d
Calculation (Sequence) #2. Acrylic, china ink/canvas.

Architectural Renderings of Life Drawn with Pencil and Pen by Rafael Araujo drawing butterflies architecture 3d

Architectural Renderings of Life Drawn with Pencil and Pen by Rafael Araujo drawing butterflies architecture 3d

Architectural Renderings of Life Drawn with Pencil and Pen by Rafael Araujo drawing butterflies architecture 3d

In the midst of our daily binge of emailing, Tweeting, Facebooking, app downloading and photoshopping it’s almost hard to imagine how anything was done without the help of a computer. For Venezuelan artist Rafael Araujo, it’s a time he relishes. At a technology-free drafting table he deftly renders the motion and subtle mathematical brilliance of nature with a pencil, ruler and protractor. Araujo creates complex fields of three dimensional space where butterflies take flight and the logarithmic spirals of shells swirl into existence. He calls the series of work Calculation, and many of his drawings seem to channel the look and feel of illustrations found in Da Vinci’s sketchbooks. In an age when 3D programs can render a digital version of something like this in just minutes, it makes you appreciate Araujo’s remarkable skill. You can see much more here. (via ArchitectureAtlas)

18 Jan 14:55

A Maldives Beach Awash in Bioluminescent Phytoplankton Looks Like an Ocean of Stars

by Christopher Jobson

A Maldives Beach Awash in Bioluminescent Phytoplankton Looks Like an Ocean of Stars nature Maldives light beach

A Maldives Beach Awash in Bioluminescent Phytoplankton Looks Like an Ocean of Stars nature Maldives light beach

A Maldives Beach Awash in Bioluminescent Phytoplankton Looks Like an Ocean of Stars nature Maldives light beach

A Maldives Beach Awash in Bioluminescent Phytoplankton Looks Like an Ocean of Stars nature Maldives light beach

A Maldives Beach Awash in Bioluminescent Phytoplankton Looks Like an Ocean of Stars nature Maldives light beach

A Maldives Beach Awash in Bioluminescent Phytoplankton Looks Like an Ocean of Stars nature Maldives light beach

While vacationing on the Maldives Islands, Taiwanese photographer Will Ho stumbled onto an incredible stretch of beach covered in millions of bioluminescent phytoplankton. These tiny organisms glow similarly to fireflies and tend to emit light when stressed, such as when waves crash or when they are otherwise agitated. While the phenomenon and its chemical mechanisms have been known for some time, biologists have only recently began to understand the reasons behind it. You can see a few more of Ho’s photographs over on Flickr.

17 Jan 19:21

expedition