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26 Nov 18:05

First of the last Space Shuttle launches - The Big Picture - Boston.com

by pocra
18 Nov 02:41

People Blocks 2

by andy

PB2_GROUP_1

PB2_PIERRE_BOX

PB2_JACQUES_1

PB2_MIX_2

PB2_GROUP2

PB2_MIX_1

PB2_LUC_BOX

People Blocks 2 is a limited edition artist sculpture series.
Designed by Andy Rementer and produced by Case Studyo.

Available at casestudyo.com

Watch the teaser animation

16 Nov 04:55

rocketslime: nubbsgalore: photos by lassi rautiainen, susan...


lassi rautiainen


lassi rautiainen


staffan widstrand


staffan widstrand


lassi rautiainen


susan brookes


lassi rautiainen

rocketslime:

nubbsgalore:

photos by lassi rautiainen, susan brookes and staffan widstrand of a rare friendship that developed between a female grey wolf and a male brown bear in northern finland.

notes lassi, “no one can know exactly why or how the young wolf and bear became friends, but i think that perhaps they were both alone when they were young and a bit unsure of how to survive alone. it seems to me that they feel safe being together.”

the photographers also note that the two share every meal together, bringing each other their kills (as seen in the third and fifth photos).

earbackwards armlessbear
13 Nov 17:41

same same but different, hi-mi-zu: Yamikin Ushijima-kun

by joenagle
13 Nov 17:42

MAGNETIC

by comkee
13 Nov 17:42

OTAKU GANGSTA

by researchinstitute
14 Oct 20:43

Some Herb

by noreply@blogger.com (Jaypeg)
UandLC-01

Upper & Lowercase magazine
Art director: Herb Lubalin

This website is a brilliant resource where you can download entire issues.

http://blog.fonts.com/category/u&lc/

It's a great magazine. Even the simple text pages are elegant.

Upper & Lowercase
Upper & Lowercase
Upper & Lowercase
12 Nov 00:16

Photo



12 Nov 13:04

If one could know whether among that glittering host there were here and there other spirit-inhabited grains of rock and metal, whether man’s blundering search for wisdom and for love was a sole and insignificant tremor, or part of a universal movement!

by but does it float
Photos of the comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko by the Rosetta spacecraft Title: Olaf Stapledon, Star Maker Also: The Singing Comet Folkert
12 Nov 18:13

Amongst the Machines: A Visit to the Tesla Factory

by Geoff Manaugh
[Image: Outside the Tesla factory; Instagram by BLDGBLOG].

The coolest thing about a tour of the Tesla factory out in Fremont, California, is the huge metal-stamping machine—a behemoth piece of equipment that applies more than five thousand tons of pressure in order to mold metal parts in an instant. In fact, it was not even the company's largest stamping machine, which was offline the afternoon I went through.

You hear this thing long before you see it: a thundering and resonant split-second blast that sounds more like a minor-key chord being sledgehammered out into the cavernous factory. Then the machine cycle repeats itself: parts are removed, dragged, and rattled into place, followed by the preliminary crash of a new metal sheet being lowered into the bay. Then bam, that weird sound again, equal parts dark ambient soundscape and sci-fi howl.

Strangely, though, there is an air of melancholy to the sound—a kind of unexpected pathos—as if the machine had accidentally been tuned to some minor and wistful harmonic. The instantaneous hydraulic detonation of what sounds like an organ chord thus rings out, augmented by the foot-shuddering bass of the stamp itself, which sends small earthquakes rolling through the floor. (In fact, this reminded me that the factory is more or less directly above the Hayward Fault and I began to wonder what seismic effects such a colossal machine might actually be having.)

The machine only got louder and louder as we wound our way through a complicated back-turning maze of welding walls and robot arms. Finally visible, it seemed to be made entirely of gates: a giant red portal through which shaped metal could pass.

[Image: The red gates of metal-stamping machine; photo courtesy of Tesla].

As we stopped to watch, the slow rhythm of its sounds matched up with processional movements now visible deep inside the cathedral-sized device, and the overall process began to make more sense.

Two men in full ear protection stood there, silhouetted against the mouth of the machine, presumably hypnotized by its otherworldly, repetitive soundtrack—or maybe that was just me, perhaps overly willing to hear, in the looped noise of this exotic machine, music that wasn't really there.

In any case, I was on the tour as part of a workshop run last week at the UC Berkeley College of Environmental Design, with students from Nicholas de Monchaux's course at Berkeley and a small group visiting from Smout Allen's & Kyle Buchanan's Unit 11 over at the Bartlett School of Architecture in London.

[Image: Photo courtesy of Tesla].

The idea behind the tour was not only to see robots at work but to experience the spatial logic of a factory, its interior the size of 80 football fields broken down into sequential functions and clusters, with color-coded circulation diagrams painted directly onto the concrete floor.

At least those were the paths meant for humans. For self-driving robots, long curving whirls of magnetic tape had been applied to the floor, forming cursive, counter-directional arabesques that only made sense when you considered the aggressive turning radii of those bulky machines.

It was the robot-readable world firsthand, or an indoor landscape architecture for machines.

There is a strict no-photo policy in place, unfortunately, and you are obliged to sign a non-disclosure agreement prior to entering the facility, so the only interior photos I have to show are from Wikipedia and Tesla's own press page.

[Image: Photo by Steve Jurvetson, via Wikipedia].

The actual tour is very much in the vein of a corporate sales pitch, and it is delivered with true American gusto (and at very high volume), but it's worth taking. Technically, by entering the factory you step into a foreign free-trade zone, which, for anyone else reading Keller Easterling's new book, is an interesting thing to do in person, like entering a corporate eruv.

Once inside, you see things like aluminum rapid-injection molds, laser-cutting stations, and emergency "light curtains" dividing humans from the machines they steward. You see "laser-calibration trees," or knobby poles branching with small geometric ornaments; they are used by laser-scanners for re-booting themselves after measuring the frames of new cars.

At the very end of the process, you see massive, Japanese-made robots lifting entire finished Teslas overhead as if they're feathers. Each machine has been named by Elon Musk after X-Men characters: there is Thunderbird and Cyclops, Storm and Colossus, Xavier, Changeling, Ice Man, Wolverine, and Angel.

[Image: Photo courtesy of Tesla].

And, perhaps best of all, you might be lucky enough to see engineers training new robots for eventual roles in the assembly process.

Our tram slowed down for just a few seconds so we could watch a woman, less than two-thirds the size of the mechanical arm lurching back and forth in front of her, patiently coding new movements into the gyroscopes and actuators inside the machine.

Uncertain of what we were seeing, we tried to make sense of the drunken movements on display, which looked more like a snake hypnotized by its master, swaying side to side like a cobra being woken up from a dream.

At one point, our tour guide gestured out at literally dozens—perhaps hundreds—of new robots still under plastic wrap, all awaiting training and installation. The factory is expanding dramatically as Tesla gears up for the release of their new SUV.

We have "an army of robots under plastic," the guide said enthusiastically, and he laughed. If there's ever a robot uprising, he joked, this is probably not the best place to be.

[Image: Photo courtesy of Tesla].

It seems that our group's educational affiliation made getting a tour much easier, but you can try your own luck using Tesla's Contact page.
29 Oct 07:57

Mangeurs d'âmes

by Filo Loco
Pierre Fromentin. André Bonne Editeur. 1958.
Filo Loco
07 Oct 08:54

The Parisianer

by admin

Parisianer-page-E-Ponzi

The Parisianer

The Parisianer est né de l’envie de deux illustrateurs parisiens de réunir un grand nombre d’artistes autour d’un projet : réaliser la Une d’un magazine imaginaire qui exprimerait sa vision subjective de Paris.
En hommage au couvertures du New Yorker, cet exercice de style présenterait un panel d’interprétations poétiques, éclectiques et surprenantes de la capitale.
Read more here

19 Oct 01:21

The Civic Minimum

by Geoff Manaugh
[Image: From Gravesend—The Death of Community by Chris Clarke].

Gravesend is a suburb east of London, hosting on its own eastern edge something of a secondary suburb: a mysterious town on the edge of town that turns out not to be a town at all.

It is a simulated English village built in 2003 by the Metropolitan Police working with Equion Facilities Management and a firm called Advanced Interactive Systems (AIS).

The barren streets and hollow buildings of this militarized non-place were designed for use as an immersive staging ground for police-training exercises, fighting staged riots, burglaries, bank robberies, and other crimes.

[Image: From Gravesend—The Death of Community by Chris Clarke].

Facades with no buildings behind them line the empty streets; in some cases, it is only through the aerial views afforded by a service like Google Maps that this reality is made clear.

Imitation bus stops, make-believe banks, and an oddly whimsical Pizzaland—like an end-times chain restaurant from Shaun of the Dead—sustain the illusion on the ground.

[Image: From Gravesend—The Death of Community by Chris Clarke].

Somewhat incongruously, an airplane fuselage also now rests beside a chainlink fence near the roadway, giving officers an opportunity to prepare for airplane hijackings.

There are even empty Tube carriages parked outside town for improvisatory police raids.

[Image: From Gravesend—The Death of Community by Chris Clarke].

According to AIS, their consultant-designers kitted out the site's "live-fire ranges with internal ballistic and anti-ricochet finishes, simulation and targetry equipment, and range sound systems," a complete multimedia package that would soon also include HD video projectors and even "laser-based 3D virtual training environments."

Architectural simulations embedded with high-tech, upgradeable media technology thus supply the necessary level of detail for repeating crimes, on demand, like strange social rituals.

[Image: From Gravesend—The Death of Community by Chris Clarke].

The photos seen here were all take by designer and photographer Chris Clarke, whose Flickr set of the series, including a dozen or so further images, is worth a look.

[Image: From Gravesend—The Death of Community by Chris Clarke].

For Clarke, the "facsimile" urbanism of this site at the end of Gravesend is actually something of "a warning—a prophecy of society's potential to alienate itself from itself." He suggests that these surreal scenes threaten to become indistinguishable from everyday life, our cities and streets stripped down to the civic minimum, used as nothing more than bleak stomping grounds for futuristic security forces armed with military-grade tools.

"We have estates, parks, nightclubs, tube stations," Clarke writes, "but is the community missing from Gravesend significantly more present in our inhabited cities and towns?" His own answer remains unspoken but obvious.

[Images: From Gravesend—The Death of Community by Chris Clarke].

Writing about this same site back in 2008, Brian Finoki of Subtopia called it a "new theater of the absurd."

It is, he wrote, "a city standing on the planet for one purpose: to be rioted, hijacked, trashed, held hostage, sacked, and overrun by thousands of chaotic scenarios, only so that it can be reclaimed, retaken, re-propped in circuitous loops of more dazzling proto-militant exercise, stormed by a thousand coordinated boots for eternity, targeted by hundreds of synchronized crosshairs of both lethal and non-lethal weapons."

[Image: From Gravesend—The Death of Community by Chris Clarke].

Check out more photos at Chris Clarke's Flickr page.

(Related: In the Box: A Tour Through the Simulated Battlefields of the U.S. National Training Center).
06 Oct 11:27

Beautiful Chemistry: Amazing Chemical Reactions Filmed with a 4K UltraHD Camera

by Christopher Jobson

Beautiful Chemistry: Amazing Chemical Reactions Filmed with a 4K UltraHD Camera macro chemistry

Beautiful Chemistry: Amazing Chemical Reactions Filmed with a 4K UltraHD Camera macro chemistry

Beautiful Chemistry: Amazing Chemical Reactions Filmed with a 4K UltraHD Camera macro chemistry

Beautiful Chemistry is a new collaboration between Tsinghua University Press and University of Science and Technology of China that seeks to make chemistry more accessible and interesting to the general public. Their first project was the creation of several short films that utilize a 4K UltraHD camera to capture a variety of striking chemical reactions without the usual clutter of test tubes, beakers or lab equipment. I definitely would have paid a bit more attention in chemistry class if we’d had the opportunity to watch some of these. Filmed and edited by Yan Liang.

10 Sep 18:30

Señor Gif - Page 17 - Funny Animated GIFs - Cheezburger

by gatito
patrick

woahh !

03 Oct 21:22

I'm sure this is what parenting will be like. I'm sure of it.

19 Aug 17:12

Designer Marcel Dunger Creates Jewelry by Fusing Colorful Bio-Resin to Pieces of Broken Maple Wood

by Christopher Jobson

Designer Marcel Dunger Creates Jewelry by Fusing Colorful Bio Resin to Pieces of Broken Maple Wood wood resin jewelry fashion

Designer Marcel Dunger Creates Jewelry by Fusing Colorful Bio Resin to Pieces of Broken Maple Wood wood resin jewelry fashion

Designer Marcel Dunger Creates Jewelry by Fusing Colorful Bio Resin to Pieces of Broken Maple Wood wood resin jewelry fashion

Designer Marcel Dunger Creates Jewelry by Fusing Colorful Bio Resin to Pieces of Broken Maple Wood wood resin jewelry fashion

Designer Marcel Dunger Creates Jewelry by Fusing Colorful Bio Resin to Pieces of Broken Maple Wood wood resin jewelry fashion

Designer Marcel Dunger Creates Jewelry by Fusing Colorful Bio Resin to Pieces of Broken Maple Wood wood resin jewelry fashion

Designer Marcel Dunger Creates Jewelry by Fusing Colorful Bio Resin to Pieces of Broken Maple Wood wood resin jewelry fashion

Product designer Marcel Dunger conceived of this fascinating and elegent way of creating small rings, pendants, and earrings by “repairing” broken pieces of maple wood with colored bio-resins. The resin is first poured onto a larger piece of broken wood and after the hardening process the piece is then machined into pieces of jewelry.

We’ve seen so many different projects using resin lately from sculptures of aquatic life to hair ornaments, but what’s probably more interesting, as pointed out by The Fox is Black’s Bobby Solomon, is the trend of visibly incorporating repairs into new or improved objects. We’ve seen it with Japanese Kintsugi pieces, furniture created by fusing tree trunks with cast aluminum, and even another wood/resin combo resulting in glowing kitchen shelves. As far as turning waste products into functional objects, or extending the life of something broken, it’s a visually striking idea that will hopefully be incorporated by more artists and designers. You can see more of Dunger’s work in his online portfolio. (via The Fox is Black, Behance)

Update: Jewelry designer Britta Boeckmann creates a similar form of jewelry and has quite a few pieces available in her shop.

18 Aug 20:34

Men’s Health “How a Bean Becomes a Fart”

by Justin Cone
Giant Ant strikes again for Men’s Health, this time explaining how a bean becomes a gaseous expulsion of malodorous intent (i.e. a fart). Check out their previous project for Men’s Health, “How a Protein Becomes a Muscle.” Credits Client: Men’s Health Magazine Creative Director: Thomas O’Quinn Illustrator: Rami Niemi Directed by Giant Ant Producer: Cory... Read more »
19 Aug 13:34

Sprawling Cardboard Architecture by Nina Lindgren

by Christopher Jobson

Sprawling Cardboard Architecture by Nina Lindgren sculpture cardboard architecture

Sprawling Cardboard Architecture by Nina Lindgren sculpture cardboard architecture

Sprawling Cardboard Architecture by Nina Lindgren sculpture cardboard architecture

Sprawling Cardboard Architecture by Nina Lindgren sculpture cardboard architecture

Sprawling Cardboard Architecture by Nina Lindgren sculpture cardboard architecture

Sprawling Cardboard Architecture by Nina Lindgren sculpture cardboard architecture

Stockholm-based illustrator, printmaker, and artist Nina Lindgren was been working with cardboard to build a series of stacked geometric cityscapes that look like small architectural islands. The works are assembled like puzzles from carefully cut cardboard panels with internal lights for some of the houses. Her most recent piece, “Floating City” was recently on view at ArtRebels Gallery. You can see more over on her website. (via Hi-Fructose)

08 Aug 15:24

Imaginative Industrial Flying Machines Made From Cardboard by Daniel Agdag

by Johnny Strategy

Imaginative Industrial Flying Machines Made From Cardboard by Daniel Agdag sculpture flying flight cardboard

Imaginative Industrial Flying Machines Made From Cardboard by Daniel Agdag sculpture flying flight cardboard

Imaginative Industrial Flying Machines Made From Cardboard by Daniel Agdag sculpture flying flight cardboard

Imaginative Industrial Flying Machines Made From Cardboard by Daniel Agdag sculpture flying flight cardboard

Imaginative Industrial Flying Machines Made From Cardboard by Daniel Agdag sculpture flying flight cardboard

If you want to create detailed and imaginative flying machine sculptures that look like they’re about to take flight, cardboard is hardly the material to use. Unless of course you’re artist Daniel Agdag (previously), who has been toiling away creating a series of new works each more detailed and fascinating than the next. “The Principles of Aerodynamics” is Agdag’s first solo exhibition where his series of cardboard contraptions that portray his “ongoing pursuit of escape through the metaphor of flight” will be on display through Aug 31, 2014.

As he’s done in the past, Agdag forfeits all blueprints, drawings and plans choosing, instead, to work only from mind and scalpel. His industrial beasts–get close and you can almost smell the oil and smoke; hear the clanking and buzzing–come together only from sliced cardboard hinged with glue.

12 Aug 23:25

Photo



13 Aug 17:29

Edible Chocolate LEGOs by Akihiro Mizuuchi

by Christopher Jobson

Edible Chocolate LEGOs by Akihiro Mizuuchi Lego food chocolate

Edible Chocolate LEGOs by Akihiro Mizuuchi Lego food chocolate

Edible Chocolate LEGOs by Akihiro Mizuuchi Lego food chocolate

Edible Chocolate LEGOs by Akihiro Mizuuchi Lego food chocolate

Edible Chocolate LEGOs by Akihiro Mizuuchi Lego food chocolate

Edible Chocolate LEGOs by Akihiro Mizuuchi Lego food chocolate

Edible Chocolate LEGOs by Akihiro Mizuuchi Lego food chocolate

Illustrator and designer Akihiro Mizuuchi designed a modular system for creating edible chocolate LEGO bricks. Chocolate is first poured into precisely designed moulds that after cooling can be popped out and used as regular LEGOs. It’s hard to determine exactly how functional they are, it seems like he had success in building a number of different things, though I can only imagine how quickly they might melt in your hands, but I suppose that’s beside the point; this is two of the greatest things in the world fused together. If you google around there are numerous attempts at creating various forms of LEGO in chocolate or other food, but this appears to be the most detailed and well-designed of anything out there. (via Legosaurus)

24 Mar 06:28

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27 Jul 23:30

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29 Jul 21:02

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30 Jul 14:27

New Conceptual Fine Art Photography from Oleg Oprisco

by Christopher Jobson

New Conceptual Fine Art Photography from Oleg Oprisco surreal portraits conceptual

New Conceptual Fine Art Photography from Oleg Oprisco surreal portraits conceptual

New Conceptual Fine Art Photography from Oleg Oprisco surreal portraits conceptual

New Conceptual Fine Art Photography from Oleg Oprisco surreal portraits conceptual

New Conceptual Fine Art Photography from Oleg Oprisco surreal portraits conceptual

New Conceptual Fine Art Photography from Oleg Oprisco surreal portraits conceptual

New Conceptual Fine Art Photography from Oleg Oprisco surreal portraits conceptual

New Conceptual Fine Art Photography from Oleg Oprisco surreal portraits conceptual

Photographer Oleg Oprisco (previously) who lives and works in Kiev, continues to wow us with his vivid style of conceptual photography that places subjects in the middle of surreal and fantastic tableaus. Oprisco spends large amounts of time scouring flea markets and resale shops to collect props, costumes, and other items for each shot which he often sketches beforehand in a sketchbook, with the final shoot requiring 2-3 days of preparation. I love this bit from an interview with 500px earlier this year where he was asked to give advice to amateur/student photographers:

I strongly advise to use your time wisely. Laziness is your worst enemy. Enough looking at photographs taken by your idols. You’ve commented on enough work that you hate. It’s time to take photos. Your best photos. Let go and shoot, shoot, shoot!

All of Oprisco’s work is available as prints which you can inquire about directly. You can see more of his recent work on Flickr and Facebook. (via 500px)

16 Jul 15:13

Collector’s Space Shuttle Screenprints! I’ll be debuting 3 new...







Collector’s Space Shuttle Screenprints!

I’ll be debuting 3 new screenprints at Comic Con next week commemorating the amazing Space Shuttle program which spanned 30 years! These will be available indivudually or as a set. Each one is 10”x28”.

Come visit me and my friends Jasmin Lai and Tiffany Ford at Booth #5007!

23 Jul 18:56

Michela Picchi

by Dave

Michela Picchi on grainedit.com

Beautiful illustration work from Berlin-based designer Michela Picchi.

 

 

Michela Picchi on grainedit.com

Michela Picchi on grainedit.com

Michela Picchi on grainedit.com

 

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Also worth viewing:

Vicki Turner
Timothy Hunt
Tom haugomat

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24 Mar 16:17

30 Day Challenge // Day 24 // Something That Represents Your...



30 Day Challenge // Day 24 // Something That Represents Your Favorite Culture

I’m Buddhist and I’ve always loved the imagery even before I was. The wrathful deities from Tibetan and Mahayana art always fascinated me as a kid. They were like transformations the gods took on in battle. Like a monster magical girl I guess. His is name is Mahakala. Power Prism Make Up.

10 Mar 15:27

30 Day Challenge // Day 23 // Something That Makes You Happy...







30 Day Challenge // Day 23 // Something That Makes You Happy

I’ve learned how to cook since I moved out to California. It’s therapeutic. And delicious~ I garnish everything with a fried egg, and I never regret it.