Shared posts

26 Sep 01:46

Monstros Contemporâneos II

by Filipe Remedios

26 Sep 19:20

Kevin Francis Gray Sculptures

by Daniella

Kevin Francis Gray est un artiste irlandais qui a exposé à la Pace Gallery de New York une série de sculptures de forme humaine. La particularité de ses oeuvres faites de marbre et de bronze réside dans l’aspect brillant des matériaux et le souci du détail. A découvrir dans la suite.


Kevin Francis Gray Sculptures-11 Kevin Francis Gray Sculptures-10 Kevin Francis Gray Sculptures-9 Kevin Francis Gray Sculptures-8 Kevin Francis Gray Sculptures-7 Kevin Francis Gray Sculptures-6 Kevin Francis Gray Sculptures-5 Kevin Francis Gray Sculptures-4 Kevin Francis Gray Sculptures-3 Kevin Francis Gray Sculptures-2 Kevin Francis Gray Sculptures-1 Kevin Francis Gray Sculptures-0

27 Sep 20:27

Little Planet Photos That Feature Rocket Launches, Air Shows, and Mars

013_b

Estonian photographer Andrew Bodrov of 360Pano has been shooting panoramic photographs for over a decade in countries around the world. His work even spans planets: last year he released an interactive panorama created using photos shot on Mars.

One of his interesting side projects is his Little Planets series, which features stereographic projections created using some pretty interesting source panoramas.

The images show everything from rocket launches and air shows to the Curiosity rover sitting on a tiny Mars. Many of the photos include something interesting that make them slightly different from ordinary ‘little planet’ photos you’ll come across:

043_b

053_b

001_b

002_b

012_b

015_b

046_b

068_b

070_b

Here’s an out-of-this-world image of Mars created using this composite panorama:

026_b

You can find more images from this series here. Some of the source photos that these images were created with can be found here.

(via Reframe)


Image credits: Photographs by Andrew Bodrov and used with permission

16 Sep 18:17

Artist Photographs His Adorable Bull Terrier Jimmy in Creative, Fun and Silly Situations

by DL Cade

bull1

Rafael Mantesso‘s dog, an adorable bull terrier named Jimmy Choo, is taking the Internet by storm today after Mantesso’s creative Instagram photos of Jimmy caught the attention of the world at large.

An artist and editor, Mantesso draws, dresses and otherwise inserts an unbelievably cooperative Jimmy into countless fun adventures on his Instagram account — from a screaming vocal performance, to a day spent with troublemaking cartoon duo Calvin and Hobbes.

Mantesso tells us that these photographs and the viral fame that followed all started with a divorce.

“My ex-wife took all the furniture in the house and the house was completely empty and white,” he said. “The only thing I had was the jimmy and a complement and empty white house.” And so, he decided to take this picture:

bull20

It was just an image of the two ‘holding hands,’ symbolizing the friendship they had, but this photo birthed another, and then another, and before long Mantesso was creating them almost every day.

Enlisting his drawing and painting skills to create the backgrounds, Mantesso then uses his iPhone to shoot the images and VSCOCam to edit them. What comes out the other end are images that many of us just can’t help smiling at:

bull2

bull3

bull4

bull5

bull6

bull7

bull8

bull9

bull10

bull11

bull12

bull13

bull14

bull15

bull16

bull17

bull18

For Mantesso, the best part of the press attention is the positive image he hopes these photos create for bully breeds.

I always dreamed of having a bull terrier. I think they’re an amazing race in terms of behavior, personality, the love they demonstrate to their owners and especially the aesthetics of them.

Jimmy will be 5 years old on December 29, and he’s definitely my best friend and companion. I hate it when people turn away or cross the street for fear of him, people think the bull terrier/pit bull dogs are murderers and bloodthirsty.

That, he maintains, just isn’t the case. And if these cute pictures of Jimmy eating with Lady from Lady and the Tramp or giving out free hugs will help change that perception, all the better.

bull19

To keep up with Jimmy as he continues to go on his wild adventures, be sure to give Mantesso’s Instagram account a follow by clicking here.

(via Boing Boing)


Image credits: Photographs by Rafael Mantesso and used with permission

12 Sep 19:17

Geometric Dichroic Glass Installations by Chris Wood

by Christopher Jobson

Geometric Dichroic Glass Installations by Chris Wood sculpture reflection light installation glass geometric

Geometric Dichroic Glass Installations by Chris Wood sculpture reflection light installation glass geometric

Geometric Dichroic Glass Installations by Chris Wood sculpture reflection light installation glass geometric

Geometric Dichroic Glass Installations by Chris Wood sculpture reflection light installation glass geometric

Geometric Dichroic Glass Installations by Chris Wood sculpture reflection light installation glass geometric

Geometric Dichroic Glass Installations by Chris Wood sculpture reflection light installation glass geometric

Geometric Dichroic Glass Installations by Chris Wood sculpture reflection light installation glass geometric

Geometric Dichroic Glass Installations by Chris Wood sculpture reflection light installation glass geometric

Geometric Dichroic Glass Installations by Chris Wood sculpture reflection light installation glass geometric

Geometric Dichroic Glass Installations by Chris Wood sculpture reflection light installation glass geometric

Artist Chris Wood works with colored glass to create colorful, prism-like mazes and mandalas of light installed vertically on walls. Her most common material is dichroic (meaning ‘two color’) glass, a material invented by NASA in the 1950s that has a special optical coating meant to reflect certain wavelengths of light while letting others through. At some angles the glass appears completely reflective, somewhat like a mirror of gold. Wood has constructed a number of different glass, mirror, and other light installations which have been carefully documented on her website. (via My Modern Met)

12 Sep 05:00

10 Wonderfully Adorable Cartoons by Liz Climo

by Alex Santoso

This is neat: Liz Climo, a character artist/storyboard revisionist on The Simpsons and a wonderful cartoonist, to boot, is launching her new book The Little World of Liz later this month. If you pre-order the book, you can get an exclusive signed 3x5 postcard with a grand prize winner getting a custom print from Liz.

We've posted about Liz many times before on Neatorama, so we're very familiar with her funny and adorable comics and are thrilled to showcase 10 of her wonderful comics.

Enjoy!

 

 

 

Don't forget to Visit Liz' official Tumblr for more fantastic comics - Thanks Dana!

Bonus cartoon:

12 Sep 20:39

‘Soviet Ghosts’ Captures Post-Apocalyptic Scenes Left Behind by the Fall of the USSR

BULGARIA -Buzludzha 09

Rebecca Litchfield is a photographer who has faced radiation exposure risks, arrest and interrogations, and even accusations of espionage… all for the sake of her project “Soviet Ghosts.”

You see, Litchfield is an avid urban explorer who has been fascinated by scenes of decay found in countries that were formerly part of the USSR and the Eastern Bloc.

Photographing and exploring the old Iron Curtain isn’t the easiest thing to turn into a project, she says:

Not many explorers travel to Russia, where the rules are very different, locations are heavily guarded and a strong military presence exists everywhere. There are serious consequences for getting caught. We managed to stay hidden for all of the trip, we maximised our stealthiness, ducking and diving into bushes and sneaking past sleeping security. But on day three our good fortune ran out as we visited a top secret radar installation. After walking through the forest, mosquitos attacking us from all directions, we saw the radar and made our way towards it, but just metres away suddenly we were joined by military and they weren’t happy…

Fortunately for Litchfield, she was able to wiggle out of that tricky situation and continue her adventure through more than 10 different countries.

She says that her goal is to capture the scenes as they are, highlighting their beauty in decay, “like a memory hanging on that will soon be lost in a breeze, a museum that no one gets to see.”

Here are some of the haunting photographs in the project:

BULGARIA - Soviet Friendship Monument

BULGARIA -Buzludzha 01

BULGARIA -Buzludzha 10

ESTONIA - PATAREI PRISON 02

ESTONIA - THEATRE

GERMANY - Miltary Barracks

GERMANY - Soviet HeadQuarters 01

HUNGARY - MAV 424 Steam Train

LATVIA - IRBENE 02

LATVIA - IRBENE 03

LATVIA - SCHOOL

RUSSIA - Chemical Laboratory

RUSSIA - Cinema

RUSSIA - Sanatorium 01

RUSSIA - Sanatorium 03

RUSSIA - Tuberculosis Hospital

RUSSIA - Young Pioneer Camp 02

RUSSIA - Young Pioneer Camp 04

UKRAINE - Chernobyl Hospital 02

UKRAINE - Chernobyl Kindergarten

UKRAINE - Chernobyl Sports Centre 01

UKRAINE - Chernobyl Sports Centre 02

The photos in the project have also been published in a book that’s available from $28 over on Amazon. You can also find more of Litchfield’s work over on her website.


Image credits: Photographs by Rebecca Litchfield and used with permission

10 Sep 20:30

Artist Uses Forced Perspective Photography to Capture Whimsical Window Silhouettes

by DL Cade

silhouettes6

Spanish artist Pejac has never been a man contained by the borders of a canvas; his art, often silhouette based, bleeds out of frames and into the real world.

Most of the time, this feat is achieved with nothing more than a disregard for those borders, but one of his series of works instead used forced perspective photography to achieve the same effect and create the illusion that his whimsical silhouettes were playing with the world outside his window.

These forced perspective photographs caught the public’s eye when Pejac posted the picture above to his Facebook. It was a tribute to French high-wire walker, Philippe Petit, created in honor of the 40th anniversary of Petit’s legendary walk between the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center, and people were enamored with it.

silhouettes7

The magazine Hi-Fructose got in touch with the artist to inquire about it and, as it turns out, this wasn’t his first experiment with forced perspective photography and window silhouettes. In 2011 he created more of these illusions while living in an apartment surrounded by security cameras in Valencia.

Those images, along with the few he created as a tribute to the iconic Petit, are included in the gallery below:

silhouettes3

silhouettes4

silhouettes5

silhouettes

silhouettes8

silhouettes9

silhouettes10

And here are a few behind the scenes photos that show the artist at work, and the photography setup:

silhouettes11

silhouettes1

silhouettes2

To see more of Pejac’s work — and trust us when we say it is truly stunning, even when it doesn’t have a photographic element — be sure to visit his website and give him a follow on Facebook and Instagram.

(via Fubiz)


Image credits: Photographs courtesy of Pejac.

08 Sep 16:58

‘Os Gemeos’ Converts Industrial Silos in Vancouver into Towering Giants

by Christopher Jobson

Os Gemeos Converts Industrial Silos in Vancouver into Towering Giants Vancouver street art murals
Photo by roaming-the-planet

Os Gemeos Converts Industrial Silos in Vancouver into Towering Giants Vancouver street art murals
Photo by roaming-the-planet

Os Gemeos Converts Industrial Silos in Vancouver into Towering Giants Vancouver street art murals

Os Gemeos Converts Industrial Silos in Vancouver into Towering Giants Vancouver street art murals
Photos by roaming-the-planet

Os Gemeos Converts Industrial Silos in Vancouver into Towering Giants Vancouver street art murals

Os Gemeos Converts Industrial Silos in Vancouver into Towering Giants Vancouver street art murals

Os Gemeos Converts Industrial Silos in Vancouver into Towering Giants Vancouver street art murals

Os Gemeos Converts Industrial Silos in Vancouver into Towering Giants Vancouver street art murals

First a Boeing 747, and now an industrial complex on a Vancover island; it seems no canvas is too large for Brazilian graffiti artists Os Gemeos who were invited to the Vancouver Biennale to turn six multi-story silos on Granville Island into their trademark ‘Giants.’ The murals on the 70-foot towers are now the largest paintings ever attempted by the pair, an astounding feat considering Os Gemeos completely donated a month of their time to create the non-profit art project. An Indiegogo fundraising campaign to recoup costs associated with painting the silos has been extremely successful. You can see more over on Arrested Motion.

02 Sep 04:40

Photo

by abbyinamerica


01 Sep 14:15

Alienation: Strange Upside-Down Closeups Transform the Human Face Into Something Else

by DL Cade

alien15

The more you look at South-Africa based photographer Anelia Loubser‘s Alienation series, the more captivated you become. A simple idea on the surface — close-up, upside-down black-and-white portraits of people’s eyes and foreheads — the final images encourage you to dive deeper into each wrinkle and other so-called “imperfection” than almost any standard portrait might.

According to Loubser’s description of the series on Behance, Alienation was inspired by a profound Wayne Dyer quote:

If you change the way you look at things, the things you look at change.

With creative composition and excellent execution of a simple idea, she manages to put a picture to these words:

alien2

alien3

alien4

alien5

alien6

alien7

alien8

alien9

alien10

alien11

alien12

alien13

alien14

The concept reminds us of the famous upside-down drawing exercise. The idea behind this approach was to confuse the analytical left side of the brain, engaging the more abstract right side that would see the lines as they truly were and not as a group of already-defined concepts (i.e. nose, eyes, eyebrows, etc.).

Of course, some will inevitably be tempted to crane their necks or flip their computer screens to reframe the portraits in a more ‘normal’ light, but we hope you won’t do that. As Loubser says, “the work is on the one hand strangely aesthetic, on the other hand mysteriously eerie.” A little bit of discomfort isn’t just normal, it’s encouraged.

To see more from Loubser, head over to her Behance profile, check out her website, or give her Facebook page a like.

(via Photojojo)


Image credits: Photographs by Anelia Loubser, used under Creative Commons license

31 Aug 18:30

‘Self-Portraits with Men’ Series Explores the ‘What-Ifs’ of Life with Different Partners

Dita_Pepe_041

Have you ever wondered what you life would be like if you ended up with one of your exes? Or just a random person on the street, somebody whose trajectory in life would have changed your own drastically?

Czech photographer Dita Pepe has, but she took it an step further than most of us when she turned these spousal what-ifs into a series of portraits that take an interesting look at “what might have been” had her family life taken a different direction.

Pepe started the series by posing with friends and acquaintances, men and their children that she actually knew. As the series progressed, however, she eventually started reaching out to strangers, questioning in thought, execution and photographs what her life would be like had they been her partner.

Dita_Pepe_11

As a whole, the series depicts a number of archetypes present across the globe; but individually, Pepe blends in with each of the families, completely immersing herself into the question at hand.

Whether the resulting images are taken at face-value or explored more thoroughly, the series will probably have you asking similar questions of your own life. What if you had ended up with this or that person? What would your family look like? Pepe knows, and in Self-Portraits with Men, she’d like to introduce you to her ‘families’:

Dita_Pepe_06

Dita_Pepe_09

Dita_Pepe_003

Dita_Pepe_03

Dita_Pepe_10

Dita_Pepe_002

Dita_Pepe_001

Dita_Pepe_005

Dita_Pepe_07

Dita_Pepe_05

Dita_Pepe_02

To see more of Pepe’s work, head over to hear website by clicking here.

(via Feature Shoot)


Image credits: Photographs by Dita Pepe and used with permission

28 Aug 17:28

5 plank fence

28 Aug 20:30

Photographer Gives Us an Inside Look at Meghalaya, India, ‘The Wettest Place On Earth’

s_c17_eghala17

New Zealand-based photographer Amos Chapple is a name you might recognize from his intimate look inside Iran that we shared just over a year ago. Today, he’s back on PetaPixel with a series of stunning images from Meghalaya, India — a village known as ‘the wettest place on Earth.’

s_c11_eghala03

In case you’re wondering, that statement is no exaggeration: on average, Meghalaya receives 467 inches of rain per year. And while this makes it a miserable photography location for many reasons, it also makes it one of the most unique places you could possibly shoot.

In order to combat the constant downpours, the laborers of the village wear knups, which are umbrella-type hats made from bamboo and banana leaves that keep the rain from drenching them as they go about their daily routines:

s_c06_eghala13

Another intriguing characteristic of the Meghalaya community is the use of natural bridges. By ‘training’ the roots and branches of trees, villagers have created a vast infrastructure of living bridges that span rivers and more.

As time goes on, these roots continue to develop and grow stronger, making the bridge itself even sturdier… no maintenance required.

s_c01_eghala15

Chapple captures the essence of Meghalaya in an almost cinematic manner, portraying the rain-soaked day-to-day life of the village’s inhabitants in a truly enchanting set of photographs:

s_c13_eghala06

s_c03_eghala07

s_c10_eghala02

s_c18_eghala19

s_c04_eghala04

s_c15_eghala16

s_c09_eghala05

s_c05_eghala12

s_c08_eghala18

s_c02_eghala01

s_c07_eghala21

s_c14_eghala11

s_c12_eghala10

s_c16_eghala23

To keep up with Chapple’s work, check out our previous coverage and then head on over to Facebook and give his page a like.

(via The Atlantic)


Image credits: Photographs by Amos Chapple and used with permission

04 May 17:00

Your Workplace Selfies Are Probably Much More Mundane

25 Aug 18:05

Humorous New Site-Specific Paintings on the Streets of Paris by Pejac

by Christopher Jobson

Humorous New Site Specific Paintings on the Streets of Paris by Pejac street art humor

Humorous New Site Specific Paintings on the Streets of Paris by Pejac street art humor

Humorous New Site Specific Paintings on the Streets of Paris by Pejac street art humor

Humorous New Site Specific Paintings on the Streets of Paris by Pejac street art humor

Humorous New Site Specific Paintings on the Streets of Paris by Pejac street art humor

Humorous New Site Specific Paintings on the Streets of Paris by Pejac street art humor

Humorous New Site Specific Paintings on the Streets of Paris by Pejac street art humor

Street artist Pejac (previously) was recently in Paris where he created at least three new works almost guaranteed to make you smile. The first appears to be a figure throwing a water balloon at a wall, but on closer inspection the giant splat contains a painting of Manet’s famous The Luncheon on the Grass. The second involves a pair of children who appear to be burning ants with a magnifying glass in a spot of sunlight, but once viewed close-up the tiny figures are revealed to be small people instead of insects. Lastly he made use of a thick wall crack to form the edge of a ghostly looking door. You can see a few more views over on StreetArtNews.

24 Aug 16:07

‘Summertime’ Photo Series Captures the Carefree Joys of Summer in the Countryside

Summetime-Photography18-640x426

Summertime is quickly turning into Autumn. Before we know it, the sunshine and green tones that surround us will transform into fiery hues, with plenty of rain and wind to follow. But that hasn’t stopped Polish photographer Izabela Urbaniak from attempting to eternalize the carefree nature of summer in a beautiful black-and-white photo series titled Summertime.

Summertime is born out of the joy of motherhood, as Urbaniak captures her children enjoying the idyllic moments of summer in the tiny Polish village of Lugowiska before they’ve gone. Playing with animals, hopping into ponds, enjoying the peaceful back-and-forth of a tree swing… Urbaniak captures the essence of summer in the most natural of ways.

Summetime-Photography17-640x426

Speaking with Bored Panda about the series, she reveals her inspiration behind the series:

The series is inspired by my own childhood, when I used to visit my grandmother in the summer and spend my school vacations in the countryside. These days, I just love watching kids play in the countryside – my younger son Antek loves to play with his cousins Jas, Maja and Julia. There’s also my lovely Jack Russel terrier Tosia, as well as a cat and some puppies that belong to our neighbors.

The photos, she continues, are the results of “careful observation” and not staged. Captured with a 5D Mark III, 50mm f/1.4 and 85mm f/1.2, she maintains that these are moments as they happened:

Summetime-Photography15-640x426

Summetime-Photography3-640x426

Summetime-Photography5-640x426

Summetime-Photography27-640x426

Summetime-Photography20-640x426

Summetime-Photography8-640x426

Summetime-Photography22-640x426

Summetime-Photography23-640x426

Summetime-Photography21-640x426

Summetime-Photography19-640x426

Summetime-Photography24-640x426

Summetime-Photography10-640x426

Summetime-Photography13-640x426

Summetime-Photography11-640x426

Summetime-Photography6-640x640

Summetime-Photography25-640x426

Summetime-Photography16-640x426

Summetime-Photography2-640x426

Summetime-Photography7-640x426

Summetime-Photography9-640x426

Summetime-Photography1-640x426

Summetime-Photography4-640x426

Summetime-Photography26-640x426

To see more or keep up with her as she continues to create more photography like what you see above, head over to her website by clicking here.

(via Fubiz)


Image credits: Photographs by Izabela Urbaniak and used with permission

20 Aug 16:28

Artist Maskull Lasserre Carves Imagined Skeletons into Souvenir Sculptures and Decoys

by Christopher Jobson

Artist Maskull Lasserre Carves Imagined Skeletons into Souvenir Sculptures and Decoys wood sculpture anatomy
Decoy Study (Duck), 2014. 15 x 5 x 6 inches.

Artist Maskull Lasserre Carves Imagined Skeletons into Souvenir Sculptures and Decoys wood sculpture anatomy
Decoy Study (Duck), 2014. 15 x 5 x 6 inches.

Artist Maskull Lasserre Carves Imagined Skeletons into Souvenir Sculptures and Decoys wood sculpture anatomy
Decoy Study (Duck), 2014. 15 x 5 x 6 inches.

Artist Maskull Lasserre Carves Imagined Skeletons into Souvenir Sculptures and Decoys wood sculpture anatomy
Souvenir Skeleton, 2014. (re-)carved African drummer figure. 10 x 5 x 26 inches.

Artist Maskull Lasserre Carves Imagined Skeletons into Souvenir Sculptures and Decoys wood sculpture anatomy
Souvenir Skeleton, 2014. (re-)carved African drummer figure. 10 x 5 x 26 inches.

Artist Maskull Lasserre Carves Imagined Skeletons into Souvenir Sculptures and Decoys wood sculpture anatomy
Souvenir Skeleton, 2014. (re-)carved African drummer figure. 10 x 5 x 26 inches.

Artist Maskull Lasserre Carves Imagined Skeletons into Souvenir Sculptures and Decoys wood sculpture anatomy
Souvenir Skeleton, 2014. (re-)carved African drummer figure. 10 x 5 x 26 inches.

Artist Maskull Lasserre Carves Imagined Skeletons into Souvenir Sculptures and Decoys wood sculpture anatomy
Shaman Anatomy, 2014. (re-)carved South American shaman bust. 5 x 5 x 20 inches.

Artist Maskull Lasserre Carves Imagined Skeletons into Souvenir Sculptures and Decoys wood sculpture anatomy
Shaman Anatomy, 2014. (re-)carved South American shaman bust. 5 x 5 x 20 inches.

Artist Maskull Lasserre Carves Imagined Skeletons into Souvenir Sculptures and Decoys wood sculpture anatomy
Shaman Anatomy, 2014. (re-)carved South American shaman bust. 5 x 5 x 20 inches.

For his latest body of work, artist Maskull Lasserre acquired a number of souvenir sculptures, the kind found in antique stores or craft fairs that have been mass-produced by anonymous artists, which he then used as a foundation for his own artwork. In a process he refers to as “re-carving,” Lasserre removed details from the artist’s original work to reveal intricate skeletal structures, a process we’ve marveled at numerous times over the last few years here on Colossal. If you happen to be in New York, the pieces are on view for two more days at Junior Projects as part of the Regular JOhn show curated by Jim Lee. You can see many more photos of each piece over in Lasserre’s portfolio. (via Design Milk)

21 Aug 20:00

Creative Retouching Turns Classic Glass Plate Portraits Into Modern Day Fine Art

by DL Cade

costica_7

If you follow PetaPixel, you’re already familiar with the haunting portrait archive of Costica Acsinte. For decades after the end of World War I, Acsinte was possibly the only professional photographer in all of Romania, and the over 5,000 glass plate negatives he left behind are now being painstakingly digitized so that they don’t succumb to the ravages of time.

And as these photographic treasures are digitized, one photographer is plying her retouching skill to turn the black-and-white, somber images into fantasy fine art portraits.

That photographer’s name is Jane Long, and her creative series Dancing with Costica began as a way to brush up on her retouching skills, but it has turned into something more out of the desire to tell a story:

“After finding the Costică Acsinte Archive on Flickr I became fascinated with the images and their subjects,” she tells us. “I wanted to bring them to life. But more than that I wanted to give them a story.”

See if you can guess the story in the photographs below:

costica_1

costica_2

costica_3

costica_4

costica_5

costica_6

“I will probably never know the real stories of these people,” says Long, “but in my mind they became characters in tales of my own invention… star-crossed lovers, a girl waiting for her lover to come home, boys sharing a fantasy, innocent children with a little hint of something dark.”

“Restoring the images,” she continues, “is only part of the process, the rest is the dance.”

To see more of Long’s work, or if you’d like to follow along as she continues to ‘dance’ with Acsinte’s portraits, be sure to visit her website or give her a follow on Flickr and Facebook.


Image credits: Original photographs by Costica Acsinte via Flickr Commons, recreations by Jane Long and used with permission.

21 Aug 00:00

John Kenneth Galbraith

"The only function of economic forecasting is to make astrology look respectable."
11 Aug 16:00

Photo Series Pays Tribute to the Insane Burdens People Around the World Carry on Their Heads

carry

Photographer Floriane de Lassée took a playful approach to the cultural trends of individuals carrying a plethora of objects, balanced on top of their heads. Titled How Much Can You Carry, the series is a tribute to those from remote communities in Bolivia, India and Indonesia who carry immense burdens on their heads as a means to efficiently get objects from one location to another.

Despite the difficult task of balancing and carrying the objects on their heads, the subjects in the photos all seem to have a vibrant sense of pride, with smiles glimmering underneath books, textiles and more. Below are a number of images from the series that Floriane de Lassée was kind enough to share with us.

carry2

carry5

carry6

carry4

carry9

carry7

carry8

To read more about the series and to see Floriane’s other work, you can head over to her website, here.

(via Junk Culture)


Image credits: Photographs by Floriane de Lassée and used with permission

09 Aug 17:20

This Artist Has Put Together an Uber-Creative Diorama Every Day for the Past Three Years

by DL Cade

diorama1

For the past three and a half years, Japanese artist Tanaka Tatsuya‘s daily to-do list has included creating and photographing a miniature diorama. Part of his project Miniature Calendar, you can follow his little miniature figurines through all manner of creative adventures, starting in April of 2011 and still ongoing today.

In fact, the diorama for today, dubbed Deforestation, has already gone live.

diorama21

This project is impressive for any number of reasons: how long he’s kept it up, how well done each of the dioramas are, and how creative he’s gotten with the ‘props,’ just to name a few.

Broccoli for trees, spaghetti for rainfall, camera lenses for factory towers and an unfurled roll of toilet paper for a waterfall are just a few of the creative ideas that Tanaka is still having to this day. And his ideas haven’t gotten less impressive over time, they’ve gotten better.

But don’t take our word for it, scroll down to see some of our favorite Miniature Calendar creations from this past year:

diorama2

diorama3

diorama4

diorama5

diorama6

diorama7

diorama8

diorama9

diorama10

diorama11

diorama12

diorama13

diorama14

diorama15

diorama16

diorama17

diorama18

diorama19

diorama20

To see more of Tanaka’s uber-creative dioramas or buy the Miniature Life photobook he’s put together from the project, head over to his website by clicking here. And if you’d like to keep up with him as he continues to update the Miniature Calendar day-by-day, be sure to give him a follow on Facebook as well.

(via Laughing Squid)


Image credits: Photographs by Tanaka Tatsuya and used with permission

04 Aug 19:55

Photographer’s Unique Layered Prints Show People Melting Into Landscapes

43_tautochronos10small

German photographer Michel Lamoller has created an incredible series of photo collages that depict subjects melting into their environment.

Titled Tautochronos, the series is composed of unique portraits where individuals become camouflaged in the most unusual of ways. Made purely of physical prints, cut with a scalpel and layered neatly before being captured once again, these physical photo manipulations add a strange and unique sense of depth to the scenes depicted.

Below are a number of creations from the series, ranging between 6 to 8 layers of prints.

43_tautochronos 12klein

43_tautochronos13final2klein

43_tautochronos 11small

43_tautochronos 8

43_tautochronos4

43_tautochronos7small

43_tautochronos-IIa

43_tautochronos9_1small

43_Tautochronos-I

43_tautochronos14Nsmall

To check out the full series, head on over to Lamoller’s website.

(via PhotoJoJo)

05 Aug 01:40

Failed panoramic.

01 Aug 15:08

Fun New Murals by ROA Utilize Tunisia’s Domed Architecture

by Christopher Jobson

Fun New Murals by ROA Utilize Tunisias Domed Architecture Tunisia street art murals

Fun New Murals by ROA Utilize Tunisias Domed Architecture Tunisia street art murals

Fun New Murals by ROA Utilize Tunisias Domed Architecture Tunisia street art murals

Fun New Murals by ROA Utilize Tunisias Domed Architecture Tunisia street art murals

Belgian street artist ROA (previously) is currently in Tunisia along with 150 other participating artists for Galerie Itinerrance’s Djerbahood open air museum project in Djerba, Tunisia. The artist cleverly took advantage of the many domed buildings in the city for several of his monochromatic spray paint murals that spread across multiple surfaces. You can see more recent pieces on the Djerbahood website. (via Savage Habit, Street Art News)

30 Jul 20:32

Photomicrographer Captures the Stunning, Jagged Landscapes Inside Gemstones

by DL Cade

biotite-in-Topaz

There is beauty in imperfection. In fact, imperfection might be considered the subject within a subject that photomicrographer Danny Sanchez tirelessly seeks out to create his stunning photography.

Sanchez’s main subjects are gemstones, but the colorful, alien ‘landscapes’ he captures are made up of imperfections called ‘inclusions’ that actually make a gem less valuable. You might say that one gem merchant’s trash is a gem photographer’s treasure.

Sanchez travels to gem shows and digs through bins worth of the precious stones to find the ones that, ironically, nobody actually wants. The ones that have “The stuff inside them.”

clinochlore-in-quartz-mm

Once he’s found the perfect gem, he sets to work putting his eight years of experience to use setting up and capturing his shot… which is, it turns out, extremely challenging because he’s working with razor-thin depth of field.

When we caught up with Sanchez to ask him about the photographs, he was kind enough to outline how one of these pictures comes together:

In microscopy there is little to no depth of field. For photomicrography, this presents tremendous difficulty. Luckily, there are some very helpful mechanisms to help with this problem.

  1. Before anything else – lighting, lighting, lighting. Three continuous light sources, each with their own dual fiber optic light pipes, give me 6 finely focused, intensely bright “light guides”.
  2. A motorized stepping rig. Macro photographers are familiar with linear focusing rigs – this is just a vertical version that can hold a lot more weight. With this, I move 0.025mm at a time and take a photo until I’ve covered the depth I’m looking for. That can be up to 150 photos but usually it’s around 80. Those of you who like math, 80 photos at 0.025mm steps is 2mm depth of field.
  3. Stacking software. Specialized software that will take these 80+ images and render depth. I use Helicon Focus, but there are several fantastic options.

And that description leaves out the prepping of the gem before the shoot, and the Lightroom/Photoshop work after. Make no mistake, each of these gorgeous shots is a labor of love:

dolomite-in-quartz-01-mm

negative-spears-in-quartz-02-mm

fluorite-in-quartz-mm

mountains-in-quartz-mm

muscovite-in-quartz-mm

negative-pyramid-in-spinel-mm

negative-spears-in-quartz-01-mm

dolomite-in-quartz-02-mm

petroleum-in-quartz-01-mm

petroleum-in-quartz-02-mm

pyrite-in-quartz-mm

rusted-rutile-in-quartz-mm

rutile-in-cc-sapphire-mm

rutile-in-quartz

To see more of Sanchez work, or if you’d like to see these shots in higher resolution — as you might imagine, the bigger you get the better with these photos… spectacular details just jump out at you — be sure to visit his website, where you can also buy prints.


Image credits: Photographs by Danny Sanchez and used with permission

31 Jul 20:40

A Towering Turtle of Discarded Industrial Junk Welded by Ono Gaf

by Christopher Jobson

A Towering Turtle of Discarded Industrial Junk Welded by Ono Gaf turtles steampunk sculpture
Photo by Gina Sanderson

A Towering Turtle of Discarded Industrial Junk Welded by Ono Gaf turtles steampunk sculpture
Photo by Gina Sanderson

A Towering Turtle of Discarded Industrial Junk Welded by Ono Gaf turtles steampunk sculpture
Photo by Gina Sanderson

A Towering Turtle of Discarded Industrial Junk Welded by Ono Gaf turtles steampunk sculpture
Photo by Gina Sanderson

Indonesian artist Ono Gaf works primarily with metallic junk reclaimed from a trash heap to create his animalistic sculptures. His most recent piece is this giant turtle containing hundreds of individual metal components like car parts, tools, bike parts, instruments, springs, and tractor rotors. You can read a bit more about Gaf over on the Jakarta Post, and see more of this turtle in this set of photos by Gina Sanderson. (via Steampunk Tendencies)

01 Aug 01:50

El Lado Oscuro lo está pasando mal - También afecta al Lado Oscuro


25 Jul 14:42

Anatomy of Songs [wronghands]





Anatomy of Songs [wronghands]

23 Jul 18:55

Isaac Cordal’s “Cement Eclipses.” Isaac Cordal...









Isaac Cordal’s “Cement Eclipses.”

Isaac Cordal places different miniature statues into his local landscape of Chiapas, Mexico to create an entirely new sense of place once the objects inhabit their chosen situation.  Stories develop organically from the objects and, especially with these skeletal versions, take on a metaphorical prowess to the pleasing street art.  See more below!

Isaac Cordal

Isaac Cordal

Isaac Cordal

Isaac Cordal

Isaac Cordal

Isaac Cordal

Isaac Cordal: Tumblr