Shared posts

28 Aug 17:28

5 plank fence

28 Aug 20:30

Photographer Gives Us an Inside Look at Meghalaya, India, ‘The Wettest Place On Earth’

s_c17_eghala17

New Zealand-based photographer Amos Chapple is a name you might recognize from his intimate look inside Iran that we shared just over a year ago. Today, he’s back on PetaPixel with a series of stunning images from Meghalaya, India — a village known as ‘the wettest place on Earth.’

s_c11_eghala03

In case you’re wondering, that statement is no exaggeration: on average, Meghalaya receives 467 inches of rain per year. And while this makes it a miserable photography location for many reasons, it also makes it one of the most unique places you could possibly shoot.

In order to combat the constant downpours, the laborers of the village wear knups, which are umbrella-type hats made from bamboo and banana leaves that keep the rain from drenching them as they go about their daily routines:

s_c06_eghala13

Another intriguing characteristic of the Meghalaya community is the use of natural bridges. By ‘training’ the roots and branches of trees, villagers have created a vast infrastructure of living bridges that span rivers and more.

As time goes on, these roots continue to develop and grow stronger, making the bridge itself even sturdier… no maintenance required.

s_c01_eghala15

Chapple captures the essence of Meghalaya in an almost cinematic manner, portraying the rain-soaked day-to-day life of the village’s inhabitants in a truly enchanting set of photographs:

s_c13_eghala06

s_c03_eghala07

s_c10_eghala02

s_c18_eghala19

s_c04_eghala04

s_c15_eghala16

s_c09_eghala05

s_c05_eghala12

s_c08_eghala18

s_c02_eghala01

s_c07_eghala21

s_c14_eghala11

s_c12_eghala10

s_c16_eghala23

To keep up with Chapple’s work, check out our previous coverage and then head on over to Facebook and give his page a like.

(via The Atlantic)


Image credits: Photographs by Amos Chapple and used with permission

04 May 17:00

Your Workplace Selfies Are Probably Much More Mundane

25 Aug 18:05

Humorous New Site-Specific Paintings on the Streets of Paris by Pejac

by Christopher Jobson

Humorous New Site Specific Paintings on the Streets of Paris by Pejac street art humor

Humorous New Site Specific Paintings on the Streets of Paris by Pejac street art humor

Humorous New Site Specific Paintings on the Streets of Paris by Pejac street art humor

Humorous New Site Specific Paintings on the Streets of Paris by Pejac street art humor

Humorous New Site Specific Paintings on the Streets of Paris by Pejac street art humor

Humorous New Site Specific Paintings on the Streets of Paris by Pejac street art humor

Humorous New Site Specific Paintings on the Streets of Paris by Pejac street art humor

Street artist Pejac (previously) was recently in Paris where he created at least three new works almost guaranteed to make you smile. The first appears to be a figure throwing a water balloon at a wall, but on closer inspection the giant splat contains a painting of Manet’s famous The Luncheon on the Grass. The second involves a pair of children who appear to be burning ants with a magnifying glass in a spot of sunlight, but once viewed close-up the tiny figures are revealed to be small people instead of insects. Lastly he made use of a thick wall crack to form the edge of a ghostly looking door. You can see a few more views over on StreetArtNews.

24 Aug 16:07

‘Summertime’ Photo Series Captures the Carefree Joys of Summer in the Countryside

Summetime-Photography18-640x426

Summertime is quickly turning into Autumn. Before we know it, the sunshine and green tones that surround us will transform into fiery hues, with plenty of rain and wind to follow. But that hasn’t stopped Polish photographer Izabela Urbaniak from attempting to eternalize the carefree nature of summer in a beautiful black-and-white photo series titled Summertime.

Summertime is born out of the joy of motherhood, as Urbaniak captures her children enjoying the idyllic moments of summer in the tiny Polish village of Lugowiska before they’ve gone. Playing with animals, hopping into ponds, enjoying the peaceful back-and-forth of a tree swing… Urbaniak captures the essence of summer in the most natural of ways.

Summetime-Photography17-640x426

Speaking with Bored Panda about the series, she reveals her inspiration behind the series:

The series is inspired by my own childhood, when I used to visit my grandmother in the summer and spend my school vacations in the countryside. These days, I just love watching kids play in the countryside – my younger son Antek loves to play with his cousins Jas, Maja and Julia. There’s also my lovely Jack Russel terrier Tosia, as well as a cat and some puppies that belong to our neighbors.

The photos, she continues, are the results of “careful observation” and not staged. Captured with a 5D Mark III, 50mm f/1.4 and 85mm f/1.2, she maintains that these are moments as they happened:

Summetime-Photography15-640x426

Summetime-Photography3-640x426

Summetime-Photography5-640x426

Summetime-Photography27-640x426

Summetime-Photography20-640x426

Summetime-Photography8-640x426

Summetime-Photography22-640x426

Summetime-Photography23-640x426

Summetime-Photography21-640x426

Summetime-Photography19-640x426

Summetime-Photography24-640x426

Summetime-Photography10-640x426

Summetime-Photography13-640x426

Summetime-Photography11-640x426

Summetime-Photography6-640x640

Summetime-Photography25-640x426

Summetime-Photography16-640x426

Summetime-Photography2-640x426

Summetime-Photography7-640x426

Summetime-Photography9-640x426

Summetime-Photography1-640x426

Summetime-Photography4-640x426

Summetime-Photography26-640x426

To see more or keep up with her as she continues to create more photography like what you see above, head over to her website by clicking here.

(via Fubiz)


Image credits: Photographs by Izabela Urbaniak and used with permission

20 Aug 16:28

Artist Maskull Lasserre Carves Imagined Skeletons into Souvenir Sculptures and Decoys

by Christopher Jobson

Artist Maskull Lasserre Carves Imagined Skeletons into Souvenir Sculptures and Decoys wood sculpture anatomy
Decoy Study (Duck), 2014. 15 x 5 x 6 inches.

Artist Maskull Lasserre Carves Imagined Skeletons into Souvenir Sculptures and Decoys wood sculpture anatomy
Decoy Study (Duck), 2014. 15 x 5 x 6 inches.

Artist Maskull Lasserre Carves Imagined Skeletons into Souvenir Sculptures and Decoys wood sculpture anatomy
Decoy Study (Duck), 2014. 15 x 5 x 6 inches.

Artist Maskull Lasserre Carves Imagined Skeletons into Souvenir Sculptures and Decoys wood sculpture anatomy
Souvenir Skeleton, 2014. (re-)carved African drummer figure. 10 x 5 x 26 inches.

Artist Maskull Lasserre Carves Imagined Skeletons into Souvenir Sculptures and Decoys wood sculpture anatomy
Souvenir Skeleton, 2014. (re-)carved African drummer figure. 10 x 5 x 26 inches.

Artist Maskull Lasserre Carves Imagined Skeletons into Souvenir Sculptures and Decoys wood sculpture anatomy
Souvenir Skeleton, 2014. (re-)carved African drummer figure. 10 x 5 x 26 inches.

Artist Maskull Lasserre Carves Imagined Skeletons into Souvenir Sculptures and Decoys wood sculpture anatomy
Souvenir Skeleton, 2014. (re-)carved African drummer figure. 10 x 5 x 26 inches.

Artist Maskull Lasserre Carves Imagined Skeletons into Souvenir Sculptures and Decoys wood sculpture anatomy
Shaman Anatomy, 2014. (re-)carved South American shaman bust. 5 x 5 x 20 inches.

Artist Maskull Lasserre Carves Imagined Skeletons into Souvenir Sculptures and Decoys wood sculpture anatomy
Shaman Anatomy, 2014. (re-)carved South American shaman bust. 5 x 5 x 20 inches.

Artist Maskull Lasserre Carves Imagined Skeletons into Souvenir Sculptures and Decoys wood sculpture anatomy
Shaman Anatomy, 2014. (re-)carved South American shaman bust. 5 x 5 x 20 inches.

For his latest body of work, artist Maskull Lasserre acquired a number of souvenir sculptures, the kind found in antique stores or craft fairs that have been mass-produced by anonymous artists, which he then used as a foundation for his own artwork. In a process he refers to as “re-carving,” Lasserre removed details from the artist’s original work to reveal intricate skeletal structures, a process we’ve marveled at numerous times over the last few years here on Colossal. If you happen to be in New York, the pieces are on view for two more days at Junior Projects as part of the Regular JOhn show curated by Jim Lee. You can see many more photos of each piece over in Lasserre’s portfolio. (via Design Milk)

21 Aug 20:00

Creative Retouching Turns Classic Glass Plate Portraits Into Modern Day Fine Art

by DL Cade

costica_7

If you follow PetaPixel, you’re already familiar with the haunting portrait archive of Costica Acsinte. For decades after the end of World War I, Acsinte was possibly the only professional photographer in all of Romania, and the over 5,000 glass plate negatives he left behind are now being painstakingly digitized so that they don’t succumb to the ravages of time.

And as these photographic treasures are digitized, one photographer is plying her retouching skill to turn the black-and-white, somber images into fantasy fine art portraits.

That photographer’s name is Jane Long, and her creative series Dancing with Costica began as a way to brush up on her retouching skills, but it has turned into something more out of the desire to tell a story:

“After finding the Costică Acsinte Archive on Flickr I became fascinated with the images and their subjects,” she tells us. “I wanted to bring them to life. But more than that I wanted to give them a story.”

See if you can guess the story in the photographs below:

costica_1

costica_2

costica_3

costica_4

costica_5

costica_6

“I will probably never know the real stories of these people,” says Long, “but in my mind they became characters in tales of my own invention… star-crossed lovers, a girl waiting for her lover to come home, boys sharing a fantasy, innocent children with a little hint of something dark.”

“Restoring the images,” she continues, “is only part of the process, the rest is the dance.”

To see more of Long’s work, or if you’d like to follow along as she continues to ‘dance’ with Acsinte’s portraits, be sure to visit her website or give her a follow on Flickr and Facebook.


Image credits: Original photographs by Costica Acsinte via Flickr Commons, recreations by Jane Long and used with permission.

21 Aug 00:00

John Kenneth Galbraith

"The only function of economic forecasting is to make astrology look respectable."
11 Aug 16:00

Photo Series Pays Tribute to the Insane Burdens People Around the World Carry on Their Heads

carry

Photographer Floriane de Lassée took a playful approach to the cultural trends of individuals carrying a plethora of objects, balanced on top of their heads. Titled How Much Can You Carry, the series is a tribute to those from remote communities in Bolivia, India and Indonesia who carry immense burdens on their heads as a means to efficiently get objects from one location to another.

Despite the difficult task of balancing and carrying the objects on their heads, the subjects in the photos all seem to have a vibrant sense of pride, with smiles glimmering underneath books, textiles and more. Below are a number of images from the series that Floriane de Lassée was kind enough to share with us.

carry2

carry5

carry6

carry4

carry9

carry7

carry8

To read more about the series and to see Floriane’s other work, you can head over to her website, here.

(via Junk Culture)


Image credits: Photographs by Floriane de Lassée and used with permission

09 Aug 17:20

This Artist Has Put Together an Uber-Creative Diorama Every Day for the Past Three Years

by DL Cade

diorama1

For the past three and a half years, Japanese artist Tanaka Tatsuya‘s daily to-do list has included creating and photographing a miniature diorama. Part of his project Miniature Calendar, you can follow his little miniature figurines through all manner of creative adventures, starting in April of 2011 and still ongoing today.

In fact, the diorama for today, dubbed Deforestation, has already gone live.

diorama21

This project is impressive for any number of reasons: how long he’s kept it up, how well done each of the dioramas are, and how creative he’s gotten with the ‘props,’ just to name a few.

Broccoli for trees, spaghetti for rainfall, camera lenses for factory towers and an unfurled roll of toilet paper for a waterfall are just a few of the creative ideas that Tanaka is still having to this day. And his ideas haven’t gotten less impressive over time, they’ve gotten better.

But don’t take our word for it, scroll down to see some of our favorite Miniature Calendar creations from this past year:

diorama2

diorama3

diorama4

diorama5

diorama6

diorama7

diorama8

diorama9

diorama10

diorama11

diorama12

diorama13

diorama14

diorama15

diorama16

diorama17

diorama18

diorama19

diorama20

To see more of Tanaka’s uber-creative dioramas or buy the Miniature Life photobook he’s put together from the project, head over to his website by clicking here. And if you’d like to keep up with him as he continues to update the Miniature Calendar day-by-day, be sure to give him a follow on Facebook as well.

(via Laughing Squid)


Image credits: Photographs by Tanaka Tatsuya and used with permission

04 Aug 19:55

Photographer’s Unique Layered Prints Show People Melting Into Landscapes

43_tautochronos10small

German photographer Michel Lamoller has created an incredible series of photo collages that depict subjects melting into their environment.

Titled Tautochronos, the series is composed of unique portraits where individuals become camouflaged in the most unusual of ways. Made purely of physical prints, cut with a scalpel and layered neatly before being captured once again, these physical photo manipulations add a strange and unique sense of depth to the scenes depicted.

Below are a number of creations from the series, ranging between 6 to 8 layers of prints.

43_tautochronos 12klein

43_tautochronos13final2klein

43_tautochronos 11small

43_tautochronos 8

43_tautochronos4

43_tautochronos7small

43_tautochronos-IIa

43_tautochronos9_1small

43_Tautochronos-I

43_tautochronos14Nsmall

To check out the full series, head on over to Lamoller’s website.

(via PhotoJoJo)

05 Aug 01:40

Failed panoramic.

01 Aug 15:08

Fun New Murals by ROA Utilize Tunisia’s Domed Architecture

by Christopher Jobson

Fun New Murals by ROA Utilize Tunisias Domed Architecture Tunisia street art murals

Fun New Murals by ROA Utilize Tunisias Domed Architecture Tunisia street art murals

Fun New Murals by ROA Utilize Tunisias Domed Architecture Tunisia street art murals

Fun New Murals by ROA Utilize Tunisias Domed Architecture Tunisia street art murals

Belgian street artist ROA (previously) is currently in Tunisia along with 150 other participating artists for Galerie Itinerrance’s Djerbahood open air museum project in Djerba, Tunisia. The artist cleverly took advantage of the many domed buildings in the city for several of his monochromatic spray paint murals that spread across multiple surfaces. You can see more recent pieces on the Djerbahood website. (via Savage Habit, Street Art News)

30 Jul 20:32

Photomicrographer Captures the Stunning, Jagged Landscapes Inside Gemstones

by DL Cade

biotite-in-Topaz

There is beauty in imperfection. In fact, imperfection might be considered the subject within a subject that photomicrographer Danny Sanchez tirelessly seeks out to create his stunning photography.

Sanchez’s main subjects are gemstones, but the colorful, alien ‘landscapes’ he captures are made up of imperfections called ‘inclusions’ that actually make a gem less valuable. You might say that one gem merchant’s trash is a gem photographer’s treasure.

Sanchez travels to gem shows and digs through bins worth of the precious stones to find the ones that, ironically, nobody actually wants. The ones that have “The stuff inside them.”

clinochlore-in-quartz-mm

Once he’s found the perfect gem, he sets to work putting his eight years of experience to use setting up and capturing his shot… which is, it turns out, extremely challenging because he’s working with razor-thin depth of field.

When we caught up with Sanchez to ask him about the photographs, he was kind enough to outline how one of these pictures comes together:

In microscopy there is little to no depth of field. For photomicrography, this presents tremendous difficulty. Luckily, there are some very helpful mechanisms to help with this problem.

  1. Before anything else – lighting, lighting, lighting. Three continuous light sources, each with their own dual fiber optic light pipes, give me 6 finely focused, intensely bright “light guides”.
  2. A motorized stepping rig. Macro photographers are familiar with linear focusing rigs – this is just a vertical version that can hold a lot more weight. With this, I move 0.025mm at a time and take a photo until I’ve covered the depth I’m looking for. That can be up to 150 photos but usually it’s around 80. Those of you who like math, 80 photos at 0.025mm steps is 2mm depth of field.
  3. Stacking software. Specialized software that will take these 80+ images and render depth. I use Helicon Focus, but there are several fantastic options.

And that description leaves out the prepping of the gem before the shoot, and the Lightroom/Photoshop work after. Make no mistake, each of these gorgeous shots is a labor of love:

dolomite-in-quartz-01-mm

negative-spears-in-quartz-02-mm

fluorite-in-quartz-mm

mountains-in-quartz-mm

muscovite-in-quartz-mm

negative-pyramid-in-spinel-mm

negative-spears-in-quartz-01-mm

dolomite-in-quartz-02-mm

petroleum-in-quartz-01-mm

petroleum-in-quartz-02-mm

pyrite-in-quartz-mm

rusted-rutile-in-quartz-mm

rutile-in-cc-sapphire-mm

rutile-in-quartz

To see more of Sanchez work, or if you’d like to see these shots in higher resolution — as you might imagine, the bigger you get the better with these photos… spectacular details just jump out at you — be sure to visit his website, where you can also buy prints.


Image credits: Photographs by Danny Sanchez and used with permission

31 Jul 20:40

A Towering Turtle of Discarded Industrial Junk Welded by Ono Gaf

by Christopher Jobson

A Towering Turtle of Discarded Industrial Junk Welded by Ono Gaf turtles steampunk sculpture
Photo by Gina Sanderson

A Towering Turtle of Discarded Industrial Junk Welded by Ono Gaf turtles steampunk sculpture
Photo by Gina Sanderson

A Towering Turtle of Discarded Industrial Junk Welded by Ono Gaf turtles steampunk sculpture
Photo by Gina Sanderson

A Towering Turtle of Discarded Industrial Junk Welded by Ono Gaf turtles steampunk sculpture
Photo by Gina Sanderson

Indonesian artist Ono Gaf works primarily with metallic junk reclaimed from a trash heap to create his animalistic sculptures. His most recent piece is this giant turtle containing hundreds of individual metal components like car parts, tools, bike parts, instruments, springs, and tractor rotors. You can read a bit more about Gaf over on the Jakarta Post, and see more of this turtle in this set of photos by Gina Sanderson. (via Steampunk Tendencies)

01 Aug 01:50

El Lado Oscuro lo está pasando mal - También afecta al Lado Oscuro


25 Jul 14:42

Anatomy of Songs [wronghands]





Anatomy of Songs [wronghands]

23 Jul 18:55

Isaac Cordal’s “Cement Eclipses.” Isaac Cordal...









Isaac Cordal’s “Cement Eclipses.”

Isaac Cordal places different miniature statues into his local landscape of Chiapas, Mexico to create an entirely new sense of place once the objects inhabit their chosen situation.  Stories develop organically from the objects and, especially with these skeletal versions, take on a metaphorical prowess to the pleasing street art.  See more below!

Isaac Cordal

Isaac Cordal

Isaac Cordal

Isaac Cordal

Isaac Cordal

Isaac Cordal

Isaac Cordal: Tumblr

20 Jul 18:08

I Died Today, by Duke Roberts

by Guest Author

robyn-arouty-dukey-2014-1

I ate a lot of hamburgers. We had a party.

robyn-arouty-dukey-2014-2

And I laughed.

robyn-arouty-dukey-2014-3

And I thought about how much I’m going to miss it here.

robyn-arouty-dukey-2014-4

We told jokes.

robyn-arouty-dukey-2014-5

We were serious.

robyn-arouty-dukey-2014-7

My friends from next door came to see me. They’re twins. When someone offered them one of my hamburgers, one said, “No thank you. I don’t want to take any from Dukey.”

robyn-arouty-dukey-2014-8

Kristen came to see me. She’s a hoot. She’s my groomer. And my buddy.

robyn-arouty-dukey-2014-9

While we were waiting for the vet to come Kristen said we were going for a walk. Then someone said, “How about a play in the water at the splash park down the street?” So off we went!

robyn-arouty-dukey-2014-10

robyn-arouty-dukey-2014-11

“You know I’m going to miss you, right?”

robyn-arouty-dukey-2014-12

“And you too, right?”

robyn-arouty-dukey-2014-13

“I need you to help me watch over my family.”

robyn-arouty-dukey-2014-14

“Did you hear me? This is all I want!”

robyn-arouty-dukey-2014-15

We got wet today.

robyn-arouty-dukey-2014-17

We smiled today.

robyn-arouty-dukey-2014-18

We felt grateful today.

robyn-arouty-dukey-2014-19

We broke the rules today.

robyn-arouty-dukey-2014-20

I listened to the kids play off in the distance. And thought about my two babies at home. I loved protecting them.

robyn-arouty-dukey-2014-21

I relaxed today.

robyn-arouty-dukey-2014-22

I felt no pain. Even though the tumor grew so big.

robyn-arouty-dukey-2014-23

I felt the love today.

robyn-arouty-dukey-2014-25

I said goodbye to my beautiful friend Kira. She “saw” me standing over everybody before the doctor said it was time. I was excited & jumping & happy.

robyn-arouty-dukey-2014-26

Well, I didn’t say goodbye. I said ’til we meet again.

robyn-arouty-dukey-2014-6

God, I was lucky. Our time was short. But you both gave me a second chance & we lived it up together. You love when I look at you. I’ll never stop.

Always,

DUKEY


About the author: Robyn Arouty is a commercial and portrait photographer based in Houston, Texas. She is an avid proponent in Houston’s dog rescue community, and has raised tens of thousands of dollars for dog rescue groups. Visit her website here and her Facebook page here. This article originally appeared here.


Image credits: All photographs by Robyn Arouty and used with permission

18 Jul 01:50

somethingplayfullywicked: Life in Gaza





















somethingplayfullywicked:

Life in Gaza

28 Jun 18:22

Digital Artist Gets Super Creative with Self-Portrait Series, Shows You How It’s Done

by Gannon Burgett

556ec01d616b6ea9ac289b6fe2a9f719

Are you sick of the standard arm’s-length selfie? Or even the remote-triggered self-portrait? Well, photographer and talented Photoshop artist Martín De Pasquale was, so he turned his self-portraits up to eleven and created some reality-bending images that make that make those bathroom mirror selfies look even dumber.

The above video takes a BTS look at the process that goes into creating these compositions, and as straightforward as it looks at times throughout the demonstration, the amount of Photoshop skill De Pasquale has acquired over years of practice plays a major role in how effortless he makes this look.

Below is a collection of the Argentinian digital artist’s latest works. If you’d like to keep up with him and his conceptual endeavors, you can do so by heading over to his Behance profile:

fd4a1c0e359743be232e943df0810062

f0e471e2c9b144f88b708151987f9920

c0f882226660c06419bccb0d6d932286

aca9b9392755d7380b833271bbc1cd83

174cd40973089cbecf0cf0647982f9b8

3344f896f68ce03d484b2e6788fe5706

f091a28554c220f8ca5573a3272a4f2e

82e47ed52c83b18922081ed758dbff49

40e65acd0efd381ffdaf0d15d5ae4a1f

8ef511effac3fe9bdf5952cb6c73c502

6e3f3e20f1435a89414eb6343820d4e4

6b6bc63962e6c19d9305715ad449c572

6b1bc97651e6d0c9653124e370804628

5a4c1ea38ee60572129cd7180de37e9c

(via Picture Correct)


Image credits: Photographs by Martín De Pasquale and used in accordance with Creative Commons license.

26 Jun 06:29

Colateral

25 Jun 15:23

Whimsical New Murals by Ernest Zacharevic Play with Their Surroundings on the Streets of Malaysia

by Christopher Jobson

Whimsical New Murals by Ernest Zacharevic Play with Their Surroundings on the Streets of Malaysia street art murals Malaysia

Whimsical New Murals by Ernest Zacharevic Play with Their Surroundings on the Streets of Malaysia street art murals Malaysia

Whimsical New Murals by Ernest Zacharevic Play with Their Surroundings on the Streets of Malaysia street art murals Malaysia
Kuching, Borneo, Malaysia

Whimsical New Murals by Ernest Zacharevic Play with Their Surroundings on the Streets of Malaysia street art murals Malaysia
Johor Bahru, Malaysia

Whimsical New Murals by Ernest Zacharevic Play with Their Surroundings on the Streets of Malaysia street art murals Malaysia
Johor Bahru, Malaysia

Whimsical New Murals by Ernest Zacharevic Play with Their Surroundings on the Streets of Malaysia street art murals Malaysia

Whimsical New Murals by Ernest Zacharevic Play with Their Surroundings on the Streets of Malaysia street art murals Malaysia

Artist Ernest Zacharevic (previously) has been quite busy the last few months with stops in Italy and locations around Malaysia where he just finished a month-long residency in Ipoh. He completed several large murals depicting locals and their way of life, but also painted a few of his signature pieces that humorously depict children or animals interacting with elements of buildings or other nearby objects. Above is a collection of pieces stretching back to December of 2013, but for more of his recent work in Malaysia head over to Arrested Motion.

24 Jun 17:23

Vases Constructed from Hundreds of Pencils by Studio Markunpoika

by Christopher Jobson

Vases Constructed from Hundreds of Pencils by Studio Markunpoika wood pencils multiples

Vases Constructed from Hundreds of Pencils by Studio Markunpoika wood pencils multiples

Vases Constructed from Hundreds of Pencils by Studio Markunpoika wood pencils multiples

Vases Constructed from Hundreds of Pencils by Studio Markunpoika wood pencils multiples

Vases Constructed from Hundreds of Pencils by Studio Markunpoika wood pencils multiples

Vases Constructed from Hundreds of Pencils by Studio Markunpoika wood pencils multiples

Vases Constructed from Hundreds of Pencils by Studio Markunpoika wood pencils multiples

Vases Constructed from Hundreds of Pencils by Studio Markunpoika wood pencils multiples

Vases Constructed from Hundreds of Pencils by Studio Markunpoika wood pencils multiples

Vases Constructed from Hundreds of Pencils by Studio Markunpoika wood pencils multiples

Vases Constructed from Hundreds of Pencils by Studio Markunpoika wood pencils multiples

Amalgamated is a new series of vessels by studio markunpoika constructed from assembled pencils. Taking advantage of the pencil’s unique hexagon shape, the pencils are first tightly glued together at each facet to form a solid block. The final pieces are then carved on a machine lathe to reveal the insides of each pencil. Via studio markunpoika:

“Amalgamated” is a collection which explores the relationship of a mass produced ‘tool’ and its individual purpose. The beauty of the pencil as an object seems to go unnoticed if utilised only for their primary purpose. “Amalgamated” is a visual and tactile investigation by using pencils as a raw material. This holistic principle has been the fundament for creating this set of vases; let the pencils become a thing themselves.

The vessels are part of a collaboration between Gallery FUMI and Faber-Castell and were recently on view as part of Design Miami/Basel 2014. (via designboom)

25 Jun 09:51

Instant câlin

(Source + merci à Robin pour la suggestion)

17 Jun 08:57

Daily Overwiew changes your perception of Earth

by Caroline Kurze

Daily Overview is an amazing project that shares one satellite photo from Digital Globes a day in an attempt to change the way we see our planet Earth.

The project was inspired by the Overview Effect, which first described by author Frank White in 1987 as an experience that transforms astronauts’ perspective of Earth and mankind’s place upon it. They’re having a feeling of awe for the planet, a profound understanding of the interconnection of all life, and a renewed sense of responsibility for taking care of the environment.

You can find out more about it in the video below. You can also follow the project via Instagram, Facebook or Tumblr.

All images © Satellite imagery courtesy of Digital Globe | Via: Bored Panda

17 Jun 17:48

Compelling Photos Document the Contents of Abandoned Suitcases from a 125-Year-Old Psychiatric Center

by DL Cade

20120223,894s

Willard Psychiatric Center began its life in 1869 as Willard Asylum for the Insane, closing down over 125 years later in 1995. Thousands of long-term patients passed through its doors, and when the center was shut down, it was discovered that hundreds of suitcases belonging to some of its earliest residents had been set aside and forgotten in one of the hospital’s attics.

Those suitcases and their contents have been preserved, catalogued and, thanks to photographer Jon Crispin and his compelling Willard Asylum Suitcases series, now they have been photographed as well.

Crispin had photographed the old Asylum many times over the past three decades, and so this extension of his documentary work seemed only natural. In March of 2011, he was given access to the preserved suitcases — which are now in the New York State Museum’s permanent collection — and began what he calls “a thorough documentation” of the contents found within.

Anna G Suitcase from Willard Asylum

The series is, in a word, absorbing. Many photo series offer a glimpse into the past, but this is far more intimate than a then-and-now composite or even historical photographs rediscovered in somebody’s attic.

These are personal belongings. Combs, mirrors, medicines and hangers are joined by letters, postcards and, yes, even some old photographs. The photos in the series document all of these things, from the most mundane to the fascinating, arranged with obvious care by Crispin so as to respect the memories of the people the belonging actually belonged to.

“My main concern throughout this project is to maintain a respect for the integrity of the resident’s lives,” he writes in the project’s statement. “And I am determined to tell their stories through my photographs.”

Here is a glimpse at a few of those stories:

Willard Suitcases / Fred B. ©2013 Jon Crispin ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Willard Suitcases / Maude K ©2013 Jon Crispin ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Willard Suitcases / Mary W ©2013 Jon Crispin ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Willard Suitcases / Ernest P. ©2013 Jon Crispin ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

20111028,064s

Willard Suitcases / Raymond H.

20111109,208s

©2011 Jon Crispin ALL RIGHTS RESERVED Willard Suitcases Project / Charles L

Willard Suitcase Project / Mildred H ©2011 Jon Crispin ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Willard Suitcases / Eleanor G ©2013 Jon Crispin ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Willard Suitcases / Lotte J ©2013 Jon Crispin ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Willard Suitcases / Anna B ©2013 Jon Crispin ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

20120209,176s

20120216,140s

Willard Suitcases / Mary R ©2013 Jon Crispin ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

©2012 Jon Crispin ALL RIGHTS RESERVED Willard Suitcases  /  Agnes J

©2012 Jon Crispin ALL RIGHTS RESERVED Willard Suitcases  /  Agnes J

Freda B Willard Suitcase

©2012 Jon Crispin ALL RIGHTS RESERVED Willard Suitcases  /  Anna B. H.

©2012 Jon Crispin ALL RIGHTS RESERVED Willard Suitcases , Mary T

Willard Suitcases  /  Lillian L

Willard Asylum Suitcases ©2012 Jon Crispin ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Willard Asylum Suitcases ©2012 Jon Crispin ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

20120406,210s

20120607,040 copy

Willard Suitcases Projecty ©2013 Jon Crispin ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Willard Suitcases / Delmar H. ©2013 Jon Crispin ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Willard Suitcases / Delmar H. ©2013 Jon Crispin ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Willard Suitcases Project

Willard Suitcases Project

Willard Suitcases Project

Willard Suitcases /

20140204,155ks

When we spoke with Crispin, he thought he had sent us too many photographs from the series. “Pick and choose” he said apologetically. We’ve published them all instead, and don’t regret a single one.

But as many pictures as he sent us (which was definitely not too many or even, perhaps, enough) he kept plenty more to himself. The project began in 2011 and hasn’t been completed yet. More than 400 suitcases were discovered in that attic, belonging to patients who resided at the Asylum from 1910 through 1960, and in March Crispin took to Kickstarter and raised the funds to finish his work.

If you’d like to find out more about the series, visit the Willard Asylum Suitcases website or the already-funded Kickstarter campaign where Crispin describes the work he’s doing. And afterwards, be sure to pay his own photography website a visit as well.

(via Lost At E Minor)


Image credits: Photographs by Jon Crispin and used with permission

06 Jun 06:45

Marlboro

02 Jun 17:16

Mother of Pearl Shell Skull Carvings by Gregory Halili

by Christopher Jobson

Mother of Pearl Shell Skull Carvings by Gregory Halili skulls shells bas relief anatomy

Mother of Pearl Shell Skull Carvings by Gregory Halili skulls shells bas relief anatomy

Mother of Pearl Shell Skull Carvings by Gregory Halili skulls shells bas relief anatomy

Mother of Pearl Shell Skull Carvings by Gregory Halili skulls shells bas relief anatomy

Mother of Pearl Shell Skull Carvings by Gregory Halili skulls shells bas relief anatomy

Mother of Pearl Shell Skull Carvings by Gregory Halili skulls shells bas relief anatomy

Mother of Pearl Shell Skull Carvings by Gregory Halili skulls shells bas relief anatomy

Mother of Pearl Shell Skull Carvings by Gregory Halili skulls shells bas relief anatomy

Born and raised in the Philippines, New Jersey-based artist Gregory Halili is deeply influenced by the vegetation and wildlife he experienced as a child. His latest series of work involves a fusion of the human form with the natural world in these amazing bas-relief shell skulls. Halili carves and then paints with oil on raw, gold-lip and black-lip mother of pearl found in shells collected from the Philippines. The pieces will soon be exhibited at Silverlens Galleries in Manila and Nancy Hoffman Gallery in NYC, but for now you can see much more in this Facebook gallery. (via Junk Culture, Skullspiration)

29 May 22:08

GIF Made with Electron Microscope Zooms In On Life, On Life, On Life

by DL Cade

Screen Shot 2014-05-29 at 4.54.33 PM

No, the title of this post wasn’t written by some sort of broken record robot. It is in fact an accurate description of the GIF below, which was created from photographs taken with a Scanning Electron Microscope.

As the incredibly powerful microscope zooms in, it goes from showing an amphipod (a type of shell-less crustacean), to a diatom (a type of algae) that’s on the amphipod, to a microscopic bacterium that’s on the diatom that’s on the amphipod. It’s life, on life, on life:

The GIF was created by James Tyrwhitt-Drake back in 2012, when he captured the images at the University of Victoria’s Advanced Microscopy Facility and posted the final product to his Tumblog, Infinity Imagined.

Granted, it’s no GIF of a Vine of a Video of a Flipbook of a GIF of a Video of a Roller Coaster… it’s better. That was just an experiment in Meta, this is a photographically and scientifically fascinating learning experience.

But just in case you absolutely need more of an Inception feel, we’ll leave you with the words of Redditor adamwong246, who described the GIF as follows, “There’s a bacterium on a diatom on an amphipod on a frog on a bump on the log in the hole in the bottom of the sea!”

(via Smithsonian via Beautiful/Decay)