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23 Jul 18:55

Isaac Cordal’s “Cement Eclipses.” Isaac Cordal...









Isaac Cordal’s “Cement Eclipses.”

Isaac Cordal places different miniature statues into his local landscape of Chiapas, Mexico to create an entirely new sense of place once the objects inhabit their chosen situation.  Stories develop organically from the objects and, especially with these skeletal versions, take on a metaphorical prowess to the pleasing street art.  See more below!

Isaac Cordal

Isaac Cordal

Isaac Cordal

Isaac Cordal

Isaac Cordal

Isaac Cordal

Isaac Cordal: Tumblr

20 Jul 18:08

I Died Today, by Duke Roberts

by Guest Author

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I ate a lot of hamburgers. We had a party.

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And I laughed.

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And I thought about how much I’m going to miss it here.

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We told jokes.

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We were serious.

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My friends from next door came to see me. They’re twins. When someone offered them one of my hamburgers, one said, “No thank you. I don’t want to take any from Dukey.”

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Kristen came to see me. She’s a hoot. She’s my groomer. And my buddy.

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While we were waiting for the vet to come Kristen said we were going for a walk. Then someone said, “How about a play in the water at the splash park down the street?” So off we went!

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“You know I’m going to miss you, right?”

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“And you too, right?”

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“I need you to help me watch over my family.”

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“Did you hear me? This is all I want!”

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We got wet today.

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We smiled today.

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We felt grateful today.

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We broke the rules today.

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I listened to the kids play off in the distance. And thought about my two babies at home. I loved protecting them.

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I relaxed today.

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I felt no pain. Even though the tumor grew so big.

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I felt the love today.

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I said goodbye to my beautiful friend Kira. She “saw” me standing over everybody before the doctor said it was time. I was excited & jumping & happy.

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Well, I didn’t say goodbye. I said ’til we meet again.

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God, I was lucky. Our time was short. But you both gave me a second chance & we lived it up together. You love when I look at you. I’ll never stop.

Always,

DUKEY


About the author: Robyn Arouty is a commercial and portrait photographer based in Houston, Texas. She is an avid proponent in Houston’s dog rescue community, and has raised tens of thousands of dollars for dog rescue groups. Visit her website here and her Facebook page here. This article originally appeared here.


Image credits: All photographs by Robyn Arouty and used with permission

18 Jul 01:50

somethingplayfullywicked: Life in Gaza





















somethingplayfullywicked:

Life in Gaza

28 Jun 18:22

Digital Artist Gets Super Creative with Self-Portrait Series, Shows You How It’s Done

by Gannon Burgett

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Are you sick of the standard arm’s-length selfie? Or even the remote-triggered self-portrait? Well, photographer and talented Photoshop artist Martín De Pasquale was, so he turned his self-portraits up to eleven and created some reality-bending images that make that make those bathroom mirror selfies look even dumber.

The above video takes a BTS look at the process that goes into creating these compositions, and as straightforward as it looks at times throughout the demonstration, the amount of Photoshop skill De Pasquale has acquired over years of practice plays a major role in how effortless he makes this look.

Below is a collection of the Argentinian digital artist’s latest works. If you’d like to keep up with him and his conceptual endeavors, you can do so by heading over to his Behance profile:

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(via Picture Correct)


Image credits: Photographs by Martín De Pasquale and used in accordance with Creative Commons license.

26 Jun 06:29

Colateral

25 Jun 15:23

Whimsical New Murals by Ernest Zacharevic Play with Their Surroundings on the Streets of Malaysia

by Christopher Jobson

Whimsical New Murals by Ernest Zacharevic Play with Their Surroundings on the Streets of Malaysia street art murals Malaysia

Whimsical New Murals by Ernest Zacharevic Play with Their Surroundings on the Streets of Malaysia street art murals Malaysia

Whimsical New Murals by Ernest Zacharevic Play with Their Surroundings on the Streets of Malaysia street art murals Malaysia
Kuching, Borneo, Malaysia

Whimsical New Murals by Ernest Zacharevic Play with Their Surroundings on the Streets of Malaysia street art murals Malaysia
Johor Bahru, Malaysia

Whimsical New Murals by Ernest Zacharevic Play with Their Surroundings on the Streets of Malaysia street art murals Malaysia
Johor Bahru, Malaysia

Whimsical New Murals by Ernest Zacharevic Play with Their Surroundings on the Streets of Malaysia street art murals Malaysia

Whimsical New Murals by Ernest Zacharevic Play with Their Surroundings on the Streets of Malaysia street art murals Malaysia

Artist Ernest Zacharevic (previously) has been quite busy the last few months with stops in Italy and locations around Malaysia where he just finished a month-long residency in Ipoh. He completed several large murals depicting locals and their way of life, but also painted a few of his signature pieces that humorously depict children or animals interacting with elements of buildings or other nearby objects. Above is a collection of pieces stretching back to December of 2013, but for more of his recent work in Malaysia head over to Arrested Motion.

24 Jun 17:23

Vases Constructed from Hundreds of Pencils by Studio Markunpoika

by Christopher Jobson

Vases Constructed from Hundreds of Pencils by Studio Markunpoika wood pencils multiples

Vases Constructed from Hundreds of Pencils by Studio Markunpoika wood pencils multiples

Vases Constructed from Hundreds of Pencils by Studio Markunpoika wood pencils multiples

Vases Constructed from Hundreds of Pencils by Studio Markunpoika wood pencils multiples

Vases Constructed from Hundreds of Pencils by Studio Markunpoika wood pencils multiples

Vases Constructed from Hundreds of Pencils by Studio Markunpoika wood pencils multiples

Vases Constructed from Hundreds of Pencils by Studio Markunpoika wood pencils multiples

Vases Constructed from Hundreds of Pencils by Studio Markunpoika wood pencils multiples

Vases Constructed from Hundreds of Pencils by Studio Markunpoika wood pencils multiples

Vases Constructed from Hundreds of Pencils by Studio Markunpoika wood pencils multiples

Vases Constructed from Hundreds of Pencils by Studio Markunpoika wood pencils multiples

Amalgamated is a new series of vessels by studio markunpoika constructed from assembled pencils. Taking advantage of the pencil’s unique hexagon shape, the pencils are first tightly glued together at each facet to form a solid block. The final pieces are then carved on a machine lathe to reveal the insides of each pencil. Via studio markunpoika:

“Amalgamated” is a collection which explores the relationship of a mass produced ‘tool’ and its individual purpose. The beauty of the pencil as an object seems to go unnoticed if utilised only for their primary purpose. “Amalgamated” is a visual and tactile investigation by using pencils as a raw material. This holistic principle has been the fundament for creating this set of vases; let the pencils become a thing themselves.

The vessels are part of a collaboration between Gallery FUMI and Faber-Castell and were recently on view as part of Design Miami/Basel 2014. (via designboom)

25 Jun 09:51

Instant câlin

(Source + merci à Robin pour la suggestion)

17 Jun 08:57

Daily Overwiew changes your perception of Earth

by Caroline Kurze

Daily Overview is an amazing project that shares one satellite photo from Digital Globes a day in an attempt to change the way we see our planet Earth.

The project was inspired by the Overview Effect, which first described by author Frank White in 1987 as an experience that transforms astronauts’ perspective of Earth and mankind’s place upon it. They’re having a feeling of awe for the planet, a profound understanding of the interconnection of all life, and a renewed sense of responsibility for taking care of the environment.

You can find out more about it in the video below. You can also follow the project via Instagram, Facebook or Tumblr.

All images © Satellite imagery courtesy of Digital Globe | Via: Bored Panda

17 Jun 17:48

Compelling Photos Document the Contents of Abandoned Suitcases from a 125-Year-Old Psychiatric Center

by DL Cade

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Willard Psychiatric Center began its life in 1869 as Willard Asylum for the Insane, closing down over 125 years later in 1995. Thousands of long-term patients passed through its doors, and when the center was shut down, it was discovered that hundreds of suitcases belonging to some of its earliest residents had been set aside and forgotten in one of the hospital’s attics.

Those suitcases and their contents have been preserved, catalogued and, thanks to photographer Jon Crispin and his compelling Willard Asylum Suitcases series, now they have been photographed as well.

Crispin had photographed the old Asylum many times over the past three decades, and so this extension of his documentary work seemed only natural. In March of 2011, he was given access to the preserved suitcases — which are now in the New York State Museum’s permanent collection — and began what he calls “a thorough documentation” of the contents found within.

Anna G Suitcase from Willard Asylum

The series is, in a word, absorbing. Many photo series offer a glimpse into the past, but this is far more intimate than a then-and-now composite or even historical photographs rediscovered in somebody’s attic.

These are personal belongings. Combs, mirrors, medicines and hangers are joined by letters, postcards and, yes, even some old photographs. The photos in the series document all of these things, from the most mundane to the fascinating, arranged with obvious care by Crispin so as to respect the memories of the people the belonging actually belonged to.

“My main concern throughout this project is to maintain a respect for the integrity of the resident’s lives,” he writes in the project’s statement. “And I am determined to tell their stories through my photographs.”

Here is a glimpse at a few of those stories:

Willard Suitcases / Fred B. ©2013 Jon Crispin ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Willard Suitcases / Maude K ©2013 Jon Crispin ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Willard Suitcases / Mary W ©2013 Jon Crispin ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Willard Suitcases / Ernest P. ©2013 Jon Crispin ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

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Willard Suitcases / Raymond H.

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©2011 Jon Crispin ALL RIGHTS RESERVED Willard Suitcases Project / Charles L

Willard Suitcase Project / Mildred H ©2011 Jon Crispin ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Willard Suitcases / Eleanor G ©2013 Jon Crispin ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Willard Suitcases / Lotte J ©2013 Jon Crispin ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Willard Suitcases / Anna B ©2013 Jon Crispin ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

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Willard Suitcases / Mary R ©2013 Jon Crispin ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

©2012 Jon Crispin ALL RIGHTS RESERVED Willard Suitcases  /  Agnes J

©2012 Jon Crispin ALL RIGHTS RESERVED Willard Suitcases  /  Agnes J

Freda B Willard Suitcase

©2012 Jon Crispin ALL RIGHTS RESERVED Willard Suitcases  /  Anna B. H.

©2012 Jon Crispin ALL RIGHTS RESERVED Willard Suitcases , Mary T

Willard Suitcases  /  Lillian L

Willard Asylum Suitcases ©2012 Jon Crispin ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Willard Asylum Suitcases ©2012 Jon Crispin ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

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Willard Suitcases Projecty ©2013 Jon Crispin ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Willard Suitcases / Delmar H. ©2013 Jon Crispin ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Willard Suitcases / Delmar H. ©2013 Jon Crispin ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Willard Suitcases Project

Willard Suitcases Project

Willard Suitcases Project

Willard Suitcases /

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When we spoke with Crispin, he thought he had sent us too many photographs from the series. “Pick and choose” he said apologetically. We’ve published them all instead, and don’t regret a single one.

But as many pictures as he sent us (which was definitely not too many or even, perhaps, enough) he kept plenty more to himself. The project began in 2011 and hasn’t been completed yet. More than 400 suitcases were discovered in that attic, belonging to patients who resided at the Asylum from 1910 through 1960, and in March Crispin took to Kickstarter and raised the funds to finish his work.

If you’d like to find out more about the series, visit the Willard Asylum Suitcases website or the already-funded Kickstarter campaign where Crispin describes the work he’s doing. And afterwards, be sure to pay his own photography website a visit as well.

(via Lost At E Minor)


Image credits: Photographs by Jon Crispin and used with permission

06 Jun 06:45

Marlboro

02 Jun 17:16

Mother of Pearl Shell Skull Carvings by Gregory Halili

by Christopher Jobson

Mother of Pearl Shell Skull Carvings by Gregory Halili skulls shells bas relief anatomy

Mother of Pearl Shell Skull Carvings by Gregory Halili skulls shells bas relief anatomy

Mother of Pearl Shell Skull Carvings by Gregory Halili skulls shells bas relief anatomy

Mother of Pearl Shell Skull Carvings by Gregory Halili skulls shells bas relief anatomy

Mother of Pearl Shell Skull Carvings by Gregory Halili skulls shells bas relief anatomy

Mother of Pearl Shell Skull Carvings by Gregory Halili skulls shells bas relief anatomy

Mother of Pearl Shell Skull Carvings by Gregory Halili skulls shells bas relief anatomy

Mother of Pearl Shell Skull Carvings by Gregory Halili skulls shells bas relief anatomy

Born and raised in the Philippines, New Jersey-based artist Gregory Halili is deeply influenced by the vegetation and wildlife he experienced as a child. His latest series of work involves a fusion of the human form with the natural world in these amazing bas-relief shell skulls. Halili carves and then paints with oil on raw, gold-lip and black-lip mother of pearl found in shells collected from the Philippines. The pieces will soon be exhibited at Silverlens Galleries in Manila and Nancy Hoffman Gallery in NYC, but for now you can see much more in this Facebook gallery. (via Junk Culture, Skullspiration)

29 May 22:08

GIF Made with Electron Microscope Zooms In On Life, On Life, On Life

by DL Cade

Screen Shot 2014-05-29 at 4.54.33 PM

No, the title of this post wasn’t written by some sort of broken record robot. It is in fact an accurate description of the GIF below, which was created from photographs taken with a Scanning Electron Microscope.

As the incredibly powerful microscope zooms in, it goes from showing an amphipod (a type of shell-less crustacean), to a diatom (a type of algae) that’s on the amphipod, to a microscopic bacterium that’s on the diatom that’s on the amphipod. It’s life, on life, on life:

The GIF was created by James Tyrwhitt-Drake back in 2012, when he captured the images at the University of Victoria’s Advanced Microscopy Facility and posted the final product to his Tumblog, Infinity Imagined.

Granted, it’s no GIF of a Vine of a Video of a Flipbook of a GIF of a Video of a Roller Coaster… it’s better. That was just an experiment in Meta, this is a photographically and scientifically fascinating learning experience.

But just in case you absolutely need more of an Inception feel, we’ll leave you with the words of Redditor adamwong246, who described the GIF as follows, “There’s a bacterium on a diatom on an amphipod on a frog on a bump on the log in the hole in the bottom of the sea!”

(via Smithsonian via Beautiful/Decay)

26 May 18:00

Storyboard Artist Shoots Entertaining Stop-Motion by Inserting Cartoons Into Real Life

by DL Cade

Maybe you’re sick of the “cartoonist/photographer/artist inserts fun characters or images into the real world using forced perspective” thing, and admittedly there have been a lot, but the video above is an example that falls very near the top of the genre’s “best of” list.

Created by storyboard artist Marty Cooper (aka. Hombre McSteez), he uses what’s called Cel Animation — short for Celluloid animation, in which different transparent layers are placed above an opaque background layer so that parts of the animation can be repeated without redrawing everything — to insert cartoon characters of his own creation into the real world.

The characters then interact with their world in fun little stop motion animation sequences that Cooper shoots using his iPhone 5.

The video above is something of a highlight reel that he’s put together from his much more comprehensive portfolio of pictures and animated sequences. To see the rest or follow him as he creates more, check out his Tumblr, Instagram and/or YouTube channel.

(via Engadget)

22 May 19:19

Beautiful Fordite Stones Created from Layers of Automotive Paint are a By-Product of Old Car Factories

by Johnny Strategy
Beautiful Fordite Stones Created from Layers of Automotive Paint are a By Product of Old Car Factories paint jewelry cars automobiles

image via talyer jewelry

Beautiful Fordite Stones Created from Layers of Automotive Paint are a By Product of Old Car Factories paint jewelry cars automobiles

image via flickr user m e sweeney

Beautiful Fordite Stones Created from Layers of Automotive Paint are a By Product of Old Car Factories paint jewelry cars automobiles
image via flickr user nebbie

Beautiful Fordite Stones Created from Layers of Automotive Paint are a By Product of Old Car Factories paint jewelry cars automobiles

image via flickr user m e sweeney

Beautiful Fordite Stones Created from Layers of Automotive Paint are a By Product of Old Car Factories paint jewelry cars automobiles

image via flickr user Sue Kershaw

Beautiful Fordite Stones Created from Layers of Automotive Paint are a By Product of Old Car Factories paint jewelry cars automobiles
image via Fordite.com

Beautiful Fordite Stones Created from Layers of Automotive Paint are a By Product of Old Car Factories paint jewelry cars automobiles

image via flickr user Sue Kershaw

Beautiful Fordite Stones Created from Layers of Automotive Paint are a By Product of Old Car Factories paint jewelry cars automobiles

image via flickr user Sue Kershaw

Beautiful Fordite Stones Created from Layers of Automotive Paint are a By Product of Old Car Factories paint jewelry cars automobiles
image via Fordite.com

Old car factories had a harmful impact on the environment, releasing toxic chemicals into the air, land and water. But it wasn’t all ugly. Oddly enough, one of the by-products of car production was Fordite, also known as Detroit agate. The colorful layered objects take their name from agate stones for their visual resemblance. But instead of forming from microscopically crystallized silica over millions of years, Fordite was formed from layers of paint over several tens of years. Back in the day, old automobile paint would drip onto the metal racks that transported cars through the paint shop and into the oven. The paint was hardened to a rock-like state thanks to high heats from the baking process. As the urban legend goes, plant workers would take pieces home in their lunch pails as a souvenir for their wife or kids.

Since then, car production has modernized and Fordite has been rendered a relic of the past. Artisans have been using the colorful material for jewelry but it’s not a stretch to imagine a future when these pieces sit behind glass in a museum. The colors can also be used to judge how old they are because car paint was subject to different trends. In the 1940s cars were mostly black or brown enamel while the 1960s ushered in an age of colorful lacquers. (via My Modern Met, Fordite.com)

Update: The Michigan State University Museum confirms they have a fordite sculpture in their collection.

21 May 20:06

Surprisingly Emotive Photographs Capture 100-Year-Old Human Bodies Up Close

by Gannon Burgett

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Photographer Anastasia Pottinger‘s recent viral project began when she was offered up an interesting proposition for a photoshoot; one that was very different from what she normally photographs.

Usually, she shoots portraits of babies, young children and families. But this time, the Missouri native was offered the opportunity to photograph a 101-year old woman… nude.

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Pottinger ended up saying yes to the offer, using the opportunity to capture a collection of powerful close-up images of the skin and body of a centenarian. It wasn’t until later, when she was reviewing the images on her computer, that she realized just how special of a subject she had come across.

“I knew I was looking at something very special,” she writes on her website. “It was when I began exhibiting the work that the idea to continue the series was born.”

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Since that first shoot, she has managed to photograph a few more centenarians (who make up just under 2% of the population, according to Genealogy In Time) and turn a strange opportunity into a moving series aptly dubbed Centenarians. But even more fulfilling than the personal joy she’s taken from this series is the response she’s gotten from just about everybody who has seen it:

The response to the images has been remarkable. Viewers are visibly moved by what they are looking at. Whether it’s wondering, “is this what I’m going to look like?” or remembering a loved one — the response seems to be universally emotional on some level.

Below are a few more images from the series, which Pottinger kindly shared with us:

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To see more of Pottinger’s work, be sure to head on over to her website by clicking here. And if you love this series or any of the other work she’s done, be sure to drop a buck or two in the little “tip jar” she has set up.

(via Sploid)


Image credits: Photos by Anastasia Pottinger and used with permission

16 May 17:17

Russian roulette

by CommitStrip

13 May 02:34

Fantastic Fungi: The Startling Visual Diversity of Mushrooms Photographed by Steve Axford

by Christopher Jobson

Fantastic Fungi: The Startling Visual Diversity of Mushrooms Photographed by Steve Axford science nature mushrooms Australia
Marasmius haematocephalus

Fantastic Fungi: The Startling Visual Diversity of Mushrooms Photographed by Steve Axford science nature mushrooms Australia
Panus fasciatus

Fantastic Fungi: The Startling Visual Diversity of Mushrooms Photographed by Steve Axford science nature mushrooms Australia
Leratiomyces sp. / Found in Booyong Reserve, Booyong, NSW

Fantastic Fungi: The Startling Visual Diversity of Mushrooms Photographed by Steve Axford science nature mushrooms Australia
Mycena chlorophos

Fantastic Fungi: The Startling Visual Diversity of Mushrooms Photographed by Steve Axford science nature mushrooms Australia

Fantastic Fungi: The Startling Visual Diversity of Mushrooms Photographed by Steve Axford science nature mushrooms Australia
Cyptotrama aspratum or Gold tuft

Fantastic Fungi: The Startling Visual Diversity of Mushrooms Photographed by Steve Axford science nature mushrooms Australia
Schizophyllum commune

Fantastic Fungi: The Startling Visual Diversity of Mushrooms Photographed by Steve Axford science nature mushrooms Australia
Hairy mycena

Fantastic Fungi: The Startling Visual Diversity of Mushrooms Photographed by Steve Axford science nature mushrooms Australia
White Mycena

Fantastic Fungi: The Startling Visual Diversity of Mushrooms Photographed by Steve Axford science nature mushrooms Australia
Mauve splitting waxcap

Fantastic Fungi: The Startling Visual Diversity of Mushrooms Photographed by Steve Axford science nature mushrooms Australia
Marasmius sp. / Marasmius haematocephalus

Fantastic Fungi: The Startling Visual Diversity of Mushrooms Photographed by Steve Axford science nature mushrooms Australia
panus lecomtei

Fantastic Fungi: The Startling Visual Diversity of Mushrooms Photographed by Steve Axford science nature mushrooms Australia

To think any one of these lifeforms exists in our galaxy, let alone on our planet, simply boggles the mind. Photographer Steve Axford lives and works in the Northern Rivers area of New South Wales in Australia where he spends his time documenting the living world around him, often traveling to remote locations to seek out rare animals, plants, and even people. But it’s his work tracking down some of the world’s strangest and brilliantly diverse mushrooms and other fungi that has resulted in an audience of online followers who stalk his work on Flickr and SmugMug to see what he’s captured next.

Axford shares via email that most of the mushrooms seen here were photographed around his home and are sub-tropical fungi, but many were also taken in Victoria and Tasmania and are classified as temperate fungi. The temperate fungi are well-known and documented, but the tropical species are much less known and some may have never been photographed before. Mushrooms like the Hairy Mycena and the blue leratiomyces have most likely never been found on the Australian mainland before, and have certainly never been photographed in an artistic way as you’re seeing here.

It was painfully difficult not to include more of Axford’s photography here, so I urge you to explore further. All photos courtesy the photographer. (via Awkward Situationist)

12 May 17:07

‘JohnnyExpress’, An Animated Short About a Trouble Causing Space Delivery Man

by Brian Heater

Produced by Korean studio Alfred Imageworks, “JohnnyExpress” is a short 3D animated film that follows Johnny, a space delivery man tasked with delivering one tiny package.

Johnny is lazy and his only desire is to sleep in his autopilot spaceship.When the spaceship arrives at the destination, all he has to do is simply deliver the box. However, it never goes as planned. Johnny encounters strange and bizarre planets and always seems to cause trouble on his delivery route.

The cartoon, set in 2150, quickly escalates into a hilarious monster movie parody.

via Vimeo Staff Picks

16 May 18:09

‘The Five Stages of Inebriation’ As Captured in These Hilarious 19th-Century Portraits

by Gannon Burgett

InebriatedFeature

Called “The Five Stages of Inebriation,” this collection of photographs hilariously depicts, well, just that. From sober but wide-eyed all the way to passed out on the street, this dapper 19th-century gentleman shows off just what type of effects various amounts of alcohol will have on you.

Captured by Charles Percy Pickering back in the 1860s, these are considered to be staged photographs showing off the various stages of drunkenness for use in educational resources directed towards temperance groups.

InebriatedDapperDude_1

Stage 1

InebriatedDapperDude_2

Stage 2

InebriatedDapperDude_3

Stage 3

InebriatedDapperDude_4

Stage 4

InebriatedDapperDude_5

Stage 5

Fun Fact: A rather unique aspect of these prints is that they are albumen print photographs.

Invented by Louis Désiré Blanquart-Evrard in 1850, this technique made use of albumen (literally egg whites) to bind the photosensitive chemicals to the paper where they could then be exposed and developed. Considered the first commercially successful method of producing a print from a negative, this particular print style was prevalent from the time of its invention through the beginning of the 1900s.

(via Huffington Post)


Image credits: Photographs by Charles Percy Pickering courtesy of State Library of NSW

16 May 15:31

Photos from the Early 1900s Prove LOLcats Were Around Long Before the Internet

by Gannon Burgett

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If you thought cat photos were something new, you’d not only be greatly mistaken, you’d be stepping all over the life’s work of one Mr. Harry Whittier Frees.

Born in 1879, this American photographer made his fortune taking photographs of cute kittens and puppies dressed up in human clothes and posed in human environments, which he then turned into postcards, calendars and even children’s books.

These predecessors to the well-known LOLcats memes are as adorable as they are funny, but it didn’t come easy. As explained in his book, Animal Land on the Air, these photographs, “represent an almost inconceivable amount of patience, care and kind attention, as well as a very large number of spoiled films.”

Later in the book, he goes on to say that, “these unusual photographs of real animals were made possible only by patient, unfailing kindness on the part of the photographer at all times.”

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As every photographer has experienced personally, Frees said that some subjects were more photogenic than others:

Rabbits are the easiest to photograph in costume, but incapable of taking many ”human“ parts. Puppies are tractable when rightly understood, but the kitten is the most versatile animal actor, and possesses the greatest variety of appeal.

The pig is the most difficult to deal with, but effective on occasion. The best period of young animal models is a short one, being when they are from six to ten weeks of age. An interesting fact is that a kitten’s attention is best held through the sense of sight, while that of a puppy is most influenced by sound, and equally readily distracted by it. The native reasoning powers of young animals are, moreover, quite as pronounced as those of the human species, and relatively far surer.

According to an article over on One More River, Frees’ animal photos were taken at as low of a shutter speed at 1/5th of a second, meaning that as many as two-thirds of his negatives turned out as useless blurs. And while he seems to be the owner of quite a few cute animals, it’s said that many of his subjects were borrowed from friends, neighbors, breeders and pet shops.

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Although there doesn’t seem to be any conclusive evidence either way, quite a few resources available online say that at least some of his subjects had to be taxidermy pieces. This, of course, would greatly diminish the effort needed to capture such a photograph. So, for now, we suggest you enjoy his photography and take his words with at least a pinch of salt.

If you’re wondering what type of products Frees sold from these photographs, you can actually see for yourself first hand, as you can purchase a few of his books over on Amazon.

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Many of Frees’ photographs are available over on the Library of Congress’ website, so if you’d like to see more, feel free to head on over there and dive through 32 pages of animal adorableness.

For our part, we’ll leave you with a selection of our favorites:

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(via The Atlantic)


Image credits: Photographs by Harry Whittier Frees courtesy of Library of Congress

09 May 00:00

Robert Wilensky

"We've heard that a million monkeys at a million keyboards could produce the complete works of Shakespeare; now, thanks to the Internet, we know that is not true."
07 May 19:17

21 Dreamlike Film Photos by Oleg Oprisco That Will Blow Your Mind

by Michael Zhang

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Oleg Oprisco is a photographer based in Ukraine whose magical, dreamlike photographs have been shared far and wide on the Internet. In an age where realistic photo manipulations are the secret sauce behind impossible images, Oprisco’s work stands out for one simple mind-blowing fact: they aren’t artificial digital manipulations.

You read that correctly. Rather than use clever Photoshopping, Oprisco carefully plans out surreal scenes and shoots them on film. The only Photoshopping that goes into the final images are color adjustments (sometimes a lot of them) and the removal of dust specks from the frame.

Ideas are regularly jotted down into a notebook. Once he decides to turn one of the ideas into an actual shoot, preparing for the shot takes two or three days. Hours upon hours are spent coming up with concepts, creating the costumes and realistic props (e.g. oversized matchsticks, fake butterflies, a stack of fake books), scouting out locations (sometimes pretty dangerous ones), and figuring out hair and makeup.

Each scene starts with a color palette, which guides Oprisco’s choices for each of the elements included in the shot. Outfits and props are either created by hand, or purchased from flea markets and other second-hand sources. Instead of having a team of assistants, Oprisco generally tries to create every element of his shots himself.

The photographs themselves are captured using Kiev 6C (which you can buy used for about $50) and Kiev 88 medium format cameras and a variety of lenses (e.g. 90mm/2.8, 180/2.8, 300/4.0). 12 shots are captured onto each roll of film, and Oprisco is not able to review the photos he captured until he gets the film processed.

Many of Oprisco’s photos are so amazing that you’ll have a hard time believing they weren’t the product of digital trickery.

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Can you figure out what went into each of the shots above? Leave a comment with your answers!

You can find more of Oprisco’s work by visiting his website.

(via 500px and Bored Panda)


Image credits: Photographs by Oleg Oprisco and used with permission

05 May 01:06

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06 May 15:18

9 Amazing Body Painting Photographs by Trina Merry

by Michael Zhang

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Trina Merry is a bodypainting artist based in San Francisco. There’s a good chance you’ve seen her work before, as a number of her projects have enjoyed widespread viral success on the Web.

Her “Human Motorcycle Project” is a series of photographs showing motorcycles created entirely out of painted human bodies.

The images were created to promote the International Motorcycle Roadshow tour, and featured three bikes: a sport bike, a dirt bike, and a cruiser:

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By carefully painting and positioning the models, and from shooting the scene from just the right angle, Merry was able to create something fresh with the already-popular medium of bodypainting photography.

Here’s a behind-the-scenes look at how the motorcycles were created:

While working under body painter Craig Tracy (her teacher and mentor), Merry also helped to create photos of the Fiat 500 out of bodies:

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Here’s a behind-the-scenes vid for that series, which appeared in ESPN’s 2013 “Bodies Issue”:

Merry sometimes captures the final photographs herself, and sometimes works with photographers to turn the visions into reality. In each case, she works closely with the camera to ensure that her painting matches the perspectives of the photographs.

“I love the double-take people do as they look at my work,” she writes.

Other photographs in her portfolio include a tree on a human canvas, a tribute to Jackson Pollock, and a skull tribute to Salvador Dali:

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This is her most recent creation, showing a worshipper in a temple that’s being reflected on water:

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It was actually created with the help of seventeen carefully-painted models:

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You can find more of Merry’s work over in her online portfolio.


Image credits: Photographs used with the permission of Trina Merry

04 May 14:12

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05 May 10:00

Souls

by Wes + Tony

‘’Hey devil, my soul keeps leaving me weird voicemails.’’

How are you supposed to sell your soul?! Everyone makes it look so easy in cartoons, movies, and ancient religious tomes, but in my experience it’s nearly impossible. Here I am with a perfectly decent soul and it’s been a real problem finding a buyer. Apparently the usual way is to say aloud, “I’d sell my soul for a fighter jet!” but that’s not doing it. When you type “soul” into Amazon or eBay you just get a bunch of vinyl records, which is cool and all but I don’t have the musical talent or recording studio access to put my soul onto a 12-track album. Does Satan have a phone number or at least an email address? If he does I bet he uses AOL.

My guess is that the ol’ Dark Lord isn’t buying anymore. He was probably speculating that the price of souls was going to skyrocket when humankind drove itself into extinction from inventing fire and drinking too much mead, but now that we’ve invented BIGGER fires and BETTER mead we’re still going 7 billion strong. Better luck next time, Mr. Devil, I guess that’s why you’re president of the shittier afterlife!

Wes

05 May 19:25

271 Years Before Pantone, an Artist Mixed and Described Every Color Imaginable in an 800-Page Book

by Christopher Jobson

271 Years Before Pantone, an Artist Mixed and Described Every Color Imaginable in an 800 Page Book watercolor history color books

271 Years Before Pantone, an Artist Mixed and Described Every Color Imaginable in an 800 Page Book watercolor history color books

271 Years Before Pantone, an Artist Mixed and Described Every Color Imaginable in an 800 Page Book watercolor history color books

271 Years Before Pantone, an Artist Mixed and Described Every Color Imaginable in an 800 Page Book watercolor history color books

271 Years Before Pantone, an Artist Mixed and Described Every Color Imaginable in an 800 Page Book watercolor history color books

271 Years Before Pantone, an Artist Mixed and Described Every Color Imaginable in an 800 Page Book watercolor history color books

In 1692 an artist known only as “A. Boogert” sat down to write a book in Dutch about mixing watercolors. Not only would he begin the book with a bit about the use of color in painting, but would go on to explain how to create certain hues and change the tone by adding one, two, or three parts of water. The premise sounds simple enough, but the final product is almost unfathomable in its detail and scope.

Spanning nearly 800 completely handwritten (and painted) pages, Traité des couleurs servant à la peinture à l’eau, was probably the most comprehensive guide to paint and color of its time. According to Medieval book historian Erik Kwakkel who translated part of the introduction, the color book was intended as an educational guide. The irony being there was only a single copy that was probably seen by very few eyes.

It’s hard not to compare the hundreds of pages of color to its contemporary equivalent, the Pantone Color Guide, which wouldn’t be published for the first time until 1963.

The entire book is viewable in high resolution here, and you can read a description of it here (it appears E-Corpus might have crashed for the moment). The book is currently kept at the Bibliothèque Méjanes in Aix-en-Provence, France. (via Erik Kwakkel)

02 May 18:16

Some Artists Sign Their Masterpieces, But Nicolas Jolly's Mark is the Art

JollyFingerprints-Lead2.jpg"Averse"

A quick glance at Nicolas Jolly's most recent work and it could be easy to simply write it off as swirling, Van Gogh inspired works of art. By now we all know that there's always much more hidden in the details when it comes to fine art (conceptually or aesthetically) and that spending an extra second investigating is usually worth it—which is exactly the case here. Jolly, a French artist who knows how to make some serious magic happen with India ink—takes thousands of his own fingerprints and creates tenacious works of art. Talk about a signature style.

JollyFingerprints-Detail.jpg"Le Chemin"

JollyFingerprints-Trees.jpg"Les Ombres"

The lines are connected and extended to form finished pieces that languorously pulls the eye through loops created by a natural fingerprint. By switching up the width and length of his fingerprints, Jolly is able to portray different shadows, shapes and light into his work.

(more...)
28 Apr 14:10

Ressonância vegetal

by Janara Lopes

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Sabe o que a ressonância magnética é capaz de fazer com um vegetal?

Ressonância magnética  é uma técnica que permite determinar propriedades de uma substância através do correlacionamento da energia absorvida contra a frequência. Ela usa as transições entre níveis de energia rotacionais dos núcleos componentes das espécies (átomos ou íons) contidas na amostra. Isso dá-se necessariamente sob a influência de um campo magnético e sob a concomitante irradiação de ondas de rádio na faixa de frequências acima citada. – wiki

 

Andy Ellison é um tecnólogo da Universidade de medicina e engenharia biomédica de Boston. E quando não está salvando vidas, ele cria obras de arte com ressonância, no projeto Inside Inside. Olha que demais.

 

Milho

Corn

 

Tomate

Tomato

 

Alho

Garlic

 

Banana

Banana

 

Pêssego

Peach

 

Bambu

Bamboo shoot

 

Morangos

Strawberries

 

Pepino africano

Kiwano (horned melon

 

Romã

Pomegranate

 

Alface

Lettuce

 

Aipo

Celery

 

Melancia

Watermelon[

 

Abacaxi

Pineapple

| via