Shared posts

28 Oct 15:15

13 Delicious Drinks to Make This Halloween

by The Serious Eats Team

Whether you're hosting a Halloween costume party or just sticking around the house handing out Kit-Kats, October 31st calls for a cocktail or two. Read More
28 Oct 21:00

Smooth Criminal Cat

by noreply@blogger.com (Joanne Casey)
14 Oct 20:03

Man Finishes Super Mario 64, GoldenEye 007 & Zelda: OoT in Less Than 1 Hour

by Lambert Varias

So you’ve finished some of your favorite game more times than you can count. You know all the shortcuts and can even finish them in one sitting. What’s your next challenge? If you’re YouTuber KarlJobst, you play and finish three Nintendo 64 games. At once. In under an hour. What.

nintendo 64 three game marathon by karljobstmagnify

Karljobst fired up Super Mario 64, GoldenEye 007 and The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time on three different N64 consoles and TVs, then cycled through the three games as cutscenes played on the other two. Of course, he inevitably let Link, Mario or Bond sit idle from time to time so he could focus on one game. He finished GoldenEye 007 in 21:51, Ocarina of Time in 18:10 and Super Mario 64 (a 16-star run) in 15:44. Don’t believe me? Watch and watch and watch:

I guess the opposite of this would be watching Tarn Adams complete Dwarf Fortress.

[via Digg & Reddit]

06 Oct 04:37

How a movie sex scene actually looks on the set (NSFW)

by Jesus Diaz on Sploid, shared by Jesus Diaz to Gizmodo

How a movie sex scene actually looks on the set (NSFW)

As you could imagine, all those sex scenes that look so hot on the big screen are actually quite awkward while filming. Check out this behind-the-scenes clip of Brooklyn Decker and Patrick Wilson trying to get into it while they get sprayed with fake sweat on the set of Joe Carnahan's movie Stretch.

Read more...








05 Oct 14:23

Unconditional love. [@startribune]



Unconditional love. [@startribune]

05 Oct 19:01

meretricula: AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAS YOUUUUUUUUUUUUU WIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII...





meretricula:

AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAS

YOUUUUUUUUUUUUU

WIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIISH

04 Oct 14:48

Ferrorfluid - The Magnetic Liquid

02 Oct 19:40

Truth about volcanos

29 Sep 17:09

blankthevidya: I just released a demo for Elysis, my top-down...













blankthevidya:

I just released a demo for Elysis, my top-down action-RPG!

Check it out by clicking here

Features

  • 2.7 dungeons with puzzles and treasures.
  • 2 Boss fights.
  • 20+ Weapons / Usable items
  • 30+ Addons
  • 20+ Monsters
  • Customizable controls
30 Sep 04:44

Pretty sweet photo

28 Sep 16:58

adagioformaves: 8-Bit ‘Friends’ by Antonia Heslop



















adagioformaves:

8-Bit ‘Friends’ by Antonia Heslop

29 Sep 15:17

Photo



29 Sep 06:49

Photo



29 Sep 00:46

hateplow: Artemis of the Repostigliosi



hateplow:

Artemis of the Repostigliosi

30 Sep 02:16

Photo



26 Sep 23:39

What Nationality Is Your Dog?

by noreply@blogger.com (Damn Cool Pics)
Do you know what nationality your dog is? Are you unsure? These pictures should help you figure it out.























28 Sep 00:06

Photo



26 Sep 13:04

Vejo o que uma PICK-UP com um motor de 800hp é capaz de fazer

by Izzy Lulz

Um piloto conhecido como BJ aceitou a aposta do milionário Dan Bilzerian de atravessar uma cidade mexicana em determinado tempo usando uma Pick-up de 800 cavalos de potência para promover a marca Monster Energy. Se liguem no show que essa máquina proporciona:

Eu não sei quanto custa e nem como vou usar, MAS EU PRECISO DESSE VEÍCULO!

Vi lá no Testosterona Sports.

21 Sep 23:00

Americans Taste Test Weird Limited Edition Oreo Flavors

by tastefullyoffensive.com
17 Sep 16:45

Doutor Google

by ninja amarelo

dor-de-cabeca

Foi assim que descobri que estou grávido de 3 meses, só acho estranho a barriga não crescer e eu não ter ppk, mas estou muito contente

The post Doutor Google appeared first on Le Ninja.

16 Sep 19:00

Super Mario vs. Mortal Kombat: Finish Them

by Shane McGlaun

Video games are a bit like comic books in the sense that at some point most gamers have sat around talking about who would win if a fight broke out between characters from this game and that game. One video game beat down I have never thought about is Super Mario World vs. Mortal Kombat.

mortalkmagnify

That is a mash-up that seems very biased towards the Mortal Kombat killers. After all, MK fighters get those awesome fatalities. There is nothing quite like seeing cute Mario characters dispatched violently by Scorpion and Shang Tsung.

Everything seems to be going along normally until morphing character Shang Tsung pops up and starts to dominate and decimate the Mushroom Kingdom. Check out the videos to see all the mashup action in full effect.

[via Kotaku]

13 May 13:45

Spot-on chainsaw impression

by Abraham

(via Reddit)

16 Sep 11:43

A War Photographer Embeds Himself Inside a Video Game

The Last of Us Remastered is a post-apocalyptic video game released earlier this year on PlayStation 4 with an in-game Photo Mode, which freezes the game and lets players shoot, edit and share photographs of their achievements.

TIME assigned conflict photographer Ashley Gilbertson to use the Photo Mode to document the game’s protagonists as they fight to survive in a zombie-infested world. Gilbertson writes about his experience.

I’ve spent a few days inside the body of an angry Hugh Jackman-lookalike.

TIME asked me to work as a photographer within the video game called The Last of Us Remastered, a hyper violent game in which a player must kill people that are infected with some type of brain and flesh condition. The game, which is very carefully rendered to look as real as possible, gives the player access to a wide variety of weapons, but it also provides players with a camera to shoot their own action. I loved the concept – it brought to mind the ideas of photojournalism produced without a physical camera, best embodied in Mishka Henner’s brilliant series, No Man’s Land, a project that uses Google Street View to document Europe’s prostitution issues.

My approach with The Last of Us Remastered was to enter each situation, or level, and work the scene until I was confident I’d gotten the best photograph I could before moving on. It’s the same way I work in real life. Yet, I found it was more difficult to do in a virtual reality because I was expected to fight my way through these levels to get to the next situations. That involved chopping off people’s heads, shooting them point blank in the face or throwing bombs near them. If I failed, I’d have my neck bitten, with blood exploding from my jugular in some pseudo-sexual zombie move, forcing me to restart the level.

I initially played the game at home. But after a short time playing it, I noticed I was having very strong reactions in regards to my role as the protagonist: I hated it. When I covered real war, I did so with a camera, not a gun. At home, I’d play for 30 minutes before noticing I had knots in my stomach, that my vision blurred, and then eventually, that I had simply crashed out. I felt like this could well be my last assignment for TIME.

Call me soft, but I’m pretty sure it was my brain being overwhelmed and shutting my body down. It sounds extreme perhaps, but I’m wired that way.

So, I moved to the TIME offices where Josh Raab, a contributing photo editor at Time.com and a former gamer, could take the controls and fight his way through the different stages for me. Josh developed a particular style of clearing levels – sneaking up on infected people, strangling them for a while and then stabbing them in the neck. I’d then retake the controls, letting me act more like a photographer. That’s when I started to make better images – the whole experience resembled an actual embed, with someone doing the fighting and me taking photographs.

In a day of combat in Iraq, I’d generally file between eight and 10 photographs per day. I figured I could do the same thing with this assignment. I was wrong. In combat, I need to be in position, prepared for a shot, and I’ve only got hundredths of a second to make it before the situation changes and I have to move on. There’s one moment, one frame. Within the game, I could freeze time. I had unlimited time to experiment and find my shot using different angles, depths of field, exposure, grain, vignettes and lenses. The zen approach to how I work in the field is lost within a gaming console. There, I had the opportunity to second-guess myself every time I hit pause.

An additional challenge was that I could make photographs that seemed almost “perfect”. It wasn’t hard to make images that recalled posters for a war film, or that might be used in an advertising campaign for the game itself.  It was too clean. The last thing I wanted to do was to advertise the game, so I tried to mess with the photos a little. Put unimportant information in the foreground. Tilt the camera. Pull back too wide. I needed to make the shots imperfect because, I believe, imperfections make photography human. In advertising things look perfect. In journalism, there’s always something off. What some people see as visual weaknesses in our work, I see as part of our tableau.

The Last of Usª Remastered_20140905150653

Ashley Gilbertson for TIME

"I found another [image] that reminded me of Michelangelo’s Pietà."

I seek particular scenes when I work, and playing the game, I found myself doing the same thing. I’d gravitate towards darker situations, or spots with slivers of light, both environments I love to shoot on the field. I found one scene that reminded me of Paolo Pelegrin’s Lebanon image when I switched it to black-and-white. I found another (above) that reminded me of Michelangelo’s Pietà. I shot through a dirty window at one point (below) trying to emulate the refugee-in-bus-window-at-border-crossing image, but the subject, my virtual daughter, didn’t have the required expression of distress.

The Last of Usª Remastered_20140904153950

Ashley Gilbertson for TIME

"I shot through a dirty window at one point trying to emulate the refugee-in-bus-window-at-border-crossing image, but the subject, my virtual daughter, didn’t have the required expression of distress."

None of the game’s characters show distress, and that to me was bizarre – it’s a post apocalyptic scenario, with a few remaining humans fighting for the survival of their race! To be successful, a player must be the perpetrator of extreme, and highly graphic, violence. I’m interested in a more emotionally engaged type of photography, where the human reaction to a scene is what brings a story to life. That was tough inside this game. Occasionally the characters show anger, though generally they’re nonchalant about the situation they’ve found themselves in. In the end, their emotions mimicked that of the zombies they were killing.

By the time I finished this assignment, watching the carnage had became easier.

Yet, I left the experience with a sense that by familiarizing and desensitizing ourselves to violence like this can turn us into zombies. Our lack of empathy and unwillingness to engage with those involved in tragedy stems from our comfort with the trauma those people are experiencing.

It’s the single largest issue I face as a photographer. How do we reach a readership that is accustomed to seeing people dying en masse in war zones as a result of games like this one? I’ve been trying to find alternative approaches to the topic for the past seven years, with limited success – the work I’m most proud of, Bedrooms of The Fallen, was just published as a book. It examines the intact bedrooms of soldiers killed overseas.

I came away from the experience having learnt a couple of things: that the work I usually do is an antidote to the type of entertainment this game represents and that I suck at video games.

Ashley Gilbertson in the TIME Studio playing The Last of Us

Josh Raab

Ashley Gilbertson in the TIME Studio playing The Last of Us

Ashley Gilbertson is a conflict photographer represented by VII Photo and based in New York. His latest book Bedrooms of The Fallen was featured on LightBox in May. Follow him on Instagram and Twitter @ashgilbertson.

Josh Raab is a contributor to TIME LightBox. Follow him on Instagram @instagraabit

09 Sep 06:33

Documentary chronicles the sounds of console gaming's early years

by Timothy J. Seppala
When it comes to video games, more often than not audio gets the short shrift because, well, you can't see music in a screenshot. It's with that in mind that Red Bull (yes, that Red Bull) is putting together a documentary series about the scene...
08 Sep 19:06

Filha perde aposta milionária para o pai

by Junior

QWE

O pai, Tim Bower, tava arremessando uma bolas quando foi desafiado pela sua filha que disse: "Se acertar esse arremesso (de costas), você nunca mais precisa pagar mais nada por qualquer coisa que eu queira". E o anjo da guarda das carteiras dos pais fizeram o resto.
C A G A D A !!!!

O post Filha perde aposta milionária para o pai apareceu primeiro em Sedentário & Hiperativo.

07 Sep 19:45

Dealing pot in public

05 Sep 00:56

Seeing skateboard tricks in slow motion is like breaking gravity

by Casey Chan on Sploid, shared by Casey Chan to Gizmodo

Seeing skateboard tricks in slow motion is like breaking gravity

Slow down these skateboard tricks all you want and it's still damn impressive how skateboarders can make a board twist and bend exactly how they want it. It's like there are invisible strings attached to the board or a hole to exploit in gravity. But it's just a beautiful ballet of footwork.

Read more...








05 Sep 03:25

Offensive Joke

30 Aug 20:40

Still problems to Tie a Tie?

25 Aug 20:00

Tourists Definitely Deserve This One

Tourists Definitely Deserve This One

Submitted by: (via poppzE)