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16 Sep 19:40

We've Come a Long Way With Free Music and U2

We've Come a Long Way With Free Music and U2

Submitted by: (via rapcatmixer)

Tagged: u2 , Music , iTunes , piracy , free stuff
13 Sep 18:44

Give it Up: Composer ‘Kutiman’ Creates Entirely New Song Using 23 Videos of Other Musicians

by Christopher Jobson

Give it Up is a new track released yesterday by Israeli musician and composer Kutiman. The song was created entirely using vocal and instrument tracks lifted from 23 different YouTube videos of mostly amateur musicians, credited here. If you liked this, you’ll be happy to learn this is just the first track off his upcoming album Thru You Too which the artist says will be comprised entirely of unrelated YouTube videos.

In other composing-music-with-videos news, Andrew Huang created a version of the 80s hit 99 Red Balloons… using only red balloons. Included here for your listening pleasure.

(via Adam Savage)

16 Sep 21:20

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16 Sep 18:45

Joe Rogan is absolutely the f**king man

17 Sep 06:10

We Keep Going Back To Crab City

by jon

2014-09-17-We-Keep-Going-Back-To-Crab-City

It’s another fine day in Crab City — a fine day for murder.

I’m thinkin’ there’ll be at least one more day of this arc, possibly more — going to figure it out as I go.

Are you enjoying the strip? Please consider becoming a Patreon patron! A buck or more a month from you helps keep the comics flowing.

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16 Sep 18:05

PayPal Takes Out NY Times Ad To Taunt Apple Over Security Issues

by Laura Northrup
Bewarethewumpus

I'm calling it less than a month before we hear about a paypal data breach.

applepayIf you ran a large and prosperous online payments company, you might feel threatened by Apple’s announcement that they’ will start their own mobile payments service, called Apple Pay. Not PayPal, though. Nope. Paypal isn’t scared. In fact, PayPal has started taunting Apple over security issues, mocking the company over the recent public dump of nude celebrity self-portraits that had been stolen and circulated online.

It is rather odd that two Internet companies are taking out ads in a newspaper, but makes sense when you think about it: nobody looks at online banner ads.

Here’s the full-page color ad, originally put online by PandoDaily:

paypal-e28093-we-the-people-ad

Of course, Apple wants users to know that its systems weren’t breached during the global selfie crisis: baddies gained access to photos never meant for the public through social engineering, most likely guessing at answers to password reset questions such as the account holder’s birthday or the name of the elementary school they attended. (See, there’s a good reason for entertainers to lie about their ages.) Keeping accounts secure is important, but at the same time no online service wants to be so secure that it’s onerous for users to log in. Eventually, they’ll stop bothering.

PayPal surely won’t be the first competitor to mock Apple. Congress wants to learn more about how the attacks happened, and Apple CEO Tim Cook has promised that the company will put more safeguards in place to keep strangers from changing your password behind your back.

No online service will ever be immune to human greed or human stupidity. Baddies try to get PayPal customers’ data all of the time.

“We the people want our money safer than our selfies.” PayPal goes after Apple in a full page NYT ad [PandoDaily]

15 Sep 04:34

Secret Law is Not Law

by Cory Doctorow

The Electronic Frontier Foundation's Cindy Cohn is on fire: "Let’s be clear: Under international human rights law, secret “law” doesn’t even qualify as 'law' at all."

The US Government and agencies like the DEA, NSA, TSA and FBI conduct mass-scale domestic surveillance on the basis of laws whose interpretations are held to be state secrets and matters of national security. From No-Fly lists to the FISA court, the US has adopted the principle that you are not allowed to know the law, but if you break it, you will be punished under it.

The essay commemorates the anniversary of the adoption of the 13 Necessary and Proportionate Principles, a widely supported charter setting out the legitimate basis for law enforcement, surveillance and respect for human rights.

The breadth of the secret law is astonishing. For instance, only after the Snowden revelations did the government first admit its legal theories -- that its mass spying relied on outrageous secret interpretations of section 215 of the PATRIOT ACT and section 702 of the FISA Amendments Act -- neither of which even mentions mass surveillance much less authorizes it. We also now know about the NSA’s domestic telephone records collection and a past program that collected cell location information but we still don’t know the NSA’s full use of section 215. In fact, on September 2 the government sidestepped questions from the Second Circuit about whether its legal arguments in support of its telephone records collection could also support the mass collection of all credit card or bank records of Americans (hint: it could).

Nor are these secret, often extremely weak interpretations of otherwise public laws the only problem. Sometimes there’s no “law” at all. The NSA’s foreign collection processes, which are much more extensive than their domestic collections, are only ostensibly justified by an Executive Order, currently Executive Order12333. While E.O. 12333 is public, it’s not law at all and it certainly does not mention mass surveillance of millions of innocent people around the world. None of the government’s legal interpretations of it are public either. We've now seen evidence that this non-law with secret interpretations is the basis for the NSA's mass surveillance of communications not just in one place, but at nearly every step of their journey: from remote access to computers, to man-in-the-middle attacks on messages in transit, to attacking direct service providers like Google, to tapping into the undersea cables. Yet the legal basis for these unprecedented intrusions into privacy remains opaque.

13 Principles Week of Action: Secret Law is Not Law [Cindy Cohn/EFF]

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Scottish readers: Undecided about the referendum? Please read Scottish Independence, Power And Propaganda.

17 Sep 00:01

A man named Bunny Boots Ink makes "First Amendment Test" videos

by Matthew Williams
Bewarethewumpus

Four guys to harass one. That's good work there, boys.

"Ever wonder what would happen when you get confronted by MP's and military investigation unit outside of the base and don't say much to them?" -- Bunny Boots Ink

A YouTube user calling himself "Bunny Boots Ink" tests the First Amendment by filming government installations, employees, and proceedings.

In this video, he stands on a public sidewalk and films a jet on display outside an Air Force base in Alaska. When military police and local cops interrogate him, he asserts his 5th Amendment privilege, and after he leaves, an unidentified man follows him for several miles.

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Scottish readers: Undecided about the referendum? Please read How the media shafted the people of Scotland and Scottish Independence, Power And Propaganda.

16 Sep 21:45

Reading Rainbow Story Time: LeVar Burton Reads 'Nina Nandu's Nervous Noggin'

by tastefullyoffensive.com
Bewarethewumpus

Man, I'm just stoked that kids get new Reading Rainbow episodes. I grew up on that stuff, and anything that gets kids reading is a good thing by my estimation.

16 Sep 02:18

US fines over data requests would have destroyed Yahoo in a year

by Jon Fingas
The US government's threat that it would fine Yahoo $250,000 per day back in 2008 was bad enough by itself, but declassified documents show that the penalties could easily have been much, much worse. Marc Zwillinger and Jacob Sommer (who were on...
17 Sep 04:00

My Phone is Dying

When it explodes, it will cast off its outer layers, leaving behind nothing but a slowly fading PalmPilot, calculator, or two-way pager.
14 Sep 17:13

Shorter X

by Molly Horan
A7b

Sometimes boiling down a movie or book to a few sentences can have amusing results.

29 Aug 18:02

Photographer Thomas Herbrich Took 100,000 Smoke Plume Photos Looking for Unexpected Shapes

by Christopher Jobson

Photographer Thomas Herbrich Took 100,000 Smoke Plume Photos Looking for Unexpected Shapes smoke

Photographer Thomas Herbrich Took 100,000 Smoke Plume Photos Looking for Unexpected Shapes smoke

Photographer Thomas Herbrich Took 100,000 Smoke Plume Photos Looking for Unexpected Shapes smoke

Photographer Thomas Herbrich Took 100,000 Smoke Plume Photos Looking for Unexpected Shapes smoke

Photographer Thomas Herbrich Took 100,000 Smoke Plume Photos Looking for Unexpected Shapes smoke

Photographer Thomas Herbrich Took 100,000 Smoke Plume Photos Looking for Unexpected Shapes smoke

Photographer Thomas Herbrich Took 100,000 Smoke Plume Photos Looking for Unexpected Shapes smoke

Photographer Thomas Herbrich Took 100,000 Smoke Plume Photos Looking for Unexpected Shapes smoke

Over the last three months photographer Thomas Herbrich snapped some 100,000 individual photographs of smoke, looking for unexpected anamalies and fortuitous coincidences where familiar shapes emerged. It’s fascinating to see how the brain tries to create order out of chaos, just like looking up at the clouds, suddenly familiar patterns seem to stand out: faces, hands, or scrolls of paper. After carefully sifting through each image Herbrich selected 20 final shots for this series, aptly titled, Smoke. These are a few of our favorites, but you can see the rest here.

Update: Apparently the psychological phenomenon of seeing images or recognizing patterns in random images/data is called pareidolia. Thanks, Sam!

11 Sep 22:00

The Rise And Fall Of Nintendo... As A Rock Band

by Nathan Grayson

Link as a European EDM legend. Wario's dumb laugh. Mario's sex tape and drug addiction. Skater Mega Man. Bowser's tiny puppy. Peach's pop career. The band going viral. Rolling Shell Magazine. Yoshi gets an island. Yoshi gets an island. This video is perfect.

I'm not often prone to straight out gushing, but this video re-imagining Mario, Luigi, Donkey Kong, Link, and more as the story of a rock band's meteoric rise and drug-fueled fall is incredible. So clever, so spot-on, so many great cameos and references. Man. This just made me so happy.

If Nintendo's world was a VH1-friendly rock fantasy, this would be it. All the actors nail the look and feel of their parts, and this video weaves so many Nintendo tropes into a band story in a way that actually makes sense.

The craziest part? The video is by a band called Patent Pending, so they also released an entire EP of the music used in the video. It's... kinda good! Definitely catchy, amusingly cliched, and one of the songs has more consecutive uses of the word "bro" than I've ever heard in a single three minute span—all of which makes sense given the context.

Watch it. I know it's a little lengthy, but pull up a chair, get comfortable, and prepare yourself for fully serious lines like, "You don't understand what it's like to look back and realize you tornado punched your own brother. I've gotta live with that." So good.

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12 Sep 23:40

FCC Gets Record Volume of E-mail Complaints

by Brad
6c5

Yesterday’s protest set a new record for bringing more than 1.5 million comments in advocacy of net neutrality to the Federal Communications Commission’s inbox, the highest volume of e-mail complaints the U.S. federal agency has ever received in a single day since Janet Jackson’s “wardrobe malfunction” during the 2004 Super Bowl halftime show.

12 Sep 09:45

Impossible GTA V Flying Has to Be Seen to Be Believed

by Leon Hurley

Impossible GTA V Flying Has to Be Seen to Be Believed

YouTuber Mario4LYF3 seems to have a different kind of gravity in GTA V to the rest of us as they put their jet through some incredible moves in this video.

This post originally appeared on Kotaku UK.

The grasp they have of how the game's gravity works is incredible here as they use stalls and gently tweaked thrusts to pull off some incredible stunts, flying through buildings, upside down under freeways and generally floating around like they were born with those wings. (Via Rockstar)


Impossible GTA V Flying Has to Be Seen to Be Believed

This post originally appeared on Kotaku UK, bringing you original reporting, game culture and humour with a U from the British isles. Follow them on @Kotaku_UK.

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11 Sep 21:03

The NSA Was Going to Fine Yahoo $250K a Day If It Didn't Join PRISM

by Robert Sorokanich

The NSA Was Going to Fine Yahoo $250K a Day If It Didn't Join PRISM

When we first learned about NSA metadata collection, we wondered how readily the biggest tech companies acquiesced to the government. Today we start to find out. This is the story of how Yahoo was coerced into PRISM, as told by court documents cited by the Washington Post today.

Read more...

11 Sep 16:51

Who's Faster: Superman or The Flash?

by Brad
Fb4

In this latest animated sketch from Dorkly, the Flash learns an important lesson about the physics behind Superman’s superpower.

09 Sep 15:14

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10 Sep 05:33

Today is #InternetSlowdown Day

by Cory Doctorow

The FCC heard from so many Americans who want an Neutral Net that its website crashed. More than a million people told the FCC not to put the cable companies in charge of the Internet -- less than one percent of commenters opposed Net Neutrality.

Despite the astroturfers who compared a fair Internet to Communism, messages like the scathing John Oliver rant have carried the day in the court of public opinion.

But will it convince the FCC? Will Tom Wheeler, who used to run the cable lobbyists before he became FCC Chairman, listen to his golf buddies and former colleagues, or to the people he has sworn to serve? Will the FCC be shamed into doing the thing that we all know is right?

Well, that's up to us.

Today is #InternetSlowdown Day. It's the day that people all over the Internet show Washington what kind of world they're trying to make -- a world of bland, cable company fuckery, where the thing that determines your success on the Internet is how well your sales force sells the cable company on the premium carriage contract -- not whether you're making something that people love and want to see.

The net neutrality campaign smashed every FCC comment record. Now we're going to do it again.

Visit https://www.battleforthenet.com/sept10th/, and get the tools you need to participate: swell avatars for your social media uses, banners and dialog boxes you can install on your site -- everything you need to help boost the net neutrality campaign from millions to tens of millions of people pledging their support for the Web we all want.

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09 Sep 16:45

Infographic: Results after legalizing pot in Colorado

10 Sep 04:00

On the Phone

'No idea what I was thinking! Haha! But anyway, maybe we should check out what this Ba'al guy has to say.'
09 Sep 15:52

Baristas Are Misspelling Your Name on Purpose

by Molly Horan
22a

This sketch suggests the name on your Starbucks cup might be intentionally far from the name you actually gave.

09 Sep 22:09

Report: Microsoft Trying To Buy Mojang, Creators Of Minecraft

by Luke Plunkett

Report: Microsoft Trying To Buy Mojang, Creators Of Minecraft

The Wall Street Journal is reporting that, according to "a person with knowledge of the matter", Microsoft is in "serious discussions" to buy Mojang, the studio that made smash hit Minecraft.

The deal is reported to be worth a whopping $2 billion, and "could be signed as early as this week".

We've contacted both Microsoft and Mojang for comment, and will update if we hear back.

It's worth remembering that in June this year, Mojang founder Markus Persson wrote in a blog post:

Mojang does not exist to make as much money as possible for the owners. As the majority shareholder, I'd know. Every time a big money making deal comes up that would make a lot of money, it's of course very tempting, but at the end of the day we choose to do what either makes the most sense for our products, or the things that seem like fun for us at Mojang.

Microsoft Near Deal to Buy Minecraft Maker Mojang [WSJ]

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09 Sep 14:00

GoldenEye Watch Face Makes Me Really Want A Smartwatch

by Mike Fahey

GoldenEye Watch Face Makes Me Really Want A Smartwatch

Thank goodness for hungry children, because if not for them I'd be blowing $250 on a Moto 360 right now for no other reason than to load it with the watch face from GoldenEye 007.

Android enthusiast site Phandroid brings this snappy GoldenEye watch face to light. Dubbed the "Secret Agent Watchface" by its creator on Google Play, it uses the iconic Health and Armor bars from the classic Nintendo 64 game to meter battery charge. From what I've read about the Moto 360 so far, that means those bars will deplete really fast.

If you aren't interested in buying a dubious piece of hardware that's very likely going to look like a crappy toy in a few hours (it's Apple conference day!), watch the video Phandroid shared of ten minutes of paused GoldenEye is a suitable substitute.

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08 Sep 00:36

Reminder: The Game Boy Was Almost Indestructible

by Luke Plunkett
Bewarethewumpus

I've dropped my brick down flights of concrete stairs, and it still works like a champ.

Reminder: The Game Boy Was Almost Indestructible

Yes, a Game Boy survived a bombing raid. But as famous as that story is, who's to say it wasn't a fluke? So Wired got Nintendo's old handheld and did some slightly more scientific study on it.

I say slightly because that test involved dropping it a couple of times then having a giant man smash one with a sledgehammer.

Which isn't very scientific at all, but while the hammer was entertaining, that 15-foot drop was impressive. I've dropped phones - made from all kinds of modern, advanced composites and materials not even used in 1989 - from 1/4 of that distance and had them almost disintegrate. Yet the Game Boy was almost unscathed.

Nintendo Gameboy vs. Sledgehammer - WIRED's Battle Damage [Wired]

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09 Sep 14:29

Duck Tales Opening with Actual Ducks

by Don
Bewarethewumpus

Woo-ooh.

D26

The Oh My Disney YouTube channel recreated the entire opening sequence from late 1980’s animated television series Duck Tales using real ducks.

09 Sep 15:45

New wind-tunnel tests find surprising gains in cycling efficiency from leg-shaving

by Cory Doctorow

A 1987 wind-tunnel trial established that leg-shaving was basically useless, used a miniature leg-model with hair glued to it for its control; when the experiment was re-run this year with a human leg, the savings were a whopping seven percent.

Writing in Triathlete, cyclist Jesse Thomas describes his experiences re-running the leg-hair trials. A subsequent trial of five more cyclists confirmed the findings.

As the Globe and Mail's Alex Hutchinson points out, this contributes to the burgeoning case for confirming the results of classic experiments, a practice that is largely discouraged, with many of the major journals being closed to reports on confirmation experiments.

The problem in the research community is that scientists have little incentive to duplicate earlier work just to check if it’s correct. Many journals have explicit policies forbidding the publication of work that attempts to replicate previous experiments. In contrast, when the journal Social Psychology devoted a special issue earlier this year to attempts to replicate 27 “important findings” in the field, 10 findings could not be reproduced.

In this case, Cote contacted Kyle, the author of the earlier study, to ask if he had any ideas about the discrepancy between the two results. It turned out that the 1987 test involved a fake lower leg in a miniature wind tunnel with or without hair glued onto it – hardly a definitive test, and yet it was enough to persuade most people not to bother with further tests for the next three decades.

The revised results should remind us not to place too much faith in any single experiment, and to consider all findings tentative until replicated – including the new shaving findings.

The curious case of the cyclist’s unshaven legs [Alex Hutchinson/Globe and Mail]

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08 Sep 07:00

Invasive Installation

by John
Bewarethewumpus

Via Yousef Alnafjan

Invasive Installation

03 Sep 16:02

jessehimself: Pennsylvania Judge Sentenced For 28 Years For...

Bewarethewumpus

Via Lori



jessehimself:

Pennsylvania Judge Sentenced For 28 Years For Selling Kids to the Prison System

Mark Ciavarella Jr, a 61-year old former judge in Pennsylvania, has been sentenced to nearly 30 years in prison for literally selling young juveniles for cash. He was convicted of accepting money in exchange for incarcerating thousands of adults and children into a prison facility owned by a developer who was paying him under the table. The kickbacks amounted to more than $1 million.

The Pennsylvania Supreme Court has overturned some 4,000 convictions issued by him between 2003 and 2008, claiming he violated the constitutional rights of the juveniles – including the right to legal counsel and the right to intelligently enter a plea. Some of the juveniles he sentenced were as young as 10-years old.

Ciavarella was convicted of 12 counts, including racketeering, money laundering, mail fraud and tax evasion. He was also ordered to repay $1.2 million in restitution.

His “kids for cash” program has revealed that corruption is indeed within the prison system, mostly driven by the growth in private prisons seeking profits by any means necessary.

—-

Why might this not be a HUGE national story and his name not household? I’ll give you one guess what color those kids were.