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03 Oct 23:03

ravenscroft wood desk

by lavardera

ravenscroft-desk-1

A very beautiful wood desk by London furniture designer Leonhard Pfeifer via Design Milk.

ravenscroft-desk-6

I like the mash up of simple trestle desk, classic secretary cubbies, and stark modern detail that this desk brings together. Well done.

Ravenscroft Desk at Design Milk

01 Feb 18:48

Finnish Hacker Isolates Helicopter GPS Coordinates From YouTube Video Sounds

by Soulskill
An anonymous reader sends a post by Finnish electronics hacker Oona Räisänen, who heard a mysterious digital signal in the audio accompanying a YouTube video of a police chase. The chase was being filmed by a helicopter. Räisänen wrote: "The signal sits alone on the left audio channel, so I can completely isolate it. Judging from the spectrogram, the modulation scheme seems to be BFSK, switching the carrier between 1200 and 2200 Hz. I demodulated it by filtering it with a lowpass and highpass sinc in SoX and comparing outputs. Now I had a bitstream at 1200 bps. ... The bitstream consists of packets of 47 bytes each, synchronized by start and stop bits and separated by repetitions of the byte 0x80. Most bits stay constant during the video, but three distinct groups of bytes contain varying data." She guessed that the data was location telemetry from the helicopter, so she analyzed it to extract coordinates. When she plotted them and compared the resulting curve to the route taken by the fleeing car in the video, it was a match.

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Read more of this story at Slashdot.








03 Feb 15:56

Intersections: An Ornately Carved Wood Cube Projects Shadows onto Gallery Walls

by Christopher Jobson

Intersections: An Ornately Carved Wood Cube Projects Shadows onto Gallery Walls wood shadows religion light Islam installation
Intersections, 2013. 6.5′ Cube, projected Shadows: 35′ x 32′.

Intersections: An Ornately Carved Wood Cube Projects Shadows onto Gallery Walls wood shadows religion light Islam installation
Intersections, 2013. 6.5′ Cube, projected Shadows: 35′ x 32′.

Created by mixed media artist Anila Quayyum Agha, this elaborately carved cube with an embedded light source projects a dazzling pattern of shadows onto the surrounding gallery walls. Titled Intersections, the installation is made from large panels of laser-cut wood meant to emulate the geometrical patters found in Islamic sacred spaces. Agha shares:

The Intersections project takes the seminal experience of exclusion as a woman from a space of community and creativity such as a Mosque and translates the complex expressions of both wonder and exclusion that have been my experience while growing up in Pakistan. The wooden frieze emulates a pattern from the Alhambra, which was poised at the intersection of history, culture and art and was a place where Islamic and Western discourses, met and co-existed in harmony and served as a testament to the symbiosis of difference. I have given substance to this mutualism with the installation project exploring the binaries of public and private, light and shadow, and static and dynamic. This installation project relies on the purity and inner symmetry of geometric design, the interpretation of the cast shadows and the viewer’s presence with in a public space.

Intersections is currently a finalist in the 3rd Annual See.Me: Year in Review Competition, and you can learn more about it here. (via Twisted Sifter, Hi-Fructose)

18 Jul 09:34

The Champions Ring

by Benjamin Wiederkehr
The Champions Ring

Deroy Peraza from Hyperakt has been working on a follow-up project to the World Cup poster they published in 2010. The Champions Ring is a huge set of sports championships visualizations using radial brackets. The collection features 427 radial brackets (and counting) for the big 5 major leagues in the United States (MLB, NFL, NBA, NHL, MLS), the Football (read Soccer) Champions League, the Euro and the World Cup. Fine art prints of the posters can be ordered on demand from Curioos.

You just got to love the effort and inspiration Pereza put into this project:

I’ve loved sports since I was a little kid. It wasn’t just that I loved the games, I loved the numbers, the history and the team colors. I spent endless hours memorizing stats and drawing interpretations of team logos. I dreamed of being able to see the history of sports, and each team’s legacy within it, at a glance. I’ve granted my 10-year-old self that wish with The Champions Ring.




Submitter of The Champions RingDeroy Peraza is Principal and Creative Director of the Brooklyn based design firm Hyperakt that strives for meaningful design for the common good.
28 Jan 18:32

Build anything you want with Legos, in Chrome

by Billy Steele
Let's be honest: You're never too old to play with Legos. Thanks to the latest Chrome experiment (and a little help from WebGL) you can build whatever your heart desires directly from your browser. Using Maps, you're able to choose a ...
09 Nov 15:05

20 Beautiful Stationery Branding Mockups

by Rafi

frame logic

These days, most communication is done via the internet and most designers get their jobs on the internet as well. That’s why it’s easy to understand why most people don’t bother to think about stationery that much. It just doesn’t seem all that important anymore.

Well, is stationery important? Very much so. First of all, if you don’t have custom stationery at your business, you don’t look all that professional. Would you hire a lawyer that doesn’t have their own stationery? Then why would you hire a designer without stationery?

As a designer, it’s even more important to have good stationery. It’s a part of your job – some clients will want you to give them the complete package – logo, color scheme, branding, stationery. You know, the works. What does having no stationery say about a designer? That he’s not that good. Why would your client settle for second best? Would you?

Good looking stationery is almost as important as a good logo and a good identity. As a matter of fact, you can’t really have a good identity without good stationery – business cards, envelopes, the whole package.

Furthermore, even for non-designers, stationery is very important. For one thing, stationery helps with networking. When you write your clients or another business (be it a holiday card or an invoice), the first thing they notice is the stationery you’re using. Shoddy stationery just serves to undermine your credibility in front of your clients and collaborators.

The same goes for business cards. Whenever you meet someone on a work function, you should leave them with your card. That’s just proper business etiquette. The business card is a great opener when at meetings or conferences. It should represent you well. Custom stationery just shows your client that you care about the business (your own, of course, but also theirs) enough and that you appreciate their business. Your card should be professional, but it should also talk about you.

Your business is constantly sending out communications. That’s just the nature of business. Most of these are online these days, but there are still plenty of occasions where you have to use print. That’s why you need stationery. For all those times. You need the whole range – business cards, letterheads, envelopes, pens, pencils, invoices, compliment slips, quotes and estimates, letters of recommendation, thanks and apology and so on. Of course, some of the things in that enumeration can use the same kind of stationery – but it shows that you care if you go the extra mile. The more you customize your stationery, the better.

These are the reasons we’ve selected twenty very beautiful stationery mock ups. These are examples of how much great stationery can say about a company. They’re here to serve as design inspiration for the designers reading this as well as to convince those reticent to use stationery to jump on that train. It’s really not something you can pass on.

Verndale by Bluerock Design

verndale

verndale

Maderista by Anagrama

maderista

maderista

Manor Studio by Benjamin Koh

manor

manor

Ali Sharaf Photography by Mash Creative

manor

manor

Siobhan Byrne by Passport

Siobhan Byrne

Siobhan Byrne

Kolektyw by Wojciech Zalot & Gosia Zalot

 Kolektyw

 Kolektyw

Branding / Stationery Mock Up by Zeisla

 Branding / Stationery Mock Up

 Branding / Stationery Mock Up

Mylène Poisson Sommelière by Caserne

 Branding / Stationery Mock Up

 Branding / Stationery Mock Up

Antalis Design Stationery by Ken Lo

 Antalis Design Stationery

 Antalis Design Stationery

Stationery Mock-Up by TechNative

 Stationery Mock-Up

 Stationery Mock-Up

Semet Identity Branding by Mohd Almousa

 Semet Identity Branding

 Semet Identity Branding

Personal Identity by Ben Johnston

Personal Identity

Personal Identity

Self Promotion Justin Yi by Justin Sang-Ki Yi

Self Promotion Justin Yi

Self Promotion Justin Yi

I. H. Francesco Petrarca by Ana V. Francés

 I. H. Francesco Petrarca

 I. H. Francesco Petrarca

frameLOGIC Rebranding by Necon

 frameLOGIC Rebranding

 frameLOGIC Rebranding

Curious Space Identity by Mash Creative

 Curious Space Identity

 Curious Space Identity

Sophie Cheetham Photography by Alan Cheetham

 Sophie Cheetham Photography

 Sophie Cheetham Photography

Eskimo Identity by Pavel Emelyanov

 Eskimo Identity

 Eskimo Identity

Frederik Laux Photography by Christian Vögtlin

 Frederik Laux Photography

 Frederik Laux Photography

Befak Identity by Christian Vögtlin

 Befak Identity

 Befak Identity

Author Bio

Andra Postolache is the PR and Editor of Pixel77 and Designious. She enjoys a great vector pack, design tutorials, articles about Marketing and animal prints. Get in touch with her on Twitter and Google+.

 

27 Apr 12:46

Photo



26 Jan 21:20

Google cheat sheet

27 Jan 12:38

Found Wood Assembled Into Bas-Relief Sculptures by Ron van der Ende

by Christopher Jobson

Found Wood Assembled Into Bas Relief Sculptures by Ron van der Ende wood bas relief
Veneer Theory, 2014. Bas-relief in salvaged wood, 60″ x 61″ x 6″.

Found Wood Assembled Into Bas Relief Sculptures by Ron van der Ende wood bas relief
Watershed (Yosemite), 2013. Bas-relief in salvaged wood, 71″ x 79″ x 5″.

Found Wood Assembled Into Bas Relief Sculptures by Ron van der Ende wood bas relief
Cross-Section I, 2012. Bas-relief in salvaged wood, 74″ x 44″ x 5″.

Found Wood Assembled Into Bas Relief Sculptures by Ron van der Ende wood bas relief
Cross-Section I, detail.

Found Wood Assembled Into Bas Relief Sculptures by Ron van der Ende wood bas relief

Found Wood Assembled Into Bas Relief Sculptures by Ron van der Ende wood bas relief
Airstream R.V., 2012. Bas-relief in salvaged wood, 120″ x 53″ x 5″.

Found Wood Assembled Into Bas Relief Sculptures by Ron van der Ende wood bas relief
Airstream R.V., detail.

Found Wood Assembled Into Bas Relief Sculptures by Ron van der Ende wood bas relief
Phoenix: Rise! (Pontiac Firebird Trans-Am), 2011. Bas-relief in salvaged wood, 102″ x 37″ x 7″.

Found Wood Assembled Into Bas Relief Sculptures by Ron van der Ende wood bas relief
Phoenix: Rise! (Pontiac Firebird Trans-Am), detail.

Found Wood Assembled Into Bas Relief Sculptures by Ron van der Ende wood bas relief
Axonometric Array, 2008. Bas-relief in reclaimed timbers, size variable.

Found Wood Assembled Into Bas Relief Sculptures by Ron van der Ende wood bas relief
Cold Storage, 2013. Bas-relief in salvaged wood, 76″ x 52″ x 6″.

Working with stacks of found wood, Dutch artist Ron van der Ende assembles gigantic bas-relief sculptures inspired by space, nature, industry, as well as retro technology and vehicles. The original color and texture of each wood fragment is left intact, making each sculpture into a mosaic containing both a new image and the history of its materials. Van der Ende has so finely honed his technique that one might first assume when viewing a sculpture that they are instead paintings. Because of the artworks strong sense of perspective, some viewers have reported feeling dizzy when first encountering one of his sculptures.

You can see much more of the artist’s work on his website and he’ll also be showing work through Ambach & Rice in April at the Dallas Art Fair.

16 Jan 15:53

The sum of all positive integers

by Jason Kottke
Nikdatrix

Wait, What!?

What do you think you get if you add 1+2+3+4+5+... all the way on up to infinity? Probably a massively huge number, right? Nope. You get a small negative number:

This is, by a wide margin, the most noodle-bending counterintuitive thing I have ever seen. Mathematician Leonard Euler actually proved this result in 1735, but the result was only made rigorous later and now physicists have been seeing this result actually show up in nature. Amazing. (thx, chris)

Update: Of course (of course!) the actual truth seems more complicated, hinging on what "sum" means mathematically, etc. (via @cenedella)

Update: As usual, Phil Plait sorts things out on this complicated situation. (via @theory)

Tags: Leonard Euler   mathematics   video
17 Jan 15:26

Architectural Renderings of Life Drawn with Pencil and Pen by Rafael Araujo

by Christopher Jobson
Nikdatrix

MDFK!!!

Architectural Renderings of Life Drawn with Pencil and Pen by Rafael Araujo drawing butterflies architecture 3d

Architectural Renderings of Life Drawn with Pencil and Pen by Rafael Araujo drawing butterflies architecture 3d
Nautilus

Architectural Renderings of Life Drawn with Pencil and Pen by Rafael Araujo drawing butterflies architecture 3d
Caracol

Architectural Renderings of Life Drawn with Pencil and Pen by Rafael Araujo drawing butterflies architecture 3d
Double Conic Spiral, process

Architectural Renderings of Life Drawn with Pencil and Pen by Rafael Araujo drawing butterflies architecture 3d
Double Conic Spiral. Ink, acrylic/canvas.

Architectural Renderings of Life Drawn with Pencil and Pen by Rafael Araujo drawing butterflies architecture 3d

Architectural Renderings of Life Drawn with Pencil and Pen by Rafael Araujo drawing butterflies architecture 3d
Morpho

Architectural Renderings of Life Drawn with Pencil and Pen by Rafael Araujo drawing butterflies architecture 3d

Architectural Renderings of Life Drawn with Pencil and Pen by Rafael Araujo drawing butterflies architecture 3d
Calculation (Sequence) #2. Acrylic, china ink/canvas.

Architectural Renderings of Life Drawn with Pencil and Pen by Rafael Araujo drawing butterflies architecture 3d

Architectural Renderings of Life Drawn with Pencil and Pen by Rafael Araujo drawing butterflies architecture 3d

Architectural Renderings of Life Drawn with Pencil and Pen by Rafael Araujo drawing butterflies architecture 3d

In the midst of our daily binge of emailing, Tweeting, Facebooking, app downloading and photoshopping it’s almost hard to imagine how anything was done without the help of a computer. For Venezuelan artist Rafael Araujo, it’s a time he relishes. At a technology-free drafting table he deftly renders the motion and subtle mathematical brilliance of nature with a pencil, ruler and protractor. Araujo creates complex fields of three dimensional space where butterflies take flight and the logarithmic spirals of shells swirl into existence. He calls the series of work Calculation, and many of his drawings seem to channel the look and feel of illustrations found in Da Vinci’s sketchbooks. In an age when 3D programs can render a digital version of something like this in just minutes, it makes you appreciate Araujo’s remarkable skill. You can see much more here. (via ArchitectureAtlas)

17 Jan 05:52

[@digiornopizza]

16 Jan 14:16

A Lion Made from 4,000 Pieces of Hammered Metal by Selçuk Yılmaz

by Christopher Jobson

A Lion Made from 4,000 Pieces of Hammered Metal by Selçuk Yılmaz sculpture lions cats

A Lion Made from 4,000 Pieces of Hammered Metal by Selçuk Yılmaz sculpture lions cats

A Lion Made from 4,000 Pieces of Hammered Metal by Selçuk Yılmaz sculpture lions cats

A Lion Made from 4,000 Pieces of Hammered Metal by Selçuk Yılmaz sculpture lions cats

A Lion Made from 4,000 Pieces of Hammered Metal by Selçuk Yılmaz sculpture lions cats

A Lion Made from 4,000 Pieces of Hammered Metal by Selçuk Yılmaz sculpture lions cats

A Lion Made from 4,000 Pieces of Hammered Metal by Selçuk Yılmaz sculpture lions cats

A Lion Made from 4,000 Pieces of Hammered Metal by Selçuk Yılmaz sculpture lions cats

A Lion Made from 4,000 Pieces of Hammered Metal by Selçuk Yılmaz sculpture lions cats

A Lion Made from 4,000 Pieces of Hammered Metal by Selçuk Yılmaz sculpture lions cats

Created from nearly 4,000 pieces of metal scraps, Aslan (Turkish for Lion), is a recent sculpture by Istanbul-based artist Selçuk Yılmaz. The piece took nearly a year of work and involved hand-cutting and hammering of each individual metal piece. The final work weighs roughly 550 pounds (250kg). While we’ve seen dozens of artists use multiple components to create a final form, it’s worth noting how well the bent mental lends itself to the final shape of this impressive cat. You can see much more of his work on Behance.

28 Apr 23:35

hydrogeneportfolio: Minimal Posters -  Five Great...











hydrogeneportfolio:

Minimal Posters -  Five Great Mathematicians And Their Contributions.

13 Mar 04:11

itscolossal: This is what happens when you run water through a...







itscolossal:

This is what happens when you run water through a 24hz sine wave.

08 Jun 19:23

mathani: (following 1ucasvb)



mathani:

(following 1ucasvb)

18 Jul 08:07

de la mesa al mantel XXXVII

by GuiBo














01 Jan 14:52

anotherfirebender: m1ssred: chemical reaction *how to spawn...



















anotherfirebender:

m1ssred:

chemical reaction

*how to spawn demons: a beginner’s guide to chemistry