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20 Oct 13:00

iVerse to relaunch ComicsPLUS in November with uView, import and more

by Heidi MacDonald

 

unnamed4 iVerse to relaunch ComicsPLUS in November with uView, import and more

We all know that Amazon’s acquisition of Comixology changed the digital comics landscape. While the benefits that Amazon can bring for Comixology are evident, and still developing, it wasn’t without some steps backwards. When Comixology stopped making in-app purchases due to Amazon/Apple tensions, many publishers saw a drop in digital comics sales.

As we’ve noted before, other players are stepping in to promote their services.

So it should come as no surprise that ComicsPLUS, the digital comics app from iVerse that has long been the second player in the digital comics world, is getting a big makeover starting in November. iVerse CEO and owner Michael Murphey gave us a peek at the new app at New York Comic Con, and it has several shiny new features, including a new uView enhanced reading experience; enhanced search functions; a streamlined interface that offers comics series not only in chronological order but also a “Storyline” view that offers all the books in a given storyline. And the new app will also offer the ability to import any drm-free PDf, ebook or iTunes file into the service where it can be streamlined via uView and be searchable under its name.

uView is the ComicsPLUS version of “Guided View” and I’m told it does not conflict with the patent that Disney holds on that version of “enhanced viewing experience,” to give the non trademarked name for panels that zoom and flow on a tap. It’s entirely user controlled, and based on the preview Murphey gave me, it’s dead simple to use – you basically pinch and zoom to get panels moving in your preferred way. I’m not sure now many comics readers will want to go through all their comics and “uView them up” – but publishers or creators can also use this system themselves. In other words, yet another job for the intern.

I asked Murphey if this would lead to an iVerse version of Comixology’s “Submit” program and he pointed out that “we don’t turn people away.” Although they occasionally reject material that has problematic content, anyone can sell their comics via ComicsPLUS, and uView will offer a way for creators to take control over the viewing experience.

The “Storyline” feature is perfect for people who follow mainstream comics events. The revamped iVerse interface offers a very streamlines view of issues in a series, with the newest one on top. You can also see all the issues that tie in to a storyline—in reading order. Like I said, this is very useful if you’re catching up on Final Crisis or any Big Two event from the last 15 years. It would also be useful for something like Love and Rockets which has a twisting storylines that even experts have a hard time following. (Note, Fantagraphics books aren’t available on iVerse, I’m just spitballing here.)

The search function is basically a smoother application, and the goal is eventually to have a more “Netflix-like” interface. So if you read Punisher, for instance, you could be offered “more comics featuring amoral hitmen.”

Finally, there’s the import function, which for a digital hoarder such as myself could be useful. Basically any legally purchased book you own in epub or pdf format (possibly others, my notes are a bit hazy here) can be imported into the ComicsPLUS app and indexed along with your purchases in the app.

iVerse is definitely putting some muscle into this update, which will roll out starting in November. Some of the features will go live in early 2015. Of course, there is still the matter of publishers: iVerse offers Dynamite, Valiant, Marvel trades and many other publishers. But not DC at this point. Valiant has the biggest parnership with iVerse thus far, having put their entire library on the platform.

Is there room for another digital comics platform? I’m told that Apple would be thrilled to have their piece of the digital comics pie again: Comixology was frequently the top grossing app for iPad, and it firmly put digital comics on Apple’s radar. It was Amazon’s dislike of giving Apple their 30% cut of in-app purchases that led to them being removed from Comixology’s app. (You can still buy comics directly on the CX website, however.) So yeah, there are some pennies to be made there. If digital comics become some kind of status symbol in a tug of war between Apple and Amazon, it means more money thrown into the pot.

I’m also told several publishers are considering being available on multiple platforms for obvious reasons. Amazon’s feuds, price wars and heavy handed tactics are all well and good when you want to buy cheap pants, but you don’t want to get caught on the wrong side of the equation.

iVerse has developed into a player in the library market so it will be interesting to see where this goes.

 

17 Oct 18:45

Sound! Euphonium Novel Anime Adaptation Green-Lit

Music club students struggle to improve under a new adviser in Ayano Takeda's novel
11 Oct 13:30

The Drops of God Creators Start Kaitō Levain Manga

New series revolves around phantom thieves who steal wine from those who don't have proper love the drink
02 Oct 16:25

Can This Fine-Dining Chef Create the Chipotle of Sushi?

by Sierra Tishgart

Isara salmon temaki with seaweed salad and creamy miso — yours for just $6.

The next evolution of fine dining might truly be a full embrace of fast food. Look at brands like Shake Shack or Tortas Frontera: They're successful, well-considered spinoff companies that's can be replicated all over the world, yet they approach food from the same perspective as high-end restaurants. When it works, owners can maintain a sense of integrity about it — no one's accusing Danny Meyer or Rick Bayless of selling out; they're praising them for bringing high-quality food to airports and parks and other public spaces. Even Daniel Patterson and Roy Choi are getting in on the action with loco'l, "a new kind of fast-food restaurant" that will launch this spring. But this week, right in New York, All'onda chef (and Morimoto and Ai Fiori alum) Chris Jaeckle opened Uma Temakeria in Chelsea, a fast-casual restaurant that specializes in Japanese temaki, or cone-shaped hand rolls. Will Uma do for sushi what Chipotle did for burritos? Grub talked to Jaeckle to find out.

What inspired you to start a so-called fast-casual concept?
Over the years, I've been thinking about what I can do to make higher-quality Japanese food more accessible. My go-to comfort foods are pasta, which I get to make at All'onda, and sushi. If I'm having a bad day, or I'm really hungry, they're what I want. I didn't really see — I don't know if angle is the right word — but pasta is accessible in America, and I didn't see anyone doing good sushi at a low price point. Temaki is something I saw that you can carry with you, or eat on the street. I thought it was ideal.

There's certainly a lot of cheap sushi in New York, but so much of it, like you said, is mediocre at best. What's the major issue?
The void in the market is that you can either sit down for two hours and spend $100 and get a quality product, or you go into Duane Reade, spend $9, and you have no what idea what kind of protein you're eating. The main issue is that the rice is cold, or made in different facilities. Once rice is refrigerated, it kills the texture and the quality.

Jaeckle

Jaeckle with co-owner Cynthia Kueppers.Photo: Melissa Hom

How are you balancing this with cooking at All'onda, which isn't even a year old?
I don't sleep a lot. I wish I had a better answer to that. But Uma is different than All'onda: I built the business plan and raised the capital, but it has always been structured as something for me to build and take a step back into a role as an owner. I'll be there for the next few months, but the idea is to streamline it so I don't need to be there every day. I can eventually take a backseat.

I came up with this business plan when I was at Ai Fiori. This isn't something that I'm doing just because I'm the "It" kid. It's taken years, and the timing worked out that they're both this year, which I wish wasn't the case, because it's pushing me.

You're one of several high-profile chefs opening a fast-casual concept — Daniel Patterson and Roy Choi will launch loco'l next year. What's the draw, beyond the obvious financial benefits?
There's a lot of risk involved in all these projects, but yes, there is potential to make actual money. I want to have a family someday. And I want to be there to support my family. What I do for a living isn't taking in hundreds of thousands of dollars. You have to find a way to expand, but not necessarily compromise what your focal point is — and, for me, that's All'onda ... And I'm legitimately passionate about sushi and Japanese food. It's not just a smart idea as a businessperson.

How are you sourcing high-quality fish at such a low price point?
I'm fully prepared for people to pick on me about the quality of the fish. People need to understand that I'm selling a product for $6. For example, it's tuna from the Philippines — we did what we could with sustainability to manage the price point. We're doing a seasonal, local fish, which is fluke at the moment, and from Long Island. We have fluke, salmon, tuna, and crab. The striped-bass season just ended, but maybe that will be the local fish next summer. We're trying to do the best we can. The rolls are a take on what is traditionally Japanese-American.

Jaeckle

It's at 64 Seventh Ave.Photo: Melissa Hom

Which fast-casual chains do you think get it right?
Chipotle is the obvious answer, although I'm curious about if they're going to go with a McDonald's-like expansion. You're starting to see signs in windows about GMO-free "when possible," and that just comes with expanding a company. It is what it is. I think Sweetgreen does a good job.

Is your goal to take this nationwide?
The hope is to open several more locations. We raised a fair amount of capital, and we're hoping that if this one is profitable, then we expand. We structured it through franchise rates so that we can have 10 or 20 of them. I'm an ambitious human being, but realistically, it's going to be a New York thing for the next few years. But I'd love to see this in every city in America.

Read more posts by Sierra Tishgart

Filed Under: interviews, all'onda, chris jaeckle, new york, uma temakeria








02 Oct 17:15

This Extremely Blue Japanese Beer Is Finally Available in the U.S.

by Clint Rainey

Abashiri Beer's Okhotsk Blue Draft was introduced to Japan five years ago as a gimmicky, quaffable paean to the frigid Sea of Okhotsk, but thanks to online curio depot Firebox, the courageous American or homesick Tokyoite can now order it in $21 four-packs, filling a demand neither likely had.

Only $5.25 a can! Photo: Cassandra Rose Tannenbaum/New York Magazine

Of course, bright blue isn't what you'd call the most natural color, but Abashiri achieves the refreshing hue organically with gardenias, local seaweed, and melted Okhotsk iceberg water. Bonus: Chinese yam is said to throw in a "superior head" that looks like ice. Reviews are less than stellar, but still, those Silver Bullet blue mountains feel a little cheapened right now.

[Firebox via FWF]

Read more posts by Clint Rainey

Filed Under: kind of blue, abashiri beer, beer, blue beer, japan, okhotsk blue draft








02 Oct 18:35

15 New York Restaurants Where Brunch Is Obscenely Expensive

by Vicky Gan

There's a reason they're called silver dollars.

This weekend, the revamped Rainbow Room reopens to the public ... sort of. Most of the week, it will be closed for private events. There will be public dinners and shows on Monday nights, but the best time to get in will be the weekly Sunday brunch buffet — which will cost a whopping $95 per person before tax, tip, or alcohol (and you can bet the mimosas won't be cheap). Surely this must be the most expensive brunch option in New York, right? But after hunting around, it turns out there is a shocking number of places where eggs, coffee, and some juice will run you nearly a Benjamin. We understand that the well-heeled and expense-account crowds need to work off their hangovers as much as the hoi polloi, but these price points nevertheless feel steep. Here are 15 restaurants where brunch or breakfast will run you a whole lot of money.

The spots below are listed in descending order of how much brunch will cost before tax and tip. When brunch or breakfast is served at a set price, that's what we've used. At restaurants with à la carte pricing, we've added the average price of an appetizer, the average price of an entree, plus any additional costs for juice and coffee, which are typically included in set-price meals, to arrive at a representative price per person. (And no, we didn't include the $1,000 lobster omelette at Norma's or any other stunt menu items because, come on.)

1. Peacock Alley at the Waldorf Astoria
What It Costs: $98
What You Get: The Sunday brunch buffet includes raw bar, smoked fish and meat carving stations, hot entrées, a glass of Champagne or mimosa, and ... a chocolate fountain.

2. Arabelle Restaurant at the Plaza Athénée
What It Costs: $98
What You Get: A seafood display, pastries, salads, and pate and terrine at the Sunday brunch buffet, plus your choice of an entree (like eggs Benedict, lemon sole, or hanger steak).

3. Rainbow Room
What It Costs: $95
What You Get: Sunday brunch takes over the dance floor, with chefs serving seafood, breads, roasted meats, pastries, cheese, charcuterie, and "internationally-inspired dishes" like Thai curry and pork buns at individual stations. Desserts, such as beignets and apple cider doughnuts, are delivered table-side.

4. Caviar Russe
What It Costs: $95
What You Get: Three courses, featuring fancy-pants ingredients like Shigoku oysters and foie gras.

5. The Garden at The Four Seasons
What It Costs: à la carte average, $71.88
What You Get: Gut-busting mash-ups like pancake-wrapped pigs in a blanket ($28), eggs with lobster hash ($42), and a poached-egg-topped pastrami tartine ($32).

6. Auden Bistro & Bar at the Ritz-Carlton Central Park
What It Costs: à la carte average, $68.43
What You Get: A $26 egg-white omelet, a $33 petite filet, a $22 tomato and mozzarella salad, along with the usual brunch items.

7. Regency Bar & Grill at the Loews Regency
What It Costs: à la carte average, $67.92
What You Get: This is the power breakfast spot. How do you know it's only for high rollers? You can start your day off right with $48 veal Milanese or $65 Dover sole. Casual.

8. The Carlyle
What It Costs: $65
What You Get: Appetizers include lobster bisque and chicken liver mousse, and there are entrees like smoked-salmon pizza and lamb chops include in the prix fixe menu. For dessert: a 20-layer crepe cake and a glass of Prosecco.

9. Asiate at the Mandarin Oriental
What It Costs: $64
What You Get: Beef carpaccio, bacon-and-eggs risotto, and a barbecue duck tostada headline the three-course menu.

10. Ai Fiori
What It Costs: $64
What You Get: Smoked fish, cheese, charcuterie, pastries, and "signature granola" at the buffet, plus your choice of an entree like lobster eggs Benedict, or the eight-ounce White Label burger. Freebies: juice, coffee, and tea!

11. Pembroke Room at the Lowell
What It Costs: à la carte average, $63.26
What You Get: Why not splurge for the poached eggs with caviar ($31), the sirloin with eggs ($34)?

12. Sirio at the Pierre
What It Costs: à la carte average, $62.06
What You Get: The menu ranges from brunch twists like "scrambled eggs Caprese" to grilled salmon and a cheeseburger with "Tuscan fries."

13. The Mark
What It Costs: à la carte average, $60.90
What You Get: Eggs with caviar cost $45, but you can go save a few bucks by opting for the tuna burger ($28) or veal Milanese ($39) instead.

14. The River Café
What It Costs: $55
What You Get: Start with a duck egg, foie gras, or Wagyu steak tartare before a plate of "golden pancakes," made with 24-karat gold-dusted milk chocolate.

15. The Lambs Club
What It Costs: à la carte average, $51.67
What You Get: Choices include oysters on the half-shell ($3.50 each — pretty standard), eggs en cocotte ($18), or the restaurant's namesake burger on toasted challah ($22). Bonus: You might even see regular Anna Wintour — maybe.

Read more posts by Vicky Gan

Filed Under: grub guides, brunch, new york, the rainbow room








30 Sep 15:39

A fan made an animated version of “Aoi Honoo” (Blue...





















A fan made an animated version of “Aoi Honoo” (Blue Blazes) japanese tv drama opening using original style/characters of Kazuhiko Shimamoto manga :
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3otoajlC_hQ

01 Oct 01:30

The Kei Effect: Nishikori's Impact On Asian Tennis

by Robert Davis
Kei Nishikori's success is taking tennis to a new level of popularity in Asia.

[[More Tennis News on ATPWorldTour.com]]
01 Oct 16:42

Barcade's New St. Marks Location is Dedicated to the 90s, and it Opens Next Week

by Devra Ferst

A bar for people who love Michael Jackson and Street Fighter II.

The retro arcade game-filled Barcade is opening its fifth location and first bar focused on 90's era video games next week in the old Kim's Video space, which it took over back in May. Classics games like "Rampage: World Tour" and "Street Fighter II" will be there, and so will "Moonwalker" (a game featuring Michael Jackson).

To fuel all of that gaming there will be pub fare, similar to what they serve at the Chelsea location. Dishes include a chicken banh mi and a "fat sandwich" called the Fat St. Mark's, stuffed with fried chicken, pulled pork, fries, cheese sauce, and a fried egg (perhaps not the best thing to eat mid-DDR-ing). To drink there will be 24 American beers on tap and a few wines. The crew opted not to serve hard liquor after a community board meeting where neighbors voiced concerns over a noisy crowd coming from the bar late at night. 6 St. Marks Place, East Village

01 Oct 15:49

While discussing movies...

by MRTIM

30 Sep 07:30

Event: 2014 All Japan Model Hobby Show - Kotobukiya, MEGAHOUSE and WAVE

by Disposable Henchman

The massive photodump of moe and mecha continues with a bit of Metal Gear to keep things fresh. 

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*All photos taken with permission.
*Photos are of samples and the final product may vary.

30 Sep 03:06

Event: 2014 All Japan Model Hobby Show - Star Wars & Bandai Collectors Booths

by Disposable Henchman
kate

Master Asia FTW

Next in our coverage of the 2014 All Japan Model Hobby Show we take you to a galaxy far, far away and back again for some goodies from Bandai Collectors Division!

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*All photos taken with permission.
*Photos are of samples and the final product may vary.

29 Sep 14:00

Pre-order Yotsuba and Danbo in space!

by Vanessa Cubillo

The greatest thing to come out of Wonder Festival Winter was Sentinel’s take on Danboard. They took this charming cardboard robot and threw him up in space. That sounds kind of cruel, but no they made him a spaceship!

That was cool all on its own, then a saw the prototype of little astronaut, Yotsuba and I was in love. So I have been waiting to see this figure again. All I had seen up to now was Sentinel’s limited edition Danbo figures that appeared at the last Wonder Festival.

They were really cool too, but it was too expensive to try and get. Well, now that figure I was waiting for is available for pre-order. Called Maschinen Danboard #004 Normal, this set has spaceship Danbo with his awesome pilot, Yotsuba and her copilot bear, Duralumin.

I guess he’s called normal, because unlike the other Danbo figures released, he doesn’t have an awesome design. That’s ok, because this figure is over four inches tall and comes with a lot of stuff. You’ll get Danbo, Yotsuba, Duralumin, a pilot head, two wrist parts, four nozzles, an arm gun, weapon, and display base. Coming out in late January, you can pre-order this set now for ¥4,860. 

[ Pre-order at AmiAmi | CD Japan | Play Asia | J-List | ToysLogic ]

Pre-order Yotsuba and Danbo in space! screenshot

Read more...
30 Sep 13:20

The 11 Strangest Starbucks Locations on the Planet

by Clint Rainey

Sadly, the Starbucks in the Forbidden City closed down in 2007.

"There's probably a Starbucks coffeehouse near you," the coffee chain's online store locator says, which turns out to be truer than you may imagine. As part of its generalized world-domination schematic, the green mermaid has infiltrated some of the most remote, highly patrolled, and otherwise deepest corners of society. For a long time, perhaps the oddest Starbucks on Earth could be found within the Forbidden City in Beijing, but that one closed down in 2007. Several more unusual and far-flung coffee counters have opened all over the world since then; here are a few of them.

At CIA headquarters: As America just learned over the weekend, the CIA has its own super-secret in-house Starbucks. The lines for lattes are apparently long enough to have bristled a top official, and of course, baristas can't jot their customers' names on cups. "It just didn’t work for this location," says a supervisor at the site, reportedly one of the busiest Starbucks locations in the world.

At Disneyland: Last year, the mermaid appeared on Main Street, U.S.A., causing some chatter about whether this was the kiss of death for the Happiest Place on Earth's "feeling of hometown charm." It turns out that parents' desire to get Pumpkin Spice Lattes outweighs any of those concerns.

On a train through the Swiss Alps: Starbucks's foray into moving-train stores clanked away last November on the Swiss national railway. The café is "one of the smallest" ever designed, but your confusion would be forgiven; Starbucks logos run from locomotive to caboose. It even picked the color theme inside — "the shades and tints associated with coffee" is one way of putting it. "Lots of brown" would be another.

Aboard the USS Boxer and USS Harry S. Truman: Referred to as "Starboxer" and staffed entirely by sailors, the Navy warship's "fully functioning" café gives crew members "one more thing they won't miss" back home. Before it opened early last year, Starbucks whipped baristas into proper frap-blending and milk-frothing shape, but café profits fatten up the ship's Morale, Welfare, and Recreation fund. There's also one on the USS Carl Vinson.

The "Triple C" at Guantánamo Bay serves Starbucks coffee as well as ice-cream sundaes. Photo: Geo Swan/Wikimedia Commons

Inside Forever 21's corporate headquarters: Decaf's probably best for the teenage crowd annihilating store racks, but employees in the L.A. corporate office have an unnecessary in-house 'Bucks, complete with the full line of drinks, pastries, and even merchandise.

In a still-operational funeral home: Robinson Funeral Home in South Carolina has doubled as a proud purveyor of Pike and Wi-Fi since 2012, and the owner says it's not just for those grieving. Anyone looking for quiet spot to sip a mocha can enter through the side patio.

At the Tower of London: Visitors too Beefeater'd out can skip the Tower's own offerings "inspired by 1,000 years of great British food" and grab a venti cup of American capitalism instead.

In the Louvre: "The perfect place for a hot drink and a snack while browsing a selection of books published by the Louvre"? It may be necessary, especially if you plan to plow through several wings at the museum.

In the middle of a cruise ship: Royal Caribbean created the world's "first Starbucks at sea" in 2010 when it rolled out its new Allure of the Seas, the world's largest cruise ship.

At the top of a ski slope: An après-ski hot coffee is hardly unusual, but California's Squaw Valley has a café with "an array of hot and cold drinks" that takes ski-up window orders without unstrapping. There are even tables set up in the snow.

At Guantánamo Bay: The Department of Defense helped set up this café, Wi-Fi enabled, "just a stone's throw away" from the detainee camps. It's proven controversial, and Starbucks's official position is that it doesn't take a position on Gitmo's legality, though national-security journalists have noted the policy of trading its coffee for detainee intel often had "the same — and probably better — effect" as torture. This place isn't an official Starbucks; the coffee is just poured there. It also is "a family favorite for splits and sundaes."


[Washington Post]

Read more posts by Clint Rainey

Filed Under: starbucks, the chain gang; @digital-regular








30 Sep 19:45

PepsiCo Wants to Patent Granola Bars Stuffed With Pop Rocks

by Clint Rainey

Snap, crackle, and pop.

Right now in some windowless PepsiCo food lab, scientists are doing crazy and secret things to everybody's favorite exploding candy — enough, at least, to convince the Quaker Oats parent company it's time to go after a patent. Sure, companies file preemptively for all kinds oft-trademarked things, all the time, but a healthy-ish granola bar sold with some sugary, carbonated land mines embedded right in there seems so trashy it's destined to become a reality.

"Bite-size pieces, orbs, donuts, and other three dimensional geometric shapes are [also] contemplated within the scope of the invention," the patent — for a "particulate mixture either therein or as a coating to the chewy granola product base," specifically — says. There goes that "all-natural" label.

[Food Navigator]

Read more posts by Clint Rainey

Filed Under: poor mikey, carbonated candy, frankenfood, granola bars, pepsico, pop rocks








27 Sep 16:16

what ARE boys? we just don’t know Also on Tapastic!





















what ARE boys? we just don’t know

Also on Tapastic!

27 Sep 20:18

Discounts on LEGO Train 2014 Sets

by Limmy

Amazon UK has great discounts on 2 recently released LEGO City train sets. LEGO City High-Speed Passenger Train (60051) is discounted 23% to $115 while LEGO City Cargo Train (60052) is discounted 18% to $164. Both are motorized train sets controlled by a remote.

It’s better to import these big sets since the price is much lower than the current US price. Just add either set to your cart and use Amazon’s currency convertor at checkout to see the final price in US dollars. If you buy both, you will save on shipping.


23% off – LEGO City High-Speed Passenger Train (60051) – $115


18% off – LEGO City Cargo Train (60052) – $164

The post Discounts on LEGO Train 2014 Sets appeared first on Groove Bricks.

26 Sep 10:00

Chart: You're Working More But Earning Less

by Dave Gilson

We'll be posting a new chart on the current state of income inequality every day for the next couple of weeks. Yesterday's chart looked at the history of the 1 percent, from ancient Rome to today.

Today, another look at how middle-class incomes have been stuck in neutral while the rest of the economy has grown. In 2012, the median household income (adjusted for inflation) was the same as it was in 1996.

Sources: Household income: US Census; economic growth: St. Louis Fed; 1 percent: Emmanuel Saez and Thomas Piketty (Excel); corporate profits: St. Louis Fed 

Illustrations and infographic design by Mattias Mackler​

26 Sep 10:00

This Republican Who Wants to End the Weekend Is Probably Headed to Congress

by Andy Kroll

Glenn Grothman, a Republican state senator who is on track to be the next congressman from Wisconsin's 6th district, has never been shy about speaking his mind. He's a bomb-thrower, a perpetual outrage machine for his liberal opponents, and a gift to the local and national press corps.

Grothman briefly stepped onto the national stage during the 2011 protests against Republican Gov. Scott Walker's effort to curb public workers' bargaining rights. He was one of the most outspoken critics of the anti-Walker protesters. On MSNBC, he derided those protesting the bill as "a bunch of slobs" and compared those who occupied the state Capitol to "college students and hangers-on having a party."

In August, Grothman surprised many, including some in his own party, by squeezing out the narrowest of victories in the GOP primary in his overwhelmingly Republican district, which includes Oshkosh and Fond du Lac. Referring to Grothman's previous remarks about women, one Republican operative tweeted, "Gee, so glad we nominated the guy w/ a reputation of being a misogynist in #WI06 w/ both our Gov and AG candidates down vs women."

Uncharacteristically, Grothman has gone silent since his primary victory. (His campaign did not respond to requests for comment.)

Here is a roundup of what might be called his greatest hits. Read them and remember that Grothman is likely headed to Congress.

Days off from work are "a little ridiculous": In January, Grothman proposed rolling back a Wisconsin law requiring employers to give workers at least one day of rest per week. He told the Huffington Post the existing state law was "a little goofy" and his proposal was about "freedom." "Right now in Wisconsin, you're not supposed to work seven days in a row, which is a little ridiculous because all sorts of people want to work seven days a week," he said.

Sex ed could turn kids gay: In 2010, Grothman, who believes that homosexuality is a choice, proposed banning Wisconsin public school teachers from mentioning homosexuality in sex education classes because some teachers had an "agenda" to turn kids gay.

Planned Parenthood is racist: In January 2013, Grothman appeared on Voice of Christian Youth America, an evangelical talk show, and he called Planned Parenthood "the most overtly racist organization." He said that Planned Parenthood has a pattern of "not liking people who are not white" and specifically targets Asian Americans for sex-selective abortions. (Planned Parenthood opposes sex-selective abortions.) 

"Money is more important for men": After voting in 2011 to repeal Wisconsin's equal-pay protection law, Grothman argued that the male-female pay gap wasn't about discrimination in the workplace. "Take a hypothetical husband and wife who are both lawyers," he told the Daily Beast. "But the husband is working 50 or 60 hours a week, going all out, making 200 grand a year. The woman takes time off, raises kids, is not go go go. Now they're 50 years old. The husband is making 200 grand a year, the woman is making 40 grand a year. It wasn't discrimination. There was a different sense of urgency in each person." He added, "You could argue that money is more important for men. I think a guy in their first job, maybe because they expect to be a breadwinner someday, may be a little more money-conscious." (At a 2010 tea party rally, Grothman said, "In the long run, a lot of women like to stay at home and have their husbands be the primary breadwinner.") 

People on food stamps don't act poor enough: In a 2004 op-ed calling for new restrictions on the federal food stamps program, Grothman outlined the extensive research that informed his position. "I've interviewed over a dozen people who check out people who pay with food stamps," he wrote, "and all felt people on food stamps ate better—or at least more costly—than they did." He also wrote: "Observations of people who work in food stores indicate that many people who use food stamps do not act as if they are genuinely poor."

God is probably mad at John Kerry: In April, Grothman appeared again on Voice of Christian Youth America, and he discussed Secretary of State Kerry's efforts to lobby against Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni's bill to punish gays and lesbians. "Now, usually I associate the United States with being a positive influence on Africa," Grothman said. "You associate the United States with sending missionaries to Africa…Instead, what we have is the secretary of state going to Africa and educating Ugandans or saying he is going to send American scientists to Uganda to explain how normal homosexuality is. Think about that. What must God think of our country?"

The Kwanzaa conspiracy: A December 2012 press release issued by Grothman's state senate office asked, "Why Must We Still Hear About Kwanzaa?" In it, Grothman claimed that Kwanzaa is a phony holiday promoted by "white left-wingers who try to shove this down black people's throats in an effort to divide Americans." He urged "mainstream Americans" to be "more outspoken on this issue. It's time it's slapped down once and for all."

Affirmative action is "offensive": Following the US Supreme Court's 2014 ruling in Schuette v. Coalition to Defend Affirmative Action, which upheld a ban on racial preferences in college admissions, Grothman said he would re-up a previous bill outlawing all race- and gender-based affirmative action programs in Wisconsin. "There's no question that affirmative action is an idea whose time has come and gone," he told Wisconsin Public Radio. "It's offensive and it's very anti-business."

If he could turn back time: Grothman told an interviewer in 2010, "Did people even know what homosexuality was in high school in 1975? I don't remember any discussion about that at the time. There were a few guys who would make fun of a few effeminate boys, but that's a different thing than homosexuality. Homosexuality was not on anyone's radar. And that's a good thing." But Grothman doesn't just miss the '70s; he's also said he wants to turn the clock back to the 1950s.

25 Sep 19:10

America’s Fastest-Growing Restaurant Chain Is a Breastaurant Called Twin Peaks

by Clint Rainey
kate

Dude is this what Boobies in Space Dandy is based on?


Great job, America.

News in the fast-casual dining world sector has been all about glum topics like closures and activist investor takeovers lately, but Twin Peaks, the burgeoning chain of self-described "racy" breastaurants, is somehow making it all work. Now up to $165 million in annual sales and 57 locations in the last nine years — 21 more are on the way — it is the fastest-growing restaurant chain in the country, according to Businessweek.

America's next biggest chain was founded on the bedrock principle that "Hooters just wasn't racy enough," it turns out, and is piloted by a Southerner named Randy DeWitt, who flipped Twin Peaks into expansion hyperdrive by buying up as many bankrupt Bennigan's and Rockfish Grill locations as he could before giving them the "racy" treatment. Not surprisingly, servers in this environment are given "points for hair, makeup, slenderness, and the cleanliness of their uniforms," plus discounts at tanning salons and the gym, and a special "diet menu" that helps "to keep them from gaining weight." All told, each location brings in a reported average of $3.6 million a year, and while DeWitt says servers bring in $500 a shift, former employees say that's more like $150.

Still, the chain's "girls brand manager," who once landed a spot on a Hooters calendar, says its servers are not being exploited. "I think it’s a great place for the girls. They can work their way through college and move on," she tells Businessweek.

[Businessweek]

Read more posts by Clint Rainey

Filed Under: empire building, breastaurants, hooters, twin peaks; @digital-news








25 Sep 17:24

Pony Canyon Launches North American Anime Distributor PONYCAN

by Joseph Luster
kate

BLEH.

We briefly mentioned it in the announcement of Crunchyroll's plans to stream Yuki Yuna wa Yusha de Aru, but Pony Canyon's latest move is worth its own post. The Japanese visual and audio entertainment distributor is taking the leap into the North American market with a new brand called PONYCAN USA.

 

The first two titles coming out of PONYCAN are Denki-Gai no Honya-san and Yuki Yuna wa Yusha de Aru. In addition to worldwide streaming, PONYCAN has plans to begin releasing new anime titles on Blu-ray and DVD throughout North America in 2015, promising the same high standard of quality as the Japanese editions. 

 

 

PONYCAN also has future plans to launch new anime for worldwide streaming on a regular basis.

 

In addition to the website linked above, PONYCAN has an official Twitter and Facebook.

 

-------

Joseph Luster is the Games and Web editor at Otaku USA Magazine. His blog can be found at subhumanzoids. Follow him on Twitter @Moldilox.

25 Sep 18:03

Ligaya Mishan Thinks Old Tbilisi's Georgian Cheesy Bread Will Bring You to Your Knees

by Devra Ferst

Ligaya Mishan reviews the old school Georgian food at Bleecker Street's Old Tbilisi Garden.

Ligaya Mishan visits Manhattan's newest Georgian restaurant Old Tbilisi Garden, which charmed Robert Sietsema just a month ago. She writes: "If there is one Georgian dish that could bring Manhattan to its knees, it is adjaruli khachapuri, a thick flatbread with the ends tapered into blunt handles and the middle a caldron of near-volcanic cheese. A yolk slowly sets on top, like a giant gold pupil. Admire it, then beat the egg and cheese together and tear off bread to ladle it up." Old Tbilisi, 174 Bleecker Street, 212-470-6064.

25 Sep 16:00

12 New Places to Try for Your Next Great Pizza Experience

by Sierra Tishgart

A grandma pie from Pizza Moto.

New York has always been a city full of world-class pizza options, and the best news is that that isn't about to change anytime soon. In fact, 2014 has already seen a lot of new, outstanding options that could, in time, offer all-time favorites like Roberta's or Franny's some healthy competition. Chef Nick Anderer's kitchen is already turning out near-perfect thin-crust pies at Marta, Emily has quickly become a Clinton Hill mainstay, and places like GG's are going old-school with grandma-style varieties. Here are a dozen relative newcomers that are turning out seriously great options.

B-Side
Chef Jason Neroni recently opened this Neapolitan pizzeria, which serves up an "Oscar the Grouch” pie with spinach, black kale, garlic, mozzarella, and fonduta ($15). And you can't go wrong with the rich carbonara pizza: smoked mozzarella, pancetta, and a soft egg ($17).

Ogliastro Pizza Bar
The team behind Bar Toto introduced Ogliastro in Crown Heights. Order the "Agnello" with housemade lamb sausage, fior di latte, radishes, pistachios, feta, yogurt, and, yes, spicy honey ($20).

Marta
Danny Meyer's brand-new restaurant is already turning out exceptional pizzas: Two standouts include the potato-guanciale-pecorino pie ($15) and the super-seasonal "Mercato," with ricotta, cherry tomatoes, corn, okra, and sweet peppers ($14).

Pizza

Marta's Fiori di Zucca: mozzarella, zucchini flowers, anchovy.Photo: Melissa Hom


Il Buco Alimentari
This spring, the beloved Italian restaurant introduced Roman-style pizza al taglio at the to-go part of this Great Jones Street restaurant. The varieties change daily, but you can often find a $5 Margherita slice, and recently, a pie with grilled onion, king-trumpet mushrooms, and prosciutto.

GG's
At this Goat Town reboot, chef Bobby Hellen serves a square grandma-style pizza with tomato sauce, mozzarella, basil, and oregano ($18), as well as the "1986" — an ode to Hellen's love of the Mets, which includes spicy sopressata, fennel agrodolce, pickled peppers, and anise hyssop ($15).

Pizza

The square grandma-style pizza at GG's.Photo: Melissa Hom


Annabel
The team behind Thalia and Mark Burger opened a wood-fire pizzeria in Hell's Kitchen this summer. Nontraditional pies include ricotta, duck prosciutto, and blueberry chutney ($17), and eggplant, tomato sauce, pesto, capers, chili flakes, and pecorino ($14).

Emily
This Clinton Hill restaurant has quickly become a neighborhood favorite: Go for the vodka pie (vodka sauce, Surryano ham, mozzarella, parsley, for $17), and stay for the s'mores calzone.

Trakia
At this Astoria restaurant, the dough is made from 100 percent organic flour from Chaplain Valley Mills and baked in a wood-fired brick oven. Varieties include BBQ chicken (with gouda cheese, for $16) and even a smoked-salmon pie ($17).

Gato
Don't forget that there are two Roman-style pizzas on Bobby Flay's menu: one with goat cheese, tomato, olives, and capers ($16); and another with lamb sausage, tomato jam, mozzarella, and mint ($17).

Pizza

Gato's pizza with lamb sausage.Photo: Melissa Hom

Louie and Chan
New chef Kevin Chu has revamped the menu to include pies like "Lombardina" — zucchini puree, squash blossoms, chrysanthemum, Taleggio, and Sicilian oregano ($19) — and a classic "Vongole": clams in the shell, pecorino, olive oil, fresh parsley, roasted garlic, and lemon zest ($19).

Heartwood
Head over to Chelsea for quirky wood-fired pies like "Duck Ham Pizza," with house-cured duck ham, pickled peaches, arugula, walnuts, and Gruyère ($22), or the aptly named "When Peter Luger Goes Out for Pizza," with braised short rib, creamed spinach, and horseradish ($22).

Pizza Moto at Berg'n
The new Crown Heights food court includes the pizza made famous at Smorgasburg — and flavors include a four-cheese artichoke pie, and a three-mushroom pizza with fontina, garlic, and smoked mozzarella. They all cost $10 for a small, and $18 for a large.

Read more posts by Sierra Tishgart

Filed Under: grub guides, annabel, b-side, black seed, emily, gato, gg’s, heartwood, il buco alimentari, louie and chan, marta, new york, obica mozzarella bar pizza e cucina, ogliastro pizza bar, pizza, pizza moto, trakia; @digital-regular








24 Sep 15:00

2015 MoCCA Festival announces first guests and move to a new venue

by Heidi MacDonald

center548 north west side 2 2015 MoCCA Festival announces first guests and move to a new venueAfter years of awkwardness regarding temperature, comfort and general feng sui, MoCCA is leaving the Lexington Armory for a new venue in 2015. Mocca Fest’s new home is Center 548, which based on the photos on its website, looks like an open, airy modernish venue more like The Puck Building, where MoCCA was born.

The 2015 show is set for April 11-12th and the first GUests of Honor have been announced: Aline Kominsky-Crumb, Scott McCloud, Raina Telgemeier, and J.H. Williams, a nice broad-based, genre spanning list.

In a statement, Society of Illustrators Executive Director Anelle Miller said, “We are so thrilled to usher in a new era for the MoCCA Fest in 2015! Our guests of honor have each left indelible impressions on the comics medium, and how that medium is seen by audiences all over the world. We are proud to host them, as we grow into a new space and an expanded slate of programming that will form a dynamic festival that New York will be proud of. And there’s so much more to come!”

Center 548 is located on West 22nd Street, near the Highline and a bevy or art galleries and other cutting edge cultural institutions that fit in with the MoCCA message. MoCCA Festival will take up three floors of exhibits with on site programming, an art exhibit and a rooftop café. There will be a small reduction in the number of tables available but table prices will remain the same, with applications opening on November 3rd. For those driving in, it’s right next to the West Side Highway.

The new venue will open a new chapter in MoCCA’s history. I’ll definitely miss being able to roll out of bed 10 minutes before a panel, but hey, the nabe just wasn’t the same after Baoguette closed. At the very least the new venue looks to be climate controlled, which is something the Armory wasn’t.

Photo from the Center 548 website.

19 Sep 14:30

sendoutakeshi: i have never seen an image more powerful than...



sendoutakeshi:

i have never seen an image more powerful than this

CLAMP really, really loves Jojo’s Bizarre Adventure, guys. They wrote some really…INTERESTING doujinshi. (Not to mention Jotaro makes a guest appearance in the CLAMP in Wonderland animated short, too.)

23 Sep 17:36

How little bees take on enormous hornets

by Matthew Inman
kate

I am convinced I saw one of these Japanese Giant Hornets the other day.

How little bees take on enormous hornets

I wrote a comic about Japanese Honeybees and how they combat Japanese Giant Hornets.

View
25 Sep 14:20

A few hours after the site went live. Client: I don’t see us on the Google. Shouldn’t the Google be...

A few hours after the site went live.

Client: I don’t see us on the Google. Shouldn’t the Google be impressed with my website??

Me: No matter what we do, it still takes time to index. The site should start appearing within a month or so. Your brand is very unique.

Client: That’s not fast enough. Should I call the Google?

Me: …You can try.

24 Sep 19:00

Nicknames ‘R’ Us

by Steve Napierski
Nicknames 'R' Us Sterling was originally going to call her "Beefy," but chose to go with "Muscles" at the last moment. I think he made the right choice.



See more: Nicknames ‘R’ Us
24 Sep 22:29

First LEGO Minecraft Minifig Scale Set Spotted In The Wild

by Tomas
kate

Okay yeah I'm 5. Kockamania made me giggle.

LEGO Minecraft 21113 1

Though the sets haven’t been officially announced and we don’t have an official release date yet, it appears to be that a lucky few have been able to get their hands on the new LEGO Minecraft Minifigure Scale sets. Some of these lucky few were the team over at Kockamania.hu who were able to get their hands on the new 21113 The Cave set.

Since we already have seen images of the box and set before, there really isn’t much to report about this. However, I would like to bring your attention to the back side of the box. This is the first time we ever have a glimpse at the back of a minifig scale Minecraft set, and as you can see at the bottom of the box, we’ll be getting four different types of brick-built ores and a TNT block. Also, it seems to be that the instruction manuals will once again have inspirational ideas as they used to have back in the day. It kinda makes sense that LEGO is doing this since Minecraft is all about building what you imagination is capable of coming up with, but it would be nice to see the inspiration ideas on other non-Minecraft sets.

LEGO Minecraft 21113 2

Though we are not sure about this, we are expecting to get more information about these new Minecraft sets at the 2014 New York Comic Con. In the meantime, go ahead and share your thoughts on the comments below!

The post First LEGO Minecraft Minifig Scale Set Spotted In The Wild appeared first on Groove Bricks.

25 Sep 12:30

To celebrate the upcoming 20th anniversary of popular Japanese racing series Initial D, LEGO enthusi

by Gergo Vas

To celebrate the upcoming 20th anniversary of popular Japanese racing series Initial D, LEGO enthusiast Denil Oh created quite a unique set on LEGO Ideas. It's an awesome miniature replica of the iconic Toyota Trueno, the main character Takumi Fujiwara, and his family's tofu shop.

Read more...