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24 Apr 18:00

What's YOUR Spirit Animal?

24 Apr 21:30

Don't They All?

Don't They All?

Submitted by: (via ZeroDivided714)

Tagged: fart , kids , parenting , rainbow , g rated
23 Apr 09:00

Digging around in the legacy code

by sharhalakis

by secondhype

22 Apr 12:45

Working to Make the World Stronger

21 Apr 20:08

Reinventing the Axe

by samzenpus
Nerval's Lobster (2598977) writes "The axe has been with us for thousands of years, with its design changing very little during that time. After all, how much can you really alter a basic blade-and-handle? Well, Finnish inventor Heikki Karna has tried to change it a whole lot, with a new, oddly-shaped axe that he claims is a whole lot safer because it transfers a percentage of downward force into rotational energy, cutting down on deflections. 'The Vipukirves [as the axe is called] still has a sharpened blade at the end, but it has a projection coming off the side that shifts the center of gravity away from the middle. At the point of impact, the edge is driven into the wood and slows down, but the kinetic energy contained in the 1.9 kilogram axe head continues down and to the side (because of the odd center of gravity),' is how Geek.com describes the design. 'The rotational energy actually pushes the wood apart like a lever.' The question is, will everyone pick up on this new way of doing things?"

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21 Apr 20:51

Experiment Suggests Monkeys Can Do Basic Math

by samzenpus
sciencehabit (1205606) writes "It looks like a standardized test question: Is the sum of two numbers on the left or the single number on the right larger? Rhesus macaques that have been trained to associate numerical values with symbols can get the answer right, even if they haven't passed a math class. The finding doesn't just reveal a hidden talent of the animals—it also helps show how the mammalian brain encodes the values of numbers. Previous research has shown that chimpanzees can add single-digit numbers. But scientists haven’t explained exactly how, in the human or the monkey brain, numbers are being represented or this addition is being carried out. Now, a new study (abstract) helps begin to answer those questions."

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22 Apr 00:10

Intentional Backdoor In Consumer Routers Found

by Unknown Lamer
New submitter janoc (699997) writes about a backdoor that was fixed (only not). "Eloi Vanderbeken from Synacktiv has identified an intentional backdoor in a module by Sercomm used by major router manufacturers (Cisco, Linksys, Netgear, etc.). The backdoor was ostensibly fixed — by obfuscating it and making it harder to access. The original report (PDF). And yeah, there is an exploit available ..." Rather than actually closing the backdoor, they just altered it so that the service was not enabled until you knocked the portal with a specially crafted Ethernet packet. Quoting Ars Technica: "The nature of the change, which leverages the same code as was used in the old firmware to provide administrative access over the concealed port, suggests that the backdoor is an intentional feature of the firmware ... Because of the format of the packets—raw Ethernet packets, not Internet Protocol packets—they would need to be sent from within the local wireless LAN, or from the Internet service provider’s equipment. But they could be sent out from an ISP as a broadcast, essentially re-opening the backdoor on any customer’s router that had been patched."

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22 Apr 12:04

GitHub Founder Resigns Following Harassment Investigation

by Unknown Lamer
An anonymous reader writes "Late Yesterday, GitHub concluded its investigation regarding sexual harassment within its work force, and although it found no evidence of 'legal wrongdoing,' Tom Preston-Werner, one of its founding members implicated in the investigation resigned. In its statement, GitHub vows to implement 'a number of new HR and employee-led initiatives as well as training opportunities to make sure employee concerns and conflicts are taken seriously and dealt with appropriately.' Julie Ann Horvath, the former GitHub employee whose public resignation last month inspired the sexual harassment investigation, found the company's findings to be gratuitous and just plain wrong."

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23 Apr 10:25

'The Door Problem' of Game Design

by Soulskill
An anonymous reader writes "Game design is one of those jobs everybody thinks they can do. After all, they've played a few games, and they know what they liked and disliked, right? How hard could it be? Well, professional game designer Liz England has summed up the difficulty of the job and the breadth of knowledge needed to do it in what she calls 'the door problem.' Quoting: 'Premise: You are making a game. Are there doors in your game? Can the player open them? Can the player open every door in the game? What tells a player a door is locked and will open, as opposed to a door that they will never open? What happens if there are two players? Does it only lock after both players pass through the door? What if the level is REALLY BIG and can't all exist at the same time?' This is just a few of the questions that need answering. She then goes through how other employees in the company respond to the issue, often complicating it. 'Network Programmer: "Do all the players need to see the door open at the same time?" Release Engineer: "You need to get your doors in by 3pm if you want them on the disk." Producer: "Do we need to give everyone those doors or can we save them for a pre-order bonus?"'"

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23 Apr 12:50

Face Recognition Algorithm Finally Outperforms Humans

by Unknown Lamer
KentuckyFC (1144503) writes "Face recognition has come a long way in recent years. In ideal lighting conditions, given the same pose, facial expression etc, it easily outperforms humans. But the real world isn't like that. People grow beards, wear make up and glasses, make strange faces and so on, which makes the task of facial recognition tricky even for humans. A well-known photo database called Labelled Faces in the Wild captures much of this variation. It consists of 13,000 face images of almost 6000 public figures collected off the web. When images of the same person are paired, humans can correctly spot matches and mismatches 97.53 per cent of the time. By comparison, face recognition algorithms have never come close to this. Now a group of computer scientists have developed a new algorithm called GaussianFace that outperforms humans in this task for the first time. The algorithm normalises each face into a 150 x 120 pixel image by transforming it based on five image landmarks: the position of both eyes, the nose and the two corners of the mouth. After being trained on a wide variety of images in advance, it can then compare faces looking for similarities. It does this with an accuracy of 98.52 per cent; the first time an algorithm has beaten human-level performance in such challenging real-world conditions. You can test yourself on some of the image pairs on the other side of the link."

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18 Apr 19:00

A Brief History of Beer

by Kathy Padden - Today I Found Out

A Brief History of Beer

Beer brewing and drinking are activities that have been part of the human experience seemingly since the dawn of civilization. Around 10,000 years ago, mankind began to move away from living life as nomadic hunter gatherers, and began settling down in one spot to farm the land. Grain, a vital ingredient in beer making, was cultivated by these new agricultural societies.

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20 Apr 12:00

Relying on the Internet to Teach You How to Date

Relying on the Internet to Teach You How to Date

Submitted by: (via Unknown)

20 Apr 16:30

The Chemistry Teacher Was Never Seen Again

20 Apr 22:00

The Dark Knight Reads

21 Apr 17:30

Go For It

17 Apr 00:00

Jef Raskin

"Imagine if every Thursday your shoes exploded if you tied them the usual way. This happens to us all the time with computers, and nobody thinks of complaining."
18 Apr 00:00

Demetri Martin

"I bought a cactus. A week later it died. And I got depressed, because I thought, Damn. I am less nurturing than a desert."
17 Apr 18:21

ANATHEMA обявиха списъка с песни на предстоящия си албум (17.04.2014)

   ANATHEMA ще издадат новия си студиен албум, "Distant Satellites", на 10 юни чрез "Kscope Records". Материалът за творбата е записан в Норвегия с
21 Apr 13:39

"Empire of the Undead" на GAMMA RAY с най-висока позиция в германската класация (21.04.2014)

   Новоиздаденият албум на GAMMA RAY "Empire of the Undead" зае 13-а позиция в класа
16 Apr 02:05

How 'DevOps' Is Killing the Developer

by Soulskill
An anonymous reader writes "Python guru Jeff Knupp writes about his frustration with the so-called 'DevOps' movement, an effort to blend development jobs with operations positions. It's an artifact of startup culture, and while it might make sense when you only have a few employees and a focus on simply getting it running rather than getting it running right, Knupp feels it has no place in bigger, more established companies. He says, 'Somewhere along the way, however, we tricked ourselves into thinking that because, at any one time, a start-up developer had to take on different roles he or she should actually be all those things at once. If such people even existed, "full-stack" developers still wouldn't be used as they should. Rather than temporarily taking on a single role for a short period of time, then transitioning into the next role, they are meant to be performing all the roles, all the time. And here's what really sucks: most good developers can almost pull this off.' Knupp adds, 'The effect of all of this is to destroy the role of "developer" and replace it with a sort of "technology utility-player". Every developer I know got into programming because they actually enjoyed doing it (at one point). You do a disservice to everyone involved when you force your brightest people to take on additional roles.'"

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15 Apr 21:30

German Was Always Such a Romantic Language

15 Apr 22:00

The Eternal Debate

15 Apr 12:16

Dyson's Massive Floating Trash Vacuum Could Clean Up Our Rivers

by Gary Cutlack - GIzmodo UK

Dyson's Massive Floating Trash Vacuum Could Clean Up Our Rivers

James Dyson's has an idea for a new form of sucking machine—one so large it requires an entire barge to house it.

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15 Apr 12:30

Amazing Arcade Flight Simulator Spins Players Completely Upside-Down

by Andrew Liszewski

Amazing Arcade Flight Simulator Spins Players Completely Upside-Down

The arcades that dominated the 1980s and 1990s slowly died off as home video game consoles became more and more capable, but there are apparently still some good reasons to keep a pocket full of quarters handy. Namely this arcade simulator for a game called War Thunder that puts Afterburner to shame.

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15 Apr 00:00

8 Bizarre Cases of Internet Searches Used as Evidence

Watch out! What you Google can and will be used against you in the court.
14 Apr 22:10

Heartbleed Disclosure Timeline Revealed

by samzenpus
bennyboy64 (1437419) writes "Ever since the Heartbleed flaw in OpenSSL was made public there have been various questions about who knew what and when. The Sydney Morning Herald has done some analysis of public mailing lists and talked to those involved with disclosing the bug to get the bottom of it. The newspaper finds that Google discovered Heartbleed on or before March 21 and notified OpenSSL on April 1. Other key dates include Finnish security testing firm Codenomicon discovering the flaw independently of Google at 23:30 PDT, April 3. SuSE, Debian, FreeBSD and AltLinux all got a heads up from Red Hat about the flaw in the early hours of April 7 — a few hours before it was made public. Ubuntu, Gentoo and Chromium attempted to get a heads up by responding to an email with few details about it but didn't, as the guy at Red Hat sending the disclosure messages out in India went to bed. By the time he woke up, Codenomicon had reported the bug to OpenSSL."

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15 Apr 00:05

Saturn May Have Given Birth To a Baby Moon

by Unknown Lamer
astroengine (1577233) writes "NASA's Saturn-orbiting Cassini spacecraft has imaged something peculiar on the outermost edge of the gas giant's A-ring. A bright knot, or arc, has been spotted 20 percent brighter than the surrounding ring material and astronomers are interpreting it as a gravitational disturbance caused by a tiny moon. "We have not seen anything like this before," said Carl Murray of Queen Mary University of London. 'We may be looking at the act of birth, where this object is just leaving the rings and heading off to be a moon in its own right.'"

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11 Apr 19:26

ASTRAL DOORS записват нов албум, планират да го издадат през август (11.04.2014)

   ASTRAL DOORS са започнали записи за седмия си дългосвирещ албум, който планират да издадат през август. Творбата е с работно заглавие "Notes Fro
11 Apr 19:20

This House Hasn't Been Redecorated Since The 60s And It's For Sale

by Adam Clark Estes

This House Hasn't Been Redecorated Since The 60s And It's For Sale

A 96-year old Toronto woman is finally moving out of her quaint little house. The story isn't anything out of the ordinary—until you realize that she's lived there for 72 years and apparently hasn't redecorated once. Oh, and she has amazing taste.

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11 Apr 22:00

What Every Escalator Needs