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16 Sep 00:00

10 Unbelievable Stories of Booing

Here are some extreme examples of when cheers turn into jeers.
15 Sep 19:55

Artificial Spleen Removes Ebola, HIV Viruses and Toxins From Blood Using Magnets

by samzenpus
concertina226 writes Harvard scientists have invented a new artificial spleen that is able to clear toxins, fungi and deadly pathogens such as Ebola from human blood, which could potentially save millions of lives. When antibiotics are used to kill them, dying viruses release toxins in the blood that begin to multiply quickly, causing sepsis, a life-threatening condition whereby the immune system overreacts, causing blood clotting, organ damage and inflammation. To overcome this, researchers have invented a "biospleen", a device similar to a dialysis machine that makes use of magnetic nanobeads measuring 128 nanometres in diameter (one-five hundredths the width of a single human hair) coated with mannose-binding lectin (MBL), a type of genetically engineered human blood protein.

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16 Sep 02:05

Schizophrenia Is Not a Single Disease

by Soulskill
An anonymous reader writes: New research from Washington University has found that the condition known as schizophrenia is not just a single disease, but instead a collection of eight different disorders. For years, researchers struggled to understand the genetic basis of schizophrenia. This new method was able to isolate and identify the different conditions (each with its own symptoms) currently classified under the same heading (abstract, full text). "In some patients with hallucinations or delusions, for example, the researchers matched distinct genetic features to patients' symptoms, demonstrating that specific genetic variations interacted to create a 95 percent certainty of schizophrenia. In another group, they found that disorganized speech and behavior were specifically associated with a set of DNA variations that carried a 100 percent risk of schizophrenia." According to one of the study's authors, "By identifying groups of genetic variations and matching them to symptoms in individual patients, it soon may be possible to target treatments to specific pathways that cause problems."

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15 Sep 19:30

We're Done With Doge Now, Everyone Go Home

We're Done With Doge Now, Everyone Go Home

Submitted by: (via jamiew)

15 Sep 14:04

MIT's Robot Cheetah Now Runs Free Without Cables Or a Leash

by Andrew Liszewski

MIT's Robot Cheetah Now Runs Free Without Cables Or a Leash

A lot of robots in development are able to perform amazing feats in a laboratory setting when they've got plenty of tethers and cables keeping them perpetually powered and safe. The real test of their capabilities is when they're forced to explore and interact in a real-world environment, like the robot cheetah that researchers at MIT are developing, which recently took its first untethered steps outside.

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14 Sep 18:15

Brains may 'resist Alzheimer's'

A small study suggests some people's brains may have the ability to resist early Alzheimer's damage.
14 Sep 14:00

A Smartphone Sidewalk Pops Up on a Busy Street in China

by Darren Orf

A Smartphone Sidewalk Pops Up on a Busy Street in China

Back in mid-July, a two-way walking lane appeared in Washington, D.C. One side was a dedicated path for smartphone users and the other for people not hunched over their devices.

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12 Sep 20:30

Better Order Two, Then

Better Order Two, Then

Submitted by: (via darthbaloo)

Tagged: beer , menu , after 12 , potato , Ireland , g rated
09 Sep 23:23

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12 Sep 00:00

10 Famous People Who Make Horrible Art

These people may be well-known for one thing or the other, but that does NOT make them an artist. Take a look and you'll see what we mean.
12 Sep 00:00

David Coblitz

"A committee can make a decision that is dumber than any of its members."
11 Sep 10:49

How to delete your free U2 album

Apple gave all iTunes users a free copy of U2's new album with the iPhone 6 launch. Don't want it? Find out how to bin it here.
11 Sep 18:08

'Giant swimming dinosaur' unearthed

A giant fossil, unearthed in the Sahara desert, has given scientists an unprecedented look at Spinosaurus - the largest-known carnivorous dinosaur.
11 Sep 15:38

Link Between Salt and High Blood Pressure 'Overstated'

by Soulskill
An anonymous reader writes: Diagnosed with high blood pressure? If so, you were probably told to moderate or avoid the use salt in your food. Well, a new study (abstract found that salt is not associated with systolic blood pressure after controlling for other factors. The study found that BMI, age, and alcohol consumption all strongly influenced blood pressure, and concluded that maintaining a healthy body weight was the best way to counteract it. The publication of this research follows a CDC report from Tuesday decrying the amount of salt in children's diets — a report that lists high blood pressure as one of its main concerns. The debate on this issue is far from over, and it'll take years to sort out all the contradictory evidence.

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11 Sep 00:00

Blaise Pascal

"I have discovered that all human evil comes from this, man's being unable to sit still in a room."
10 Sep 02:21

Sleeping pills 'linked to dementia'

Long-term use of pills for anxiety and sleep problems may be linked to Alzheimer's, research suggests.
10 Sep 23:49

'Signs of recovery' in ozone layer

The ozone layer around the earth is showing its first sign of thickening after years of steady depletion, a UN team says.
10 Sep 13:00

14 Underground Structures That Expose the World Beneath Our Feet

by Jordan Kushins

14 Underground Structures That Expose the World Beneath Our Feet

From filthy punk clubs to pristine public transport, there's a heck of a lot going on under our cities. Underground: The Spectacle of the Invisible at Zurich's Museum of Design goes deep into the different types of urban infrastructure that have been built up down below, and the different reasons that being subterranean just makes more sense.

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10 Sep 00:00

9 Shocking Documentaries

In the case of these 9 amazing films, truth is definitely much stranger than fiction.
09 Sep 13:06

Breakfast Topic: Draenei sans culottes

by (Matthew Rossi)
You never know what you're going to get.

A few years back we had the orc shoulder bug. It was a huge (well, in a way) bug for a lot of players, since their characters now suddenly had teeny tiny shoulders. This is not to be confused with tauren shrinkage, which was deliberate and not a bug. Now, up until yesterday's patch, we had draenei suddenly running around with no pants... and no legs, either. So not as exciting as one might have thought. Come on, I know you all want to see draenei without pants on.

Anyway, this is just me remembering bugs great and small from across beta and live. Got anything you remember fondly, or chuckle at derisively?

Filed under: Breakfast Topics

Breakfast Topic: Draenei sans culottes originally appeared on WoW Insider on Tue, 09 Sep 2014 09:00:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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08 Sep 19:00

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08 Sep 14:00

Awkward Cousins

by Anthony Colangelo

As an industry, we’re historically terrible at drawing lines between things. We try to segment devices based on screen size, but that doesn’t take into account hardware functionality, form factor, and usage context, for starters. The laptop I’m writing this on has the same resolution as a 1080p television. They’d be lumped into the same screen-size–dependent groups, but they are two totally different device classes, so how do we determine what goes together?

That’s a simple example, but it points to a larger issue. We so desperately want to draw lines between things, but there are often too many variables to make those lines clean.

Why, then, do we draw such strict lines between our roles on projects? What does the area of overlap between a designer and front-end developer look like? A front- and back-end developer? A designer and back-end developer? The old thinking of defined roles is certainly loosening up, but we still have a long way to go.

The chasm between roles that is most concerning is the one between web designers/developers and native application designers/developers. We often choose a camp early on and stick to it, which is a mindset that may have been fueled by the false “native vs. web” battle a few years ago. It was positioned as an either-or decision, and hybrid approaches were looked down upon.

The two camps of creators are drifting farther and farther apart, even as the products are getting closer and closer. John Gruber best described the overlap that users see:

When I’m using Tweetbot, for example, much of my time in the app is spent reading web pages rendered in a web browser. Surely that’s true of mobile Facebook users, as well. What should that count as, “app” or “web”?

I publish a website, but tens of thousands of my most loyal readers consume it using RSS apps. What should they count as, “app” or “web”?.

The people using the things we build don’t see the divide as harshly as we do, if at all. More importantly, the development environments are becoming more similar, as well. Swift, Apple’s brand new programming language for iOS and Mac development, has a strong resemblance to the languages we know and love on the web, and that’s no accident. One of Apple’s top targets for Swift, if not the top target, is the web development community. It’s a massive, passionate, and talented pool of developers who, largely, have not done iOS or Mac work—yet.

As someone who spans the divide regularly, it’s sad to watch these two communities keep at arm’s length like awkward cousins at a family reunion. We have so much in common—interests, skills, core values, and a ton of technological ancestry. The difference between the things we build is shrinking in the minds of our shared users, and the ways we build those things are aligning. I dream of the day when we get over our poorly drawn lines and become the big, happy community I know we can be.

At the very least, please start reading each other’s blogs.

08 Sep 13:00

Give it a Test Run!

Give it a Test Run!

Submitted by: (via jpmaje2)

08 Sep 11:54

Amazing video of a man holding a glider while flying on another glider

by Jesus Diaz on Sploid, shared by Jesus Diaz to Gizmodo

Amazing video of a man holding a glider while flying on another glider

This photo and video of a daredevil from the Red Bull Skydiving team holding a glider while riding another glider makes me giddy with joy and excitement. First, because it's simply amazing—one stunning, extremely difficult stunt that they executed perfectly.

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08 Sep 09:56

All we know about one of the strangest objects in the Universe

by Jesus Diaz on Sploid, shared by Jesus Diaz to Gizmodo

All we know about one of the strangest objects in the Universe

Neutron stars. They are so strange that we can barely wrap our heads around the idea of their existence. In fact, we still don't really know most things about them, so we can only guess and wonder trying to explain their extreme properties. This video explains all we know—or suppose—about them.

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08 Sep 09:45

Part of an Asteroid Set to Skim Earth Fell and Made a Big Crater

by Jamie Condliffe

Part of an Asteroid Set to Skim Earth Fell and Made a Big Crater

An asteroid known as 2014 RC was due to skim past our planet over the weekend . But instead of passing by in the distance, it's believed part of the rock fell to earth in Nicaragua creating a gigantic crater.

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08 Sep 00:00

Barbara Tober

"Traditions are group efforts to keep the unexpected from happening."
08 Sep 06:05

Restoring Salmon To Their Original Habitat -- With a Cannon

by timothy
StartsWithABang writes Hydroelectric dams are one of the best and oldest sources of green, renewable energy, but — as the Three Gorges Dam in China exemplifies — they often cause a host of environmental and ecological problems and challenges. One of the more interesting ones is how to coax fish upstream in the face of these herculean walls that can often span more than 500 feet in height. While fish ladders might be a solution for some of the smaller dams, they're limited in application and success. Could Whooshh Innovations' Salmon Cannon, a pneumatic tube capable of launching fish up-and-over these dams, finally restore the Columbia River salmon to their original habitats?

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07 Sep 23:58

Apparent Meteorite Hits Managua, Nicaragua, Leaving Crater But No Injuries

by timothy
A wire report from AFP says that an explosion heard in Managua last night, and a 40-foot crater evident today, are evidence that the city was the impact site for a small meteorite that struck Saturday night. The photos are not very exciting at a glance, which is a good thing, considering that a dirt crater and no injuries is probably the best outcome if a meteorite strikes the city where you live. From the article: The meteorite appeared to have hurtled into a wooded area near the airport around midnight Saturday, its thunderous impact felt across the capital. The hit was so large that it registered on the instruments Strauss’ organization uses to size up earthquakes. “You can see two waves: first, a small seismic wave when the meteorite hit Earth, and then another stronger one, which is the impact of the sound,” he said. Government officials and experts visited the impact site on Sunday. One of them, William Martínez, said it was not yet clear if the meteorite burned up completely or if it had been blasted into the soil. “You can see mirror-like spots on the sides of the crater from where the meteorite power-scraped the walls,” Martínez said. (The same news, in slightly shorter form, from the AP.)

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07 Sep 14:26

New DNA Analysis On Old Blood Pegs Aaron Kosminski As Jack the Ripper

by timothy
It surely won't be the last theory offered, but a century and a quarter after the notorious crimes of Jack the Ripper, an "armchair detective" has employed DNA analysis on the blood-soaked shawl of one of the Ripper's victims, and has declared it in a new book an unambiguous match with Jewish immigrant Aaron Kosminski, long considered a suspect. Kosminski died in 1919 in an insane asylum. The landmark discovery was made after businessman Russell Edwards, 48, bought the shawl at auction and enlisted the help of Dr Jari Louhelainen, a world-renowned expert in analysing genetic evidence from historical crime scenes. Using cutting-edge techniques, Dr Louhelainen was able to extract 126-year-old DNA from the material and compare it to DNA from descendants of [Ripper victim Catherine] Eddowes and the suspect, with both proving a perfect match. (Also at The Independent.) It's not the first time DNA evidence has been used to try to pin down the identity of Jack the Ripper, but the claimed results in this case are far less ambiguous than another purported mitochondrial DNA connection promoted by crime novelist Patricia Cornwell in favor of artist Walter Sickert as the killer in a 2002 book. Update: 09/07 16:03 GMT by T : Corrected Sickert's first name, originally misstated as "William."

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