Shared posts

31 Jul 12:41

Controllers: Photos by Javier Laspiur

by Jason Jose










Controllers: Photos by Javier Laspiur

Photo series showing the evolution of the handheld controller starting when the photographer first played video game consoles in 1983.
31 Jul 06:03

St. Mark’s Bookshop

28 Jul 16:57

Artist Isaac Cordal Leaves Miniature Cement Skeletons on the Streets of Mexico

by Christopher Jobson

Artist Isaac Cordal Leaves Miniature Cement Skeletons on the Streets of Mexico street art sculpture miniature Mexico cement

Artist Isaac Cordal Leaves Miniature Cement Skeletons on the Streets of Mexico street art sculpture miniature Mexico cement

Artist Isaac Cordal Leaves Miniature Cement Skeletons on the Streets of Mexico street art sculpture miniature Mexico cement

Artist Isaac Cordal Leaves Miniature Cement Skeletons on the Streets of Mexico street art sculpture miniature Mexico cement

Artist Isaac Cordal Leaves Miniature Cement Skeletons on the Streets of Mexico street art sculpture miniature Mexico cement

Artist Isaac Cordal Leaves Miniature Cement Skeletons on the Streets of Mexico street art sculpture miniature Mexico cement

Artist Isaac Cordal Leaves Miniature Cement Skeletons on the Streets of Mexico street art sculpture miniature Mexico cement

Artist Isaac Cordal Leaves Miniature Cement Skeletons on the Streets of Mexico street art sculpture miniature Mexico cement

Artist Isaac Cordal Leaves Miniature Cement Skeletons on the Streets of Mexico street art sculpture miniature Mexico cement

Artist Isaac Cordal (previously) is well-known for his creation and placement of miniature cement figures in public places around the world as part of an ongoing series called Cement Eclipses. While the meaning behind each tiny sculpture is intentionally ambiguous, it’s impossible to look at each piece without imagining a story. The pieces often appear in scenes of mourning or despair, as part of what Cordal says is commentary on humankind’s disregard for nature and as foreshadowing of potential consequences. From his artist statement:

Isaac Cordal is sympathetic toward his little people and you can empathize with their situations, their leisure time, their waiting for buses and even their more tragic moments such as accidental death, suicide or family funerals. The sculptures can be found in gutters, on top of buildings, on top of bus shelters; in many unusual and unlikely places.

These new skeletal works are part of a 2013 series he created in Chiapas, Mexico, and he also had work this summer at ArtScape 2014 in Sweden. You can see more over on Facebook. (via Supersonic)

27 Jul 12:52

Photographer Captures Perfect Shadow of Mt. Fuji at Sunrise

by Christopher Jobson

Photographer Captures Perfect Shadow of Mt. Fuji at Sunrise shadows Mt. Fuji mountains Japan

While climbing Mt. Fuji in 2012, photographer Kris J B managed to capture this crystal clear shot of the mountain’s shadow at sunrise. The 12,388 ft. Fuji is notoriously shy and is often obscured by low hanging clouds or fog. This was the photographer’s 4th attempt to climb the mountain, an ascent in 2011 left him with a tantalizing, but ultimately unsatisfactory photograph of the mountain’s perfectly triangular shadow stretching out toward the horizon. In 2012 he arrived prepared and returned with this amazing shot.

After posting it online two years ago, K B’s image spread like wildfire and he quickly lost control of his rights. The photo was used widely without his permission, a story he recently shared with PetaPixel. K B now lives and works in England, and you can follow more of his photography on his website and over on Facebook. Image courtesy the photographer.

25 Jul 13:34

Reflections: Paintings by Richard Combes

by Jason Jose






Reflections: Paintings by Richard Combes
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Paintings of buildings reflected on standing water in the streets of New York.
Through his meticulous rendering of detail and dramatic use of perspective and colour, Combes explores the relationship between architecture and the human form, transforming everyday objects and situations into extraordinary images that are absorbing and often haunting.
24 Jul 03:59

Today’s French lesson

24 Jul 23:45

Giddy up

25 Jul 21:18

Dorkly

25 Jul 16:17

Artist Hubert Duprat Collaborates with Caddisfly Larvae as They Build Aquatic Cocoons from Gold and Pearls

by Christopher Jobson

Artist Hubert Duprat Collaborates with Caddisfly Larvae as They Build Aquatic Cocoons from Gold and Pearls jewelry insects gold
Trichoptera (caddis larva) building case (studio view), 1980-2000. Material: Gold, pearls, turquoise. Length: 2.5 cm. Photographer: Frédéric Delpech. Image courtesy of the artist and Art:Concept gallery, Paris and MONA Museum of Old and New Art.

Artist Hubert Duprat Collaborates with Caddisfly Larvae as They Build Aquatic Cocoons from Gold and Pearls jewelry insects gold

Right now, in almost every river in the world, some 12,000 different species of caddisfly larvae wriggle and crawl through sediment, twigs, and rocks in an attempt to build temporary aquatic cocoons. To do this, the small, slow-moving creatures excrete silk from salivary glands near their mouths which they use like mortar to stick together almost every available material into a cozy tube. A few weeks later a fully developed caddisfly emerges and almost immediately flies away.

After first learning about caddisflies, self-taught (and self-professed amateur) artist Hubert Duprat had a thought. Had a caddisfly ever naturally encountered a fleck of gold in a river and used it to build a home? And then one step further: what if a caddisfly had only gold and other precious stones or jewels to work with?

Trichoptères, French for the scientific name of the caddisfly, is Duprat’s answer to that question. For years the artist has been collaborating with the tiny insects, providing them small aquariums of gold, turquoise and pearls that the the larvae readily use to construct their temporary homes. Regardless of how creepy crawly you might find the insects, it’s impossible to deny the strange beauty of the final product, tiny gold sculptures held together with silk. Encountering them void of any context, one would assume they were constructed by a jeweler.

Duprat currently has a solo exhibition at the Museum of Old and New Art in Tasmania which runs through July 28th, and it should be notced thath is work with caddisflies is only one small aspect of his art practice.

Artist Hubert Duprat Collaborates with Caddisfly Larvae as They Build Aquatic Cocoons from Gold and Pearls jewelry insects gold
Trichoptera larva with case, 1980-2000. Material: gold and pearls. Dimension: 0.5 x 1.9 cm. Photographer: Frédéric Delpech. Image courtesy of the artist and Art:Concept gallery, Paris and MONA Museum of Old and New Art.

Artist Hubert Duprat Collaborates with Caddisfly Larvae as They Build Aquatic Cocoons from Gold and Pearls jewelry insects gold
Trichoptera larva with case, 1980-2000. Material: gold and pearls. Dimension: 0.5 x 1.9 cm. Photographer: Frédéric Delpech. Image courtesy of the artist and Art:Concept gallery, Paris and MONA Museum of Old and New Art.

Artist Hubert Duprat Collaborates with Caddisfly Larvae as They Build Aquatic Cocoons from Gold and Pearls jewelry insects gold
Trichoptera (caddis larva) case. Photographer: Fabrice Gousset.

Artist Hubert Duprat Collaborates with Caddisfly Larvae as They Build Aquatic Cocoons from Gold and Pearls jewelry insects gold
Trichoptera (caddis larva) case on pedestal. Photographer: Fabrice Gousset.

Artist Hubert Duprat Collaborates with Caddisfly Larvae as They Build Aquatic Cocoons from Gold and Pearls jewelry insects gold
Trichoptera (caddis larva) case. Photographer: Fabrice Gousset.

Artist Hubert Duprat Collaborates with Caddisfly Larvae as They Build Aquatic Cocoons from Gold and Pearls jewelry insects gold
Trichoptera (caddis larva) case on pedestal. Photographer: Fabrice Gousset.

Artist Hubert Duprat Collaborates with Caddisfly Larvae as They Build Aquatic Cocoons from Gold and Pearls jewelry insects gold
Trichoptera (caddis larva) case. Photographer: Fabrice Gousset.

Artist Hubert Duprat Collaborates with Caddisfly Larvae as They Build Aquatic Cocoons from Gold and Pearls jewelry insects gold
Trichoptera (caddis larva) case on pedestal. Photographer: Fabrice Gousset.

Artist Hubert Duprat Collaborates with Caddisfly Larvae as They Build Aquatic Cocoons from Gold and Pearls jewelry insects gold

Artist Hubert Duprat Collaborates with Caddisfly Larvae as They Build Aquatic Cocoons from Gold and Pearls jewelry insects gold

A huge thank you to the Museum of Old and New Art and photographer Fabrice Gousset for providing the images for this post. If you liked this, don’t miss the work of (via ARTREBELS)

25 Jul 19:53

Paper Play: A New Book About the Art of Papercraft from Gingko Press

by Christopher Jobson

Paper Play: A New Book About the Art of Papercraft from Gingko Press paper books
Lucie Houdkova

Paper Play: A New Book About the Art of Papercraft from Gingko Press paper books
Andrée-Anne Dupuis-Bourret

Paper Play: A New Book About the Art of Papercraft from Gingko Press paper books
Marine Coutroutsios

Paper Play: A New Book About the Art of Papercraft from Gingko Press paper books
Alexander Korzer-Robinson

Paper Play: A New Book About the Art of Papercraft from Gingko Press paper books
Geraldine Gonzalez

Paper Play: A New Book About the Art of Papercraft from Gingko Press paper books
Mia Pearlman

Paper Play: A New Book About the Art of Papercraft from Gingko Press paper books
Cecilia Levy

Paper Play: A New Book About the Art of Papercraft from Gingko Press paper books

Just published by Gingko Press, Paper Play is a new 256-page book exploring the use of paper in contemporary art and design. The book features no less than 82 designers and artists who use paper in sculptures, jewelry, street art, installations and everything else you can imagine. I started listing out all the artists we’ve featured here on the Colossal who are included in the book, but it got a bit unwieldy after a dozen. Pick it up here.

23 Jul 02:08

Are you ready for marriage? (1970)

23 Jul 15:27

Hidden Geometric Patterns Gradually Revealed inside Giant Chocolate Cylinder

by Christopher Jobson

Hidden Geometric Patterns Gradually Revealed inside Giant Chocolate Cylinder geometric food chocolate

Hidden Geometric Patterns Gradually Revealed inside Giant Chocolate Cylinder geometric food chocolate

Hidden Geometric Patterns Gradually Revealed inside Giant Chocolate Cylinder geometric food chocolate

Hidden Geometric Patterns Gradually Revealed inside Giant Chocolate Cylinder geometric food chocolate

Hidden Geometric Patterns Gradually Revealed inside Giant Chocolate Cylinder geometric food chocolate

Hidden Geometric Patterns Gradually Revealed inside Giant Chocolate Cylinder geometric food chocolate

Hidden Geometric Patterns Gradually Revealed inside Giant Chocolate Cylinder geometric food chocolate

Hidden Geometric Patterns Gradually Revealed inside Giant Chocolate Cylinder geometric food chocolate

Hidden Geometric Patterns Gradually Revealed inside Giant Chocolate Cylinder geometric food chocolate

For a major retrospective of Dutch furniture designer and architect Gerrit Rietveld, the team at Studio Wieki Somers collaborated with chocolatier Rafael Mutter to create Chocolate Mill. The piece was comprised of a giant cylindrical chocolate block that was carefully organized in 10 stacked layers, with flavored shapes used to create different geometric patterns. As a crank-turned blade similar to a cheese slicer grazed shavings off the top, the hidden layers were slowly revealed. You can watch a timelapse of the piece in the video above. (via Designboom, Design You Trust)

18 Jul 04:10

Don’t you want to be happy?

18 Jul 07:21

Calvin and Hobbes

14 Jul 17:33

Modern Toss

15 Jul 03:15

le Tour, Tim George



le Tour, Tim George

17 Jul 18:20

Hedi Xadt

17 Jul 18:58

Daniel Danger

17 Jul 20:08

John Dunfee


instagram @johndunfee


instagram @johndunfee


instagram @johndunfee

John Dunfee

16 Jul 22:33

Distance Over Time

by Jason Kottke

In his mid-20s, James Golding was diagnosed with cancer. In the hospital, he weighed 84 pounds and was given a 5% chance of living. Five years later, he embarked on a journey to France to break the record for most distance ridden on a bike in 7 days. This video follows Golding through his record-breaking attempt.

The video was produced by the same team that did the lovely Experiments in Speed video.

Tags: cancer   cycling   James Golding   video
16 Jul 15:45

Dramatic Stainless Steel Wire Fairies by Robin Wight

by Christopher Jobson

Dramatic Stainless Steel Wire Fairies by Robin Wight wire sculpture fairies dandelions
Jo Fitzpatrick‎

Dramatic Stainless Steel Wire Fairies by Robin Wight wire sculpture fairies dandelions

Dramatic Stainless Steel Wire Fairies by Robin Wight wire sculpture fairies dandelions

Dramatic Stainless Steel Wire Fairies by Robin Wight wire sculpture fairies dandelions

Dramatic Stainless Steel Wire Fairies by Robin Wight wire sculpture fairies dandelions

Dramatic Stainless Steel Wire Fairies by Robin Wight wire sculpture fairies dandelions

Dramatic Stainless Steel Wire Fairies by Robin Wight wire sculpture fairies dandelions

UK sculptor Robin Wight creates dramatic scenes of wind-blown fairies clutching dandelions, clinging to trees, and seemingly suspended in midair, all with densely wrapped forms of stainless steel wire. The artist currently has several pieces on view at the Trentham Gardens and sells a number of DIY wire sculpting kits from his website where he also discusses in great detail how each piece is built. See more over on Facebook. (via Reddit).

16 Jul 13:21

Artist Recreates Childhood Scribbles as Digital Illustrations Over 20 Years Later

by Christopher Jobson

Artist Recreates Childhood Scribbles as Digital Illustrations Over 20 Years Later   kids illustration humor

Artist Recreates Childhood Scribbles as Digital Illustrations Over 20 Years Later   kids illustration humor

Artist Recreates Childhood Scribbles as Digital Illustrations Over 20 Years Later   kids illustration humor

Artist Recreates Childhood Scribbles as Digital Illustrations Over 20 Years Later   kids illustration humor

Artist Recreates Childhood Scribbles as Digital Illustrations Over 20 Years Later   kids illustration humor

Artist Recreates Childhood Scribbles as Digital Illustrations Over 20 Years Later   kids illustration humor

Artist Recreates Childhood Scribbles as Digital Illustrations Over 20 Years Later   kids illustration humor

Here on Colossal we’ve seen an artist who collaborated with her 4-year-old daughter, transforming her random sketches and scribbles into fully realized artworks. With another take on the child/adult collaborative art genre, Dutch muralist Telmo Pieper did something similar, instead collaborating with his 4-year-old self in his series called Kiddie Arts. The artist took old childhood sketches which he then recreated as digital illustrations by applying realistic light, color, and texture to the hilariously deformed shapes he imagined in his youth.

You can see much more of Pieper’s work on his website and Tumblr. He also collaborates with artist Miel Krutzmann as part of Telmo Miel out of Rotterdam. (via Bored Panda, Laughing Squid)

06 Jul 05:07

Hello

06 Jul 23:38

The last thing

08 Jul 18:45

A Better Security Question

10 Jul 17:35

New Paintings on Salvaged Books by Mike Stilkey

by Christopher Jobson

New Paintings on Salvaged Books by Mike Stilkey painting books

New Paintings on Salvaged Books by Mike Stilkey painting books

New Paintings on Salvaged Books by Mike Stilkey painting books

New Paintings on Salvaged Books by Mike Stilkey painting books

New Paintings on Salvaged Books by Mike Stilkey painting books

New Paintings on Salvaged Books by Mike Stilkey painting books

New Paintings on Salvaged Books by Mike Stilkey painting books

New Paintings on Salvaged Books by Mike Stilkey painting books

New Paintings on Salvaged Books by Mike Stilkey painting books

New Paintings on Salvaged Books by Mike Stilkey painting books

Artist Mike Stilkey uses the covers of books reclaimed from library trash heaps as a canvas for his whimsical paintings. He works with a mix of ink, colored pencil, paint and lacquer to create each artwork that can vary from anthropomorphic animals playing instruments to portraits of men and women inspired by Weimar-era German expressionism. Elements of his playful and at times emotionally exaggerated style have been compared to Edward Gorey and Egon Schiele.

The Los Angeles-based artist credits an immersion in skateboard culture during much of his youth as the beginning of his artistic career, as he simultaneously became exposed to graffiti and street art, though he received no formal training. His work has since been exhibited throughout the United States as well as internationally in galleries, museums, and libraries.

Stilkey most recently had a solo show at Gilman Contemporary in March, and had several pieces on view through BDX-LAX Faraway So Close, a cultural project that promotes contemporary art between sister cities Bordeaux and Los Angeles. You can learn more about his work in this three part video interview from Fully Booked (Part 2, Part 3), add see much more over on Facebook. (via Lustik)

11 Jul 15:47

Humorous Urban Interventions on the Streets of France by OakOak

by Christopher Jobson

Humorous Urban Interventions on the Streets of France by OakOak street art pop culture humor

Humorous Urban Interventions on the Streets of France by OakOak street art pop culture humor

Humorous Urban Interventions on the Streets of France by OakOak street art pop culture humor

Humorous Urban Interventions on the Streets of France by OakOak street art pop culture humor

Humorous Urban Interventions on the Streets of France by OakOak street art pop culture humor

Humorous Urban Interventions on the Streets of France by OakOak street art pop culture humor

Humorous Urban Interventions on the Streets of France by OakOak street art pop culture humor

Humorous Urban Interventions on the Streets of France by OakOak street art pop culture humor

Humorous Urban Interventions on the Streets of France by OakOak street art pop culture humor

Humorous Urban Interventions on the Streets of France by OakOak street art pop culture humor

Based in the old industrial town of St. Etienne, France, street artist oakoak (previously) relies on a keen sense of observation to create his humorous interventions on walls, streets, and sidewalks. Cracks and crumbling infrastructure become the backdrop for superheroes and other pop culture characters who interact with their surrounds in unexpected ways. He shares with Bulkka:

Since I come from Saint Etienne, an old industrial city which is now in reconversion, I have the need to make my city less “grey” and at the same time, funnier. Humor is really important to me. It’s definitely the most important element in what I do.

My main interest is giving importance to places and objects that people don’t notice anymore. I walk a lot every day and that’s how I get to find new attractive places with urban elements such as broken walls for example. When I see something interesting during my walks, I measure it and study it, and I come back later to make the collage. I prefer to prepare the drawings and drafts at home.

Included here are several works from the last 6 months or so, but you can see many more pieces on his Facebook page.

07 Jul 13:34

Animal Murals by Fiona Tang Appear to Leap from Gallery Walls

by Christopher Jobson

Animal Murals by Fiona Tang Appear to Leap from Gallery Walls trompe loeil optical illusion murals drawing animals

Animal Murals by Fiona Tang Appear to Leap from Gallery Walls trompe loeil optical illusion murals drawing animals

Animal Murals by Fiona Tang Appear to Leap from Gallery Walls trompe loeil optical illusion murals drawing animals

Animal Murals by Fiona Tang Appear to Leap from Gallery Walls trompe loeil optical illusion murals drawing animals

Animal Murals by Fiona Tang Appear to Leap from Gallery Walls trompe loeil optical illusion murals drawing animals

Animal Murals by Fiona Tang Appear to Leap from Gallery Walls trompe loeil optical illusion murals drawing animals

Animal Murals by Fiona Tang Appear to Leap from Gallery Walls trompe loeil optical illusion murals drawing animals

Vancouver-based artist Fiona Tang creates large-scale murals of animals using charcoal, chalk pastel, and acrylic on paper that at first glance appear 3D. Tang makes use of a technique called trompe l’oeil where shadows and perspective within the two dimensional drawing are used to trick the viewer into thinking the piece is three dimensional. Tang recently graduated from Emily Carr University of Art and Design, and you can see more of her work over on Facebook. (via Juxtapoz, My Modern Met)

05 Jul 19:26

le Tour


Paul Smith's posters celebrate the Tour de France's arrival in the UK


Paul Smith's posters celebrate the Tour de France's arrival in the UK


Paul Smith's posters celebrate the Tour de France's arrival in the UK

le Tour

04 Jul 04:00

Research Ethics

I mean, it's not like we could just demand to see the code that's governing our lives. What right do we have to poke around in Facebook's private affairs like that?