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23 Jul 02:08

Are you ready for marriage? (1970)

23 Jul 15:27

Hidden Geometric Patterns Gradually Revealed inside Giant Chocolate Cylinder

by Christopher Jobson

Hidden Geometric Patterns Gradually Revealed inside Giant Chocolate Cylinder geometric food chocolate

Hidden Geometric Patterns Gradually Revealed inside Giant Chocolate Cylinder geometric food chocolate

Hidden Geometric Patterns Gradually Revealed inside Giant Chocolate Cylinder geometric food chocolate

Hidden Geometric Patterns Gradually Revealed inside Giant Chocolate Cylinder geometric food chocolate

Hidden Geometric Patterns Gradually Revealed inside Giant Chocolate Cylinder geometric food chocolate

Hidden Geometric Patterns Gradually Revealed inside Giant Chocolate Cylinder geometric food chocolate

Hidden Geometric Patterns Gradually Revealed inside Giant Chocolate Cylinder geometric food chocolate

Hidden Geometric Patterns Gradually Revealed inside Giant Chocolate Cylinder geometric food chocolate

Hidden Geometric Patterns Gradually Revealed inside Giant Chocolate Cylinder geometric food chocolate

For a major retrospective of Dutch furniture designer and architect Gerrit Rietveld, the team at Studio Wieki Somers collaborated with chocolatier Rafael Mutter to create Chocolate Mill. The piece was comprised of a giant cylindrical chocolate block that was carefully organized in 10 stacked layers, with flavored shapes used to create different geometric patterns. As a crank-turned blade similar to a cheese slicer grazed shavings off the top, the hidden layers were slowly revealed. You can watch a timelapse of the piece in the video above. (via Designboom, Design You Trust)

18 Jul 04:10

Don’t you want to be happy?

18 Jul 07:21

Calvin and Hobbes

14 Jul 17:33

Modern Toss

15 Jul 03:15

le Tour, Tim George



le Tour, Tim George

17 Jul 18:20

Hedi Xadt

17 Jul 18:58

Daniel Danger

17 Jul 20:08

John Dunfee


instagram @johndunfee


instagram @johndunfee


instagram @johndunfee

John Dunfee

16 Jul 22:33

Distance Over Time

by Jason Kottke

In his mid-20s, James Golding was diagnosed with cancer. In the hospital, he weighed 84 pounds and was given a 5% chance of living. Five years later, he embarked on a journey to France to break the record for most distance ridden on a bike in 7 days. This video follows Golding through his record-breaking attempt.

The video was produced by the same team that did the lovely Experiments in Speed video.

Tags: cancer   cycling   James Golding   video
16 Jul 15:45

Dramatic Stainless Steel Wire Fairies by Robin Wight

by Christopher Jobson

Dramatic Stainless Steel Wire Fairies by Robin Wight wire sculpture fairies dandelions
Jo Fitzpatrick‎

Dramatic Stainless Steel Wire Fairies by Robin Wight wire sculpture fairies dandelions

Dramatic Stainless Steel Wire Fairies by Robin Wight wire sculpture fairies dandelions

Dramatic Stainless Steel Wire Fairies by Robin Wight wire sculpture fairies dandelions

Dramatic Stainless Steel Wire Fairies by Robin Wight wire sculpture fairies dandelions

Dramatic Stainless Steel Wire Fairies by Robin Wight wire sculpture fairies dandelions

Dramatic Stainless Steel Wire Fairies by Robin Wight wire sculpture fairies dandelions

UK sculptor Robin Wight creates dramatic scenes of wind-blown fairies clutching dandelions, clinging to trees, and seemingly suspended in midair, all with densely wrapped forms of stainless steel wire. The artist currently has several pieces on view at the Trentham Gardens and sells a number of DIY wire sculpting kits from his website where he also discusses in great detail how each piece is built. See more over on Facebook. (via Reddit).

16 Jul 13:21

Artist Recreates Childhood Scribbles as Digital Illustrations Over 20 Years Later

by Christopher Jobson

Artist Recreates Childhood Scribbles as Digital Illustrations Over 20 Years Later   kids illustration humor

Artist Recreates Childhood Scribbles as Digital Illustrations Over 20 Years Later   kids illustration humor

Artist Recreates Childhood Scribbles as Digital Illustrations Over 20 Years Later   kids illustration humor

Artist Recreates Childhood Scribbles as Digital Illustrations Over 20 Years Later   kids illustration humor

Artist Recreates Childhood Scribbles as Digital Illustrations Over 20 Years Later   kids illustration humor

Artist Recreates Childhood Scribbles as Digital Illustrations Over 20 Years Later   kids illustration humor

Artist Recreates Childhood Scribbles as Digital Illustrations Over 20 Years Later   kids illustration humor

Here on Colossal we’ve seen an artist who collaborated with her 4-year-old daughter, transforming her random sketches and scribbles into fully realized artworks. With another take on the child/adult collaborative art genre, Dutch muralist Telmo Pieper did something similar, instead collaborating with his 4-year-old self in his series called Kiddie Arts. The artist took old childhood sketches which he then recreated as digital illustrations by applying realistic light, color, and texture to the hilariously deformed shapes he imagined in his youth.

You can see much more of Pieper’s work on his website and Tumblr. He also collaborates with artist Miel Krutzmann as part of Telmo Miel out of Rotterdam. (via Bored Panda, Laughing Squid)

06 Jul 05:07

Hello

06 Jul 23:38

The last thing

08 Jul 18:45

A Better Security Question

10 Jul 17:35

New Paintings on Salvaged Books by Mike Stilkey

by Christopher Jobson

New Paintings on Salvaged Books by Mike Stilkey painting books

New Paintings on Salvaged Books by Mike Stilkey painting books

New Paintings on Salvaged Books by Mike Stilkey painting books

New Paintings on Salvaged Books by Mike Stilkey painting books

New Paintings on Salvaged Books by Mike Stilkey painting books

New Paintings on Salvaged Books by Mike Stilkey painting books

New Paintings on Salvaged Books by Mike Stilkey painting books

New Paintings on Salvaged Books by Mike Stilkey painting books

New Paintings on Salvaged Books by Mike Stilkey painting books

New Paintings on Salvaged Books by Mike Stilkey painting books

Artist Mike Stilkey uses the covers of books reclaimed from library trash heaps as a canvas for his whimsical paintings. He works with a mix of ink, colored pencil, paint and lacquer to create each artwork that can vary from anthropomorphic animals playing instruments to portraits of men and women inspired by Weimar-era German expressionism. Elements of his playful and at times emotionally exaggerated style have been compared to Edward Gorey and Egon Schiele.

The Los Angeles-based artist credits an immersion in skateboard culture during much of his youth as the beginning of his artistic career, as he simultaneously became exposed to graffiti and street art, though he received no formal training. His work has since been exhibited throughout the United States as well as internationally in galleries, museums, and libraries.

Stilkey most recently had a solo show at Gilman Contemporary in March, and had several pieces on view through BDX-LAX Faraway So Close, a cultural project that promotes contemporary art between sister cities Bordeaux and Los Angeles. You can learn more about his work in this three part video interview from Fully Booked (Part 2, Part 3), add see much more over on Facebook. (via Lustik)

11 Jul 15:47

Humorous Urban Interventions on the Streets of France by OakOak

by Christopher Jobson

Humorous Urban Interventions on the Streets of France by OakOak street art pop culture humor

Humorous Urban Interventions on the Streets of France by OakOak street art pop culture humor

Humorous Urban Interventions on the Streets of France by OakOak street art pop culture humor

Humorous Urban Interventions on the Streets of France by OakOak street art pop culture humor

Humorous Urban Interventions on the Streets of France by OakOak street art pop culture humor

Humorous Urban Interventions on the Streets of France by OakOak street art pop culture humor

Humorous Urban Interventions on the Streets of France by OakOak street art pop culture humor

Humorous Urban Interventions on the Streets of France by OakOak street art pop culture humor

Humorous Urban Interventions on the Streets of France by OakOak street art pop culture humor

Humorous Urban Interventions on the Streets of France by OakOak street art pop culture humor

Based in the old industrial town of St. Etienne, France, street artist oakoak (previously) relies on a keen sense of observation to create his humorous interventions on walls, streets, and sidewalks. Cracks and crumbling infrastructure become the backdrop for superheroes and other pop culture characters who interact with their surrounds in unexpected ways. He shares with Bulkka:

Since I come from Saint Etienne, an old industrial city which is now in reconversion, I have the need to make my city less “grey” and at the same time, funnier. Humor is really important to me. It’s definitely the most important element in what I do.

My main interest is giving importance to places and objects that people don’t notice anymore. I walk a lot every day and that’s how I get to find new attractive places with urban elements such as broken walls for example. When I see something interesting during my walks, I measure it and study it, and I come back later to make the collage. I prefer to prepare the drawings and drafts at home.

Included here are several works from the last 6 months or so, but you can see many more pieces on his Facebook page.

07 Jul 13:34

Animal Murals by Fiona Tang Appear to Leap from Gallery Walls

by Christopher Jobson

Animal Murals by Fiona Tang Appear to Leap from Gallery Walls trompe loeil optical illusion murals drawing animals

Animal Murals by Fiona Tang Appear to Leap from Gallery Walls trompe loeil optical illusion murals drawing animals

Animal Murals by Fiona Tang Appear to Leap from Gallery Walls trompe loeil optical illusion murals drawing animals

Animal Murals by Fiona Tang Appear to Leap from Gallery Walls trompe loeil optical illusion murals drawing animals

Animal Murals by Fiona Tang Appear to Leap from Gallery Walls trompe loeil optical illusion murals drawing animals

Animal Murals by Fiona Tang Appear to Leap from Gallery Walls trompe loeil optical illusion murals drawing animals

Animal Murals by Fiona Tang Appear to Leap from Gallery Walls trompe loeil optical illusion murals drawing animals

Vancouver-based artist Fiona Tang creates large-scale murals of animals using charcoal, chalk pastel, and acrylic on paper that at first glance appear 3D. Tang makes use of a technique called trompe l’oeil where shadows and perspective within the two dimensional drawing are used to trick the viewer into thinking the piece is three dimensional. Tang recently graduated from Emily Carr University of Art and Design, and you can see more of her work over on Facebook. (via Juxtapoz, My Modern Met)

05 Jul 19:26

le Tour


Paul Smith's posters celebrate the Tour de France's arrival in the UK


Paul Smith's posters celebrate the Tour de France's arrival in the UK


Paul Smith's posters celebrate the Tour de France's arrival in the UK

le Tour

04 Jul 04:00

Research Ethics

I mean, it's not like we could just demand to see the code that's governing our lives. What right do we have to poke around in Facebook's private affairs like that?
03 Jul 19:22

Modern toss

03 Jul 19:31

Calvin and Hobbes

02 Jul 19:42

Scientist biography recommendations

by Jason Kottke

Earlier today I asked my Twitter followers for recommendations for "really good" biographies about scientists. I gave Genius (James Gleick's bio of Richard Feynman) and Cleopatra, A Life (not about a scientist but was super interesting and well-written) as examples of what I was looking for. You can see the responses here and I've pulled out a few of the most interesting ones below:

- Isaac Newton by James Gleick. Gleick wrote the aforementioned Genius and Chaos, another favorite of mine. I tried to read The Information last year after many glowing recommendations from friends but couldn't get into it. Someone suggested Never at Rest is a superior Newton bio.

- The Man Who Loved Only Numbers by Paul Hoffman. I've read this biography of mathematician Paul Erdos; highly recommended.

- Galileo's Daughter by Dava Sobel. I've never read anything by Sobel; I'll have to rectify that.

- Einstein: His Life and Universe by Walter Isaacson. I enjoyed his problematic Jobs biography and I notice that he's written one on Ben Franklin as well.

- Alan Turing: The Enigma by Andrew Hodges.

- American Prometheus by Kai Bird and Martin Sherwin. Bio of J. Robert Oppenheimer, leader of the Manhattan Project. See also: The Making of the Atomic Bomb, one of my favorite books ever.

- Everything and More by David Foster Wallace. I've heard Wallace was bit handwavy with the math in this one, but I still enjoyed it.

- Newton and the Counterfeiter by Thomas Levenson. Newton was a detective?

- The Philosophical Breakfast Club by Laura Snyder. Four-way bio of a group of school friends (Charles Babbage, John Herschel, William Whewell, and Richard Jones) who changed the world.

- The Reluctant Mr. Darwin by David Quammen. How Charles Darwin devised his theory of evolution and then sat on it for years is one of science's most fascinating stories.

- T. rex and the Crater of Doom by Walter Alvarez. Not a biography of a person but of a theory: that a meteor impact 65 million years ago caused the extinction of the dinosaurs.

- Walt Disney by Neal Gabler. Disney isn't a scientist, but when you ask for book recommendations and Steven Johnson tells you to read something, it goes on the list.

- The Man Who Knew Infinity by Robert Kanigel. Bio of brilliant Indian mathematician Srinivasa Ramanujan.

- Edge of Objectivity by Charles Gillispie. A biography of modern science published in 1966, all but out of print at this point unfortunately.

- Galileo at Work by Stillman Drake.

- The Age of Wonder by Richard Holmes.

And many more here. Thanks to everyone who suggested books.

Update: Because this came up on Twitter, some biographies specifically about women in science: The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, Hedy's Folly, On a Farther Shore, Marie Curie: A Life, A Feeling for the Organism, Rosalind Franklin: The Dark Lady of DNA, Jane Goodall: The Woman Who Redefined Man, and Radioactive.

Tags: books   lists   science
02 Jul 02:56

Sext

01 Jul 21:06

What we’re watching

01 Jul 18:08

An Abandoned Bangkok Shopping Mall Hides a Fishy Secret

by Christopher Jobson

An Abandoned Bangkok Shopping Mall Hides a Fishy Secret Thailand fish Bangkok
Photo © Jesse Rockwell

An Abandoned Bangkok Shopping Mall Hides a Fishy Secret Thailand fish Bangkok
Photo © Jesse Rockwell

An Abandoned Bangkok Shopping Mall Hides a Fishy Secret Thailand fish Bangkok
Photo © Jesse Rockwell

An Abandoned Bangkok Shopping Mall Hides a Fishy Secret Thailand fish Bangkok
Photo © Jesse Rockwell

An Abandoned Bangkok Shopping Mall Hides a Fishy Secret Thailand fish Bangkok
Photo © Jesse Rockwell

An Abandoned Bangkok Shopping Mall Hides a Fishy Secret Thailand fish Bangkok
Photo © Jesse Rockwell

An Abandoned Bangkok Shopping Mall Hides a Fishy Secret Thailand fish Bangkok
Photo © Jesse Rockwell

In most post-apocalyptic films when the camera pans down the abandoned streets of New York or Tokyo, long after people have disappeared and the buildings have fallen into disrepair, we see nature again thriving. Trees and plants take hold in the sidewalks and wild animals like deer, bears, and lions stalk the ruins left behind by humans. But after descending the staircase at a vacant shopping mall in Bangkok, professional cook and photographer Jesse Rockwell discovered a wholly different take on beasts inheriting the Earth: fish. Specifically exotic koi and catfish, teeming by the thousands in a secret subterranean aquarium. Rockwell shares via his blog:

New World shopping mall, a four storey former shopping mall. Originally constructed as an eleven storey building. It was found to be in breach of old town Bangkok’s four storey limit on building heights. The top seven floors were demolished to adhere to building codes in 1997. In 1999 the mall burned due to suspected arson committed by a competitor in the area. The disaster resulted in several casualties, and the building has remained abandoned ever since. Not having a roof, the basement floor remains under several feet of water year round.

At some point in the early 2000s an unknown person began introducing a small population of exotic Koi and Catfish species. The small population of fish began to thrive and the result is now a self-sustained, and amazingly populated urban aquarium.

What an amazing discovery. It makes you wonder what else lurks in abandoned places around the world? You can see more of Rockwell’s photography over on 500px and on his website, Taste of the Road. (via James Theophane, The Verge)

30 Jun 23:55

Cities at night scarves

30 Jun 21:29

Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2014


Marsel van Oosten (Netherlands)


Tobias Bernhard (Germany)


Justin Black (United States)


Stanley Leroux (France)

Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2014

30 Jun 18:14

Paris and the Unknown, Yoyo the Ricecorpse







Paris and the Unknown, Yoyo the Ricecorpse

30 Jun 17:34

Safely endangered