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30 May 02:08

Artist Henrique Oliveira Constructs a Cavernous Network of Repurposed Wood Tunnels at MAC USP

by Christopher Jobson

Artist Henrique Oliveira Constructs a Cavernous Network of Repurposed Wood Tunnels at MAC USP wood installation architecture

Artist Henrique Oliveira Constructs a Cavernous Network of Repurposed Wood Tunnels at MAC USP wood installation architecture

Artist Henrique Oliveira Constructs a Cavernous Network of Repurposed Wood Tunnels at MAC USP wood installation architecture

Artist Henrique Oliveira Constructs a Cavernous Network of Repurposed Wood Tunnels at MAC USP wood installation architecture

Artist Henrique Oliveira Constructs a Cavernous Network of Repurposed Wood Tunnels at MAC USP wood installation architecture

Artist Henrique Oliveira Constructs a Cavernous Network of Repurposed Wood Tunnels at MAC USP wood installation architecture

Artist Henrique Oliveira Constructs a Cavernous Network of Repurposed Wood Tunnels at MAC USP wood installation architecture

Artist Henrique Oliveira Constructs a Cavernous Network of Repurposed Wood Tunnels at MAC USP wood installation architecture

Artist Henrique Oliveira Constructs a Cavernous Network of Repurposed Wood Tunnels at MAC USP wood installation architecture

Artist Henrique Oliveira Constructs a Cavernous Network of Repurposed Wood Tunnels at MAC USP wood installation architecture

Artist Henrique Oliveira Constructs a Cavernous Network of Repurposed Wood Tunnels at MAC USP wood installation architecture

Brazilian artist Henrique Oliveira (previously) recently completed work on his largest installation to date titled Transarquitetônica at Museu de Arte Contemporânea da Universidade in São Paulo. As with much of his earlier sculptural and installation work the enormous piece is built from tapumes, a kind of temporary siding made from inexpensive wood that is commonly used to obscure construction sites. Oliveira uses the repurposed wood pieces as a skin nailed to an organic framework that looks intentionally like a large root system. Because the space provided by the museum was so immense, the artist expanded the installation into a fully immersive environment where viewers are welcome to enter the artwork and explore the cavernous interior. Transarquitetônica will be on view through the end of November this year, and you can watch the video above by Crane TV to hear Oliveira discuss its creation.

29 May 21:41

The Legend of Diaper Horse by Cassandra Twobears



The Legend of Diaper Horse by Cassandra Twobears

28 May 19:23

Inosemarine

by Chauncey Plantains
28 May 00:34

#35918

26 May 16:30

Harry Whittier Frees Was Photographing Cute Animals In Weird Costumes Long Before We Were

by Sara Barnes

harry_whittier_frees9 harry_whittier_frees6 harry_whittier_frees8 harry_whittier_frees7

Before the insanely popular Lil Bub or the hilarious Doge memes of today was the photography of Harry Whittier Frees, a man who was capturing dogs and cats in odd-yet-amusing situations long before you and I were around. He fashioned a career from these adorable pictures and used them in postcards, calendars, and children’s books. The positive reception (and the fact that it made him wealthy) further proves that our obsession with cuteness is timeless. Some things really do remain the same.

These strange images show cats and dogs in dresses and bonnets, performing household chores like hanging clothes to dry or watering the plants. While it’s hard to deny the cute factor, you can’t help but feel a little uncomfortable by the unnatural positions these actors are posed in. It’s reminiscent to the work of Walter Potter, whom we recently shared here. Although there is a certain similarity to the stiff adorableness, you can feel better knowing that Frees’ animals stayed alive for their photo shoots.

Photographing these tiny creatures was no simple feat and Frees would only photograph three months out of the year. He writes about his experiences in his book Animal Land on the Air:

Rabbits are the easiest to photograph in costume, but incapable of taking many ”human“ parts. Puppies are tractable when rightly understood, but the kitten is the most versatile animal actor, and possesses the greatest variety of appeal. The pig is the most difficult to deal with, but effective on occasion. The best period of young animal models is a short one, being when they are from six to ten weeks of age. An interesting fact is that a kitten’s attention is best held through the sense of sight, while that of a puppy is most influenced by sound, and equally readily distracted by it. The native reasoning powers of young animals moreover, quite as pronounced as those of the human species, and relatively far surer. (Via Co.Design)

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The post Harry Whittier Frees Was Photographing Cute Animals In Weird Costumes Long Before We Were appeared first on Beautiful/Decay Artist & Design.

20 May 17:09

The Metropolitan Museum of Art Releases 400,000 Images Online for Non-Commercial Use

by Christopher Jobson

The Metropolitan Museum of Art Releases 400,000 Images Online for Non Commercial Use photography history black and white
Kinder in einem Feriendorf / Martin Munkacsi / 1929

The Metropolitan Museum of Art has released a vast archive of 400,000 (mostly) hi-resolution digital images online that you can download and use for non-commercial purposes. From a 12-megapixel scan of Rembrandt’s 1660 self-portrait to over 18,000 photos spanning almost two centuries. Here are a few quick gems from the Photography collection, see also: Arms & Armor, Modern and Contemporary Art, and other highlights. (via Kottke)

The Metropolitan Museum of Art Releases 400,000 Images Online for Non Commercial Use photography history black and white
Daughters of Jerusalem / Julia Margaret Camero / 1865

The Metropolitan Museum of Art Releases 400,000 Images Online for Non Commercial Use photography history black and white
Head of Man with Hat and Cigar / Leon Levinstein / 1960

The Metropolitan Museum of Art Releases 400,000 Images Online for Non Commercial Use photography history black and white
Isambard Kingdom Brunel Standing Before the Launching Chains of the Great Eastern / Robert Howlett / 1857

The Metropolitan Museum of Art Releases 400,000 Images Online for Non Commercial Use photography history black and white
A Study, No. 1 / Rudolph Eickemeyer / 1901

The Metropolitan Museum of Art Releases 400,000 Images Online for Non Commercial Use photography history black and white
Street Minstrel, Gose / Shinichi Suzuki / 1870s

The Metropolitan Museum of Art Releases 400,000 Images Online for Non Commercial Use photography history black and white
Group of Thirteen Decapitated Soldiers / Unknown / 1910

The Metropolitan Museum of Art Releases 400,000 Images Online for Non Commercial Use photography history black and white
Sincerely Yours, Woodrow Wilson / Arthur S. Mole / 1918

The Metropolitan Museum of Art Releases 400,000 Images Online for Non Commercial Use photography history black and white
A Girl, Carmel / Johan Hagemeyer / 1930.           Unidentified Child Picking Nose / Walker Evans / 1930.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art Releases 400,000 Images Online for Non Commercial Use photography history black and white

20 May 01:36

#35712

11 May 17:35

Hardy Boys No.199 “The Hardy Boys Lose Their Shit”



Hardy Boys No.199 “The Hardy Boys Lose Their Shit”

12 May 00:59

An app for restaurants to sell discounted leftovers (instead of throwing them away)

by Rachel Oakley

An app for restaurants to sell discounted leftovers (instead of throwing them away)

If you’ve ever worked in the hospitality industry you’ll know just how much food goes to waste at the end of a dinner shift. Kilos upon kilos. So a group of non-wasters got together to create an app – PareUp – that allows users to buy leftover restaurant goodies.

The mobile app ‘will store inventories of participating retailers’ products, allow retailers to update and set prices for the listings, and inform customers of the offerings for the day’. A pretty neat idea, right? Not only will it save you those late night dumpster dives, but it will also save good food from going to landfill.

pareup PareUp PareUp

The post An app for restaurants to sell discounted leftovers (instead of throwing them away) appeared first on Lost At E Minor: For creative people.

10 May 11:53

#35425

09 May 15:55

The Cyanometer Is a 225-Year-Old Tool for Measuring the Blueness of the Sky

by Christopher Jobson

The Cyanometer Is a 225 Year Old Tool for Measuring the Blueness of the Sky tools sky science color
Bibliothèque de Genève, Switzerland

Hot on the heels of a post earlier this week about centuries-old guide for mixing watercolors, I stumbled onto this 18th century instrument designed to measure the blueness of the sky called a Cyanometer. The simple device was invented in 1789 by Swiss physicist Horace-Bénédict de Saussure and German naturalist Alexander von Humboldt who used the circular array of 53 shaded sections in experiments above the skies over Geneva, Chamonix and Mont Blanc. The Cyanometer helped lead to a successful conclusion that the blueness of the sky is a measure of transparency caused by the amount of water vapor in the atmosphere. You can learn more at the Royal Society of Chemistry. (via Free Parking)

08 May 20:42

Kintsugi: The Art of Broken Pieces

by Christopher Jobson

Kintsugi: The Art of Broken Pieces gold ceramics
Wikipedia

Kintsugi: The Art of Broken Pieces gold ceramics
Tokyobike

Kintsugi: The Art of Broken Pieces gold ceramics
Humade

Kintsugi (or kintsukuroi) is a Japanese method for repairing broken ceramics with a special lacquer mixed with gold, silver, or platinum. The philosophy behind the technique is to recognize the history of the object and to visibly incorporate the repair into the new piece instead of disguising it. The process usually results in something more beautiful than the original.

The video above was filmed at Tokyobike in London which recently had a Kintsugi workshop. If you’d like to try the technique yourself, Humade offers gold and silver DIY kintsugi kits. See also: When Mending Becomes an Art. (via Kottke and The Kid Should See This)

09 May 07:06

#35400

08 May 16:30

Video Game Designer Paul Robertson Creates Mesmerizingly Entertaining GIFS

by Victoria Casal-Data

paul_robertson_beautiful_decay_01paul_robertson_beautiful_decay_03

paul_robertson_beautiful_decay_05

Paul Robertson is an Australian animator and digital artist who is known for his pixel art  used in short films and video games. He is mostly known for Scott Pilgrim Vs. the World: The Game and the recent release, Mercenary Kings. Apart from his seasoned career as a game designer and movie creator, Robertson has been recently spotted on Tumblr with these GIFS.

His interest in inserting flashing neon colors, geometric shapes, Japanese character animation, and 1990′s computer imagery, deems his work as heavily influenced by the Seapunk/Vaporwave aesthetic.

  paul_robertson_beautiful_decay_06 the_end_a paul_robertson_beautiful_decay_02paul_robertson_beautiful_decay_07.gif

The post Video Game Designer Paul Robertson Creates Mesmerizingly Entertaining GIFS appeared first on Beautiful/Decay Artist & Design.

06 May 18:56

The Go-Kart

go kart

02 May 19:16

Valley of Dolls: A Bizarre Town in Japan Where an Artist is Replacing Departed Residents with Life-Sized Dolls

by Christopher Jobson
Brianrhart

i calll it NOPEville.

Valley of Dolls: A Bizarre Town in Japan Where an Artist is Replacing Departed Residents with Life Sized Dolls Japan dolls documentary

Valley of Dolls: A Bizarre Town in Japan Where an Artist is Replacing Departed Residents with Life Sized Dolls Japan dolls documentary

Valley of Dolls: A Bizarre Town in Japan Where an Artist is Replacing Departed Residents with Life Sized Dolls Japan dolls documentary

Valley of Dolls: A Bizarre Town in Japan Where an Artist is Replacing Departed Residents with Life Sized Dolls Japan dolls documentary

Valley of Dolls: A Bizarre Town in Japan Where an Artist is Replacing Departed Residents with Life Sized Dolls Japan dolls documentary

Valley of Dolls: A Bizarre Town in Japan Where an Artist is Replacing Departed Residents with Life Sized Dolls Japan dolls documentary

Valley of Dolls: A Bizarre Town in Japan Where an Artist is Replacing Departed Residents with Life Sized Dolls Japan dolls documentary

Valley of Dolls: A Bizarre Town in Japan Where an Artist is Replacing Departed Residents with Life Sized Dolls Japan dolls documentary

Valley of Dolls: A Bizarre Town in Japan Where an Artist is Replacing Departed Residents with Life Sized Dolls Japan dolls documentary
Photo by horiyan

This is one of those things you might never believe if somebody told you, and yet even when faced with the evidence in photos, video, or Google Maps, you find yourself questioning reality (and maybe shaking off a serious case of the heebie jeebies). Welcome to Nagoro, a small village tucked into the valleys of Shikoku, Japan, a place where old residents are being replaced by life-sized dolls.

The work is part of a project by longtime resident and artist Ayano Tsukimi who returned to the village after an 11-year absence to discover many of her old neighbors and friends had left for larger cities or simply passed away. The town itself is dying with a dwindling population of about 35 people.

While gardening one day, Tsukimi constructed a scarecrow in the image of her father and was suddenly struck with the idea to replace other friends and family members with similar dolls. Over 350 dolls and 10 years later, her work continues. She places each doll in a place she feels is important to the memory of that person, so strolling through the down you might discover these inanimate memorials working in fields, fishing in rivers, or passing time in chairs along the road.

Berlin-based filmmaker Fritz Schumann recently visited with the 64-year-old artist and shot the documentary short above. (via Dan Sinker, The Verge)

01 May 21:33

Photos of the new Satanic monument being built for Oklahoma's Statehouse

by Mark Frauenfelder
Brianrhart

lolz

Jonathan Smith of Vice snapped some photos of the Satanic monument being built for the Oklahoma State house. Hurray for the First Amendment! Now I want to erect a giant Dobbshead there.

The statue is a direct response to the state's installation of a Ten Commandments monument outside the Capitol in 2012. State Representative Mike Ritze paid for the controversial statue with his own money, and therefore it was considered a donation and OK to place on government property. Following that line of reasoning, the Satanic Temple submitted a formal application for their monument.

I was offered an early peek at the work in progress by Temple spokesperson Lucien Greaves. Greaves told me he has received numerous threats from people who want to attack the sculpture, but that he “wouldn’t expect these outraged and nearly insensible reactionaries to actually know how to assault a bronze monument without severely hurting themselves in the process.” Still, he’s not taking any chances. The Temple is building a mold of the sculpture so they can pop these things out like evil, terribly expensive action figures whenever they need a new one.

Photos of the new Satanic monument being built for Oklahoma's Statehouse






02 May 04:54

#35162

Brianrhart

oh dear god.

IT'S A VIDEO! HEAD TO THE WEBSITE TO SEE IT!
30 Apr 23:42

#35114

17 Apr 13:51

This Amazing Technicolor Castle has been Abandoned for more than 20 Years

by MessyNessy

castellosam1

Here on this corner of the internet, we see a lot of abandoned places. For some of them, we can even understand how circumstances might have led their abandonment. This however, is a head-in-hands kind of moment.

The Castello di Sammezzano is a show-stopper, a jaw-dropper. Hidden away in the Tuscan hills of Northern Italy, this electrifyingly beautiful Moorish castle was built a whopping 400+ years ago in 1605, but for more than two decades, it’s been sitting empty, neglected, vulnerable to vandalism and to the elements.

listri

(c) Massimo Listri

There are 365 rooms in the Castello di Sammazzano, one for every day of the year. The Moroccan-style palatial villa is a labyrinthe of exquisitely tiled rooms, each one intricately unique. Originally built by a Spanish noble, Ximenes of Aragon in the 17th century, it wasn’t until the 19th century that the castle would find its arabian identity and be transformed into the etherial palace it resembles today.

castellouraven

(c) Dan Raven

castellosam2

castellosam3

(c) Martino Zegwaard

Non plus ultra-3

(c) Darmé

This is all owed to its inheritor, Marquis Ferdinando Panciatichi Ximenes, a largely forgotten but key cultural, social and political figure in Florence when the city was the capital of Italy. Ferdinando, who lived and died at the property, spent 40 years planning, financing and realizing this exotic castle that would become the most important example of orientalist architecture in Italy– only to be left to ruin at the hands of modern-day investors.

Non plus ultra-74

After the Marquis’ death at the end of the 19th century, there was a period of uncertainty for the property and historical records appear to be rather patchy. During the war, the Germans came looting, stealing mainly from the castle’s surrounding park that had once been considered the largest and most exotic in Tuscany. They took many important statues and fountains of Moorish style, as well as an entire bridge and a grotto featuring a statue of Venus. When the war ended, the castle became a luxury hotel, restaurant and bar.

castellosam4

Unfortunately there appears to be no photographs of the villa during this period, I couldn’t even get the name of the hotel, which reportedly closed its doors in 1990. For a decade, it stood without a master of the house until 1999, when a British company ceremoniously bought the Castello di Sammezzano at auction. But still, the castello would remain unoccupied; it’s vaulted rooms and archways empty and unappreciated.

Non plus ultra-75

The plan for Sammezzano called for an 18-hole championship golf course and a large sports facility and clubhouse. But construction hadn’t yet begun when the investment company ran into “economic issues” and the castle was forgotten, left to fall into an extreme state of disrepair. The exterior damage by vandals and the weather is fairly evident. On the inside, many windows were broken, railings cut, chandeliers and rosettes stolen.

Non plus ultra-55

It wasn’t until 2013 that a local non-profit committee was founded to help raise awareness of the increasingly decaying castle. They have no ownership of Sammezzano but they help to arrange and promote public openings. And while the Comitato FPXA (after the initials of Ferdinando Panciatichi Ximenes of Aragon) has been doing their part, the property has been quietly sold to the global developer, Palmerston Hotel & Resorts.

Non plus ultra-57

On their website, the developer’s to-do list includes several worldwide projects, including the Castello Sammezzano, which they intend to develop into a “luxurious sporting resort, incorporating a boutique hotel, apartments, spa and country club with golf, tennis and various sporting amenities”. They have obtained all necessary planning approvals and claim redevelopment is scheduled to commence in 2014.

Non plus ultra-58

Another luxury hotel development might not be the fairytale ending we were necessarily waiting for, but here’s hoping this arabian castle will finally be restored to its former glory– and maybe they’ll let us come round for a mint tea under those otherworldly ceilings.

Non plus ultra-67

Stay tuned for updates on the Comitato FPXA facebook page

Images by urban exploration photographers Dan Raven / Darmé / Martino Zegwaard

17 Apr 00:33

A tumblog of Greatness: Time is a Flat Circus

by Xeni Jardin
04 Apr 14:05

360° Panoramic Video Creates the Illusion of a Man Riding a Bike around a Tiny World

by Christopher Jobson
Brianrhart

reminds me of Katamari.

360° Panoramic Video Creates the Illusion of a Man Riding a Bike around a Tiny World video art

360° Panoramic Video Creates the Illusion of a Man Riding a Bike around a Tiny World video art

German photographer and journalist Jonas Ginter created a sweet panoramic camera rig using 6 GoPro cameras that he mounted above his bicycle and car. The resulting video makes it appear as though he’s pedaling around a tiny world. (via Stellar)

02 Apr 15:53

The most profane and most homophobic rap albums of all time revealed

by Chris Kelly

2Pac’s All Eyez on Me takes the top spot with 905 swears.

The number crunchers over at Best Tickets have used their analytic toolkit for a study that would make the Parents Music Resource Center blush: a comprehensive look of the most profane artists and albums in popular rap music.

Using the five rap albums deemed more influential or important (based on sales figures, name recognition, “hit density” and more) from the years 1985 to 2013, the study found an average of 217.7 “cuss words” per album.

While 2Pac notched the top two spots on the rap album list (for All Eyez on Me and Until the End of Time), Too $hort’s Raw, Uncut & X-Rated lives up to its title with the most profanity per song. Southern rap heavyweights Geto Boys, Scarface and Juvenille were named most profane artists.

The study also graphed profanity, use of “the N-word,” homophobia and misogyny over the same period. Unsurprisingly, Eminem’s Marshall Mathers LP not only made 2000 the most lyrically homophobic year, but it was “BY FAR the most homophobic album” in the study. Similarly, Raw, Uncut & X-Rated was the study’s most misogynistic album, with 26.4 misogynistic profanities per song.

Check out the full study (with charts and downloadable data) over at Best Tickets.

02 Apr 14:12

Sesame Street Fighter is now a video game

by Inigo del Castillo
Brianrhart

you have to click the article then click the link to play

Sesame Street Fighter is now a video game

If you ever wanted to get your hands on Sesame Street’s Bert or Elmo or Cookie Monster and beat them to a pulp – for whatever sick reason you might have – now’s your chance! ‘Sesame Street Fighter’ is now a free playable online game thanks to game developer Cocoalasca. This genius concept started with DeviantArt user gavacho13 when he illustrated ‘Sesame Street’ characters in the style of ‘Street Fighter’. The internet loved it, and now we can get back at Oscar for all his grouchiness through the years, by typing in the random words that appear on the screen.

It’s a fun and addicting game where you’ll see Bert as Ryu, Cookie Monster as E. Honda, and Elmo as M.Bison, to name a few. The game only has six characters as of now, but we’re hoping they expand it soon, because I would love to Hadouken Big Bird to bits.

You can play the game here.

The post Sesame Street Fighter is now a video game appeared first on Lost At E Minor: For creative people.

01 Apr 15:37

Husky Grooming Cat Gets Interrupted by Pervy Pomeranian

by tastefullyoffensive.com
31 Mar 18:35

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/WtfJapanSeriously/~3/N2h_o_YKwuQ/blog-post_31.html

by Chauncey Plantains

28 Mar 05:23

Teaser Trailer

Brianrhart

lol. will get wasted and watch.

Coming to Cinemas this Summer...(Read...)

25 Mar 16:23

Gallery of space colony art from the 1970s

by Mark Frauenfelder

Here's a terrific gallery of images from NASA's archives imagining life in space colonies. They were made in the 1970s so everything and everyone looks like they are from the 1970s.

Space Colony Art from the 1970s

    






25 Mar 16:00

Yang Maoyuan’s Mirrored Alterations Of Classical Sculpture

by Nathaniel Smith

Yang Maoyuan Yang Maoyuan Yang MaoyuanYang Maoyuan

Yang Maoyuan is a Beijing, China-based multidisciplinary artist noted for his shaping and misshaping of the human form. Born in Dalian, China in 1966, the artist has been witness to one of the most massive cultural shifts ever to occur in human history, so it is not surprising that historical relics and remnants, loaded with archaeological connotations, become source material for Yang.

In a series of work created in 2009, replicas of classical sculptural busts are created in bronze, and systematically sanded, smoothed and rounded out, giving the once easily recognizable faces a new and updated quality. The mirrored effect of these bronzes contemporarizes the pieces, but also forces viewers to see their own reflection in history. Some of the series became Look Inside, while other replicas took their titles from their original source inspirations. 

When photographed in their installation environments, the resulting images look similar to 2-Dimensional collages, with smooth cut lines and rounded edges. It is this new verbal language that not only consumes classical sculptural, but also affects the way contemporary audiences will continue to consume culture.  (via notshakingthegrass)

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20130829104318_DSC4116 201308291055381青铜雕像20100912122109伏尔泰a bYang-Maoyuans-at-Jing-Yuan-Gallery

The post Yang Maoyuan’s Mirrored Alterations Of Classical Sculpture appeared first on Beautiful/Decay Artist & Design.

10 Mar 17:30

Prisoner Creates Epic Mural Out Of Bedsheets, Hair Gel, And Newspapers As a Meditation On Heaven, Hell, And Redemption

by Victoria Casal-Data
01_apokaluptein16389067

Artist Jesse Krimes stands in front of his 39-panel mural Apokaluptein:16389067 (federal prison bed sheets, transferred New York Times images, color pencil) installed, here, at the Olivet Church Artist Studios, Philadelphia. January, 2014.

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In 2009, Jesse Krimes (yes that is his real name) was sentenced to 70 months in a federal penitentiary for cocaine possession and intent to distribute. The judge sentenced Jesse to a minimum security prison in New Jersey, close to support network of friends and family, but the Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP) opted to send him to a medium security facility in Butner, North Carolina.

His way of coping with the life-changing sentence went a bit more differently than you would expect. He got by with a little help from federal prison bed sheets, hair gel, The New York Times, and some color pencils. Although money was limited in prison, he never struggled to gather enough money to purchase these objects. You might be thinking these are random, but, in fact, they are what made prison life a somewhat more passable experience.

While experimenting with these four materials, Krimes discovered that he could transfer the newspaper images onto the prison bedsheets. At first he used water to do this, but that did not work. Hair gel, on the other hand, had the requisite viscosity to do the job. He was not aware that three years after, he would end up with a 39-panel mural. Each transfer took 30-minutes. Thousands make up the mural. Krimes only worked on one bed-sheet at a time, each of them matching the size of the tabletop he worked on. The laborious routine kept Krimes sane, focused and disciplined.

“Doing this was a way to fight back, the system is designed to make you into a criminal and make you conform. I beat the system.”

Apokaluptein:16389067, the title of the piece, derived from the Greek root ‘apokalupsis’ which means to uncover, or reveal; 16389067 was Krimes’ Federal Bureau of Prisons identification number.

“The origin [of the word] speaks to the material choice of the prison sheet as the skin of the prison, that is literally used to cover and hide the body of the prisoner. Apokaluptein:16389067 reverses the sheet’s use and opens up the ability to have a conversation about the sheet as a material which, here, serves to uncover and reveal the prison system.”

The content of the mural varies but, for the most part, it is a meditation on heaven, hell, sin, redemption, celebrity worship, deprivation and the nature of perceived reality. According to Krimes, his entire experience of prison is tied up in the artwork.

“The work is a depiction of represented reality as it exists in its mediated form, within the fabric of the prison. It was my attempt to transfer [outside] reality into prison and then later became my escape when I sent a piece home with the hopes that it could be my voice on the outside in the event that anything bad ever happened and I never made it home.”

During the three years it took to complete the piece, Krimes was able to put his artistic talent to the service of others, as he established art classes for fellow prisoners in an institution that was devoid of meaningful programs. The men, compelled by Krimes’ work, helped him complete some parts of the project. (via Prison Photography)

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The post Prisoner Creates Epic Mural Out Of Bedsheets, Hair Gel, And Newspapers As a Meditation On Heaven, Hell, And Redemption appeared first on Beautiful/Decay Artist & Design.