Shared posts

18 Jul 13:00

Inglorious Fruits and Vegetables

by Miss Cellania

(YouTube link)

While the price of fresh fruits and vegetables goes up, vendors regularly toss out tons of produce because it’s not pretty. Perfectly good food in irregular shapes, sizes, and colors is too often just wasted. French grocery chain Intermarché began a program of buying those “unacceptable” fruits and vegetables and selling them to the public -for 30% off regular prices! They call these products “Inglorious Fruits and Vegetables.” Shoppers get a bargain, and much less of the crops go to waste.

I would love to buy ugly but fresh fruit at a 30% discount, instead of the way I do it now: saving 30% because the pretty fruit is old and overripe. -via Viral Viral Videos

19 Jul 14:00

Saturday Stat: Wait, WHO Dislikes Atheists?

by Lisa Wade, PhD

Last month I posted data showing that, of all the things that might disqualify someone for public office, being an atheist is tops.  I wrote: “Prejudice against those who say there’s no god is stronger than ageism, homophobia, and sexism.” On average, Americans would rather vote for someone who admitted to smoking pot or had an extramarital affair.

We just don’t like atheists.

But who is “we”?

A survey by the Pew Research Center asked Americans of varying religious affiliations how they felt about each other.  atheists were most disliked by Protestants, especially White evangelicals and Black Protestants (somewhat less so White Mainline Protestants).  Atheists quite liked themselves, and agnostics thought were they were okay. Among other religiously affiliated groups, Jews gave atheists the highest rating.

1

For what it’s worth, atheists feel warmish toward Jews in return, preferring them to everyone except Buddhists, and they dislike Evangelical Christians almost as much as the Christians dislike them.

Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the co-author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

(View original at http://thesocietypages.org/socimages)

21 Jul 02:37

fantasticcatadventures: file that under adorable



fantasticcatadventures:

file that under adorable

18 Jul 06:20

aconnormanning: prokopetz: anarchydiver: The reason why the...



aconnormanning:

prokopetz:

anarchydiver:

The reason why the room was pink was because on black and white film, hues of red become dark shades of black. Pink is the perfect balance to give it that dark creepy grey.

PHOTOGRAPHY BITCHES

A related fun fact: while old black and white film was under-sensitive to reds, it was correspondingly over-sensitive to greens. Actors whose characters were meant to have unnaturally pale complexions - like Morticia Addams - would often take advantage of this by wearing makeup with a green base tint in order to make their faces “pop”. This is where the modern trope of cartoon vampires having green skin comes from.

These are some fun fucking facts

11 Jul 18:29

Photo









20 Jul 03:16

cateringisalie: shvnyyy-e: zwamboobs: blazepress: Filming a...



cateringisalie:

shvnyyy-e:

zwamboobs:

blazepress:

Filming a rainbow when suddenly.

Sick

what the fuck

#the rainbow got pissed

19 Jul 17:47

Photo









20 Jul 13:18

Tumblr | 7e6.png

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10 Jul 07:01

Venus de Milo

by Doug
09 Jul 07:01

The Sculptor

by Doug
20 Jul 13:06

A Solar Filament Erupts

A Solar Filament Erupts
19 Jul 17:47

Photo



19 Jul 23:50

hedgehog-goulash7: preludes-and-prufrock: awwdish: thestraggle...

by aishiterushit




















hedgehog-goulash7:

preludes-and-prufrock:

awwdish:

thestraggletag:

thestraggletag:

submariet:

VAN EYCK

I lost it at the end.

Okay, I had to check out the Van Eyck thing. I was a bit in denial because, come on, every single person can’t look like President Putin!

There are no words to describe how wrong I was.

Reblogging this for my art history class this semester

buwhahaha

The art historian in me had to reblog this.

18 Jul 05:30

"An abusive man may embellish his childhood suffering once he discovers that it helps him escape..."

“An abusive man may embellish his childhood suffering once he discovers that it helps him escape responsibility. The National District Attorney’s Association Bulletin reported a revealing study that was conducted on another group of destructive men: child sexual abusers. The researcher asked each man whether he himself had been sexually victimized as a child. A hefty 67 percent of the subjects said yes. However, the researcher then informed the men that he was going to hook them up to a lie-detector test and ask them the same questions again. Affirmative answers suddenly dropped to only 29 percent. In other words, abusers of all varieties tend to realize the mileage they can get out of saying, ‘I’m abusive because the same thing was done to me.’”

- Lundy Bancroft, Why Does He Do That?: Inside the Minds of Angry and Controlling Men (via monobey)
18 Jul 05:33

phantom-locked: hex-girlfriend: festeringfae: Kristen is...









phantom-locked:

hex-girlfriend:

festeringfae:

Kristen is tired of shitty girl power movies

#people say she doesn’t show emotions#but who cares about emotions#she shows herself#shouldn’t that be good enough for anyone?

There’s a lot of stigma around anyone who’s been in the Twilight movies, because it was a shitty series that bred a lot of shitty things. But I’ve seen lots of Kristen Stewart posts of herself being awesome and a good person.

18 Jul 05:36

artivismproject: Just an FYI.



artivismproject:

Just an FYI.

18 Jul 05:37

To catch them all is my real test, to train them is my cause!

I WILL TRAVEL ACROSS THE LAND

SEARCHING FAR AND WIDEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE

yourfriendlyneighbourhoodladyl

image

20 Jul 02:55

musingsofanawkwardblackgirl: sizvideos: Watch it in...













musingsofanawkwardblackgirl:

sizvideos:

Watch it in video

Follow our Tumblr

Now if you added in the non-white element…

18 Jul 23:03

richbram: Lawrence Halprin, fuente Ira Keller, Portland













richbram:

Lawrence Halprin, fuente Ira Keller, Portland

12 Jul 20:26

Two Neighbors From Austin, Tx

19 Jul 05:34

Fist kiss is always awkward… #9gag



Fist kiss is always awkward… #9gag

18 Jul 21:53

Sinopese: o Doctor Who e uma companion resolver visitar a derrota do Brasil no Maracanã em 1950 e...

Sinopese: o Doctor Who e uma companion resolver visitar a derrota do Brasil no Maracanã em 1950 e acidentalmente chegam ao mineirão em 2014, onde descobrem que todos os bonecos do Fuleco são demônios.

18 Jul 21:52

Tumblr | 352.png

352.png
14 Jul 16:46

People who go “both countries are at fault”

pax-arabica:

What they think they sound like:

“I’m so rational. The truth is somewhere in the middle, they’re both wrong. I’m so nuanced and enlightened with my views.”

What they actually sound like:

“History and context are things that do not exist to me. In whatever dimension I exist in, I believe that there is an equivalence between an advanced occupying army that is notorious for war crimes, and an occupied brutalized population.”

18 Jul 04:47

japan



japan

17 Jul 02:57

durpacerangerrogjro: IT’S BEEN OVER A YEAR SINCE I SAW THIS...



durpacerangerrogjro:

IT’S BEEN OVER A YEAR SINCE I SAW THIS POST I’M SO HAPPY

14 Jul 20:30

[poorlydrawnlines]

18 Jul 03:17

joaquin phoenix’s forehead



joaquin phoenix’s forehead

13 Jul 17:55

Lessons From Brazil's War on Poverty

Brazil is a giant when it comes to soccer. In the late 1990s, it was a giant in another area, this one much less desirable: Brazil had one of the highest levels of income inequality in the world, as home to some of the world’s poorest people, while its richest competed with the wealthiest in the United States and elsewhere.1

In 2001, Brazil’s Gini coefficient — the most common (but not necessarily most attractive) measure of inequality2 — hovered around 0.60, a very high figure by any standard. (A Gini coefficient of 0 represents perfect equality where everyone earns the same income, and 1 represents complete inequality where all the country’s income accrues to a single person.) By comparison, the U.S. — not exactly a bastion of equality — had a Gini coefficient of 0.4 in 2000.3

ozler-feature-brazilincome

But from 2001 to 2007, income inequality in Brazil started to decline at an unprecedented rate: The Gini coefficient fell from above 0.60 to below 0.55, reaching its lowest level in more than 30 years. The incomes of the poorest tenth of Brazilians grew by 7 percent per year, nearly three times the national average of 2.5 percent. In less than a decade, Brazil had managed to cut the proportion of its population living in extreme poverty in half.4

This sharp decline coincided with the introduction of Brazil’s first cash transfer programs in 2001. Created to reduce poverty in the short-run, these programs also provided incentives to households to invest in their children’s education, health and nutrition. Brazil was following on the success of Mexico, which a couple of years earlier had introduced PROGRESA, perhaps the world’s best-known and most influential conditional cash transfer program.5 Brazil consolidated its programs into one program, called Bolsa Familia, in 2003.

Bolsa Familia targeted households whose per capita monthly income was less than 120 reais (a yearly income of $828). The government paid these households between 20 to 182 reais per month (between $132 to $1,248 a year) if they met certain conditions: Children under the age of 17 had to regularly attend school; pregnant women had to visit clinics for prenatal and antenatal care; and parents needed to make sure their children were fully immunized by age 5 and received growth check-ups until age 6. It also provided a small allocation to extremely poor households with no strings attached. By 2010, Bolsa Familia had grown to one of the world’s largest conditional cash transfer programs, providing 40 billion reais (about $24 billion) to nearly 50 million people, about a quarter of Brazil’s population.

So what role did Bolsa Familia play in the decline of inequality in Brazil since 2000? With such a large transfer of money from taxpayers to Brazil’s poorest, you’d imagine there must have been some impact, but how much of one? Identifying the causal effects of large, nationwide government programs is challenging. Many factors can affect the distribution of income over time. Shifting demographics, the changing nature of work, and women’s participation in the labor force can all affect income inequality. If you wanted to truly isolate Bolsa Familia’s effect, you could theoretically conduct an experiment — not unlike the trials that pharmaceutical companies routinely do to test a drug’s effectiveness — where you’d randomly assign some communities and not others to the cash transfer program, and then compare inequality between them.

However, this type of social experiment is hard, if not impossible, for governments to conduct for a long period of time. For example, Mexico did randomly assign some eligible communities to PROGRESA while withholding the benefits from other (equally eligible) communities at the start, but this pilot phase lasted only 18 months, after which the program was rolled out to all eligible areas. An 18-month period might have been sufficient to evaluate the effects of the program on children’s school attendance and women’s visits to health clinics, but it was too short a period to evaluate the program’s longer-term impacts on poverty and inequality. In any case, researcher Gala Diaz Langou says that leaving some areas out of the program was not politically feasible in Brazil, so there was no such experimentation with Bolsa Familia.6

So if you can’t do a randomized trial, what can you do to assess the program’s effect on Brazil’s drop in income inequality? Economists often try to understand changes in income inequality by quantifying all the elements that affect the distribution of income, such as the proportion of adults who work, the number of hours they work, their hourly wages, whether they have income from other assets, and whether they’re receiving money from the government. Once income is broken down by source at a given point in time, researchers can try to isolate the role of each source in changes in the distribution of income by keeping that factor constant over time and allowing all the remaining factors to vary. While this approach doesn’t identify the causal effect of any one factor on changes in a country’s Gini coefficient, it’s still a useful accounting exercise — helpful in focusing on the main factors associated with the changes in the distribution of incomes.7

Using this approach, two studies — a 2010 paper on Brazil (by Ricardo Barros and co-authors from Brazil’s Institute of Applied Economic Research) and a 2013 paper on a number of countries in Latin America including Brazil (by the World Bank’s Joao Pedro Azevedo and co-authors) — have separately found that government transfers accounted for about 40 percent of the decline in inequality in Brazil, with expansions in pensions and Bolsa Familia (and a related program for people with disabilities) contributing roughly equally to the decline in income inequality. However, of these government transfers, Bolsa Familia was by far the most important component in raising the income levels of Brazil’s poorest households: Between 2001 and 2007, the share of people receiving these conditional cash transfer payments increased by more than 10 percentage points, from 6.5 percent to 16.9 percent. This accounted for the entire increase in the share of households that received non-labor income (i.e. income from sources outside of working a job).

Hence, available estimates suggest that Bolsa Familia contributed about 15 to 20 percent of the decline in income inequality during the decade starting in 2000. These effects were most likely achieved by putting money directly into the pockets of poor households.8 Because the money is tied to parents’ investing more in their children’s health and education, advocates of the program hope these cash transfers will not only reduce poverty in real time, but keep the next generation from poverty as well. And it appears Bolsa Familia may also have had some success in this respect: Paul Glewwe of the University of Minnesota and Ana Lucia Kassouf of the University of Sao Paulo found in 2012 that the program has led to improvements in children’s school enrollment and advancement, which could translate into higher incomes for them as adults and further reductions in poverty and inequality.

But if Bolsa Familia only accounted for 15 to 20 percent of the drop in income inequality in Brazil, what contributed the most? The same two studies agree that rising wages among the poor were the main driver of the decline in inequality in Brazil. While their methodologies differ slightly, the studies show that changes in labor income accounted for 55 to 60 percent of the drop in income inequality.

And why did wages for the poor rise? Even before Bolsa Familia, the Brazilian government adopted policies that expanded access to education: Between 1995 and 2005, the average schooling among workers increased by almost two years. At the same time, the hourly wages for a worker with a given level of education rose much faster among the poor than the rest of the population, likely due to the increased demand for low-skilled labor that accompanied the commodity and price booms experienced in Brazil, and Latin America more generally, according to research by Leonardo Gasparini of the National University of La Plata in Argentina and co-authors. So, a combination of public policy (expansion of access to education and government transfers to the poor) and favorable market factors (rising wages for low-skilled workers) led to substantial declines in inequality in Brazil.

Income inequality in Brazil and Latin America remains high. Barros and his co-authors estimate that almost two more decades of similar progress is needed to bring income inequality in Brazil down to the world average.9 Expanding cash transfer programs like Bolsa Familia might be tough for the government, particularly in periods of tighter budgets. However, experimentation with these programs’ design (in Brazil and elsewhere) — for example, expanding Bolsa Familia benefits instead of pursuing continued increases in pensions for older Brazilians10 — can allow governments to maximize impacts while keeping a lid on program budgets.

07 Jul 02:19

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