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19 Aug 19:18

Manul – the Cat that Time Forgot

by RJ Evans
Have you ever wanted to take a trip through time to see what animals looked like millions of years ago? When it comes to cats there is little or no need.  This beautiful specimen is a Manul, otherwise known as Pallas’s Cat.  About twelve million years ago it was one of the first two modern cats to evolve and it hasn’t changed since. The other species, Martelli’s Cat, is extinct so what you are looking at here is a unique window in to the past of modern cats.

Although the Manul is only the size of the domestic cat, reaching about 26 inches in length its appearance makes it appear somewhat larger.  It is stocky and has very lengthy, thick fur, which gives it, perhaps to human eyes, an unintentional appearance of feline rotundity.  Yet although it appears stout and somewhat ungainly it has a natural elegance and poise – exactly what you would expect from the genus Felis in other words.  Plus it can certainly look after itself in a fight!

The main reason for its survival throughout the ages has been its isolation. In the wild it lives on the Asian steppes at substantial heights – up to 13,000 feet.  Based in India, Pakistan, western China and Mongolia as well as Afghanistan and Turkemistan, it has even been discovered recently in the wilds of the Sayan region of Siberia. In these places it prefers rocky areas, semidesert and barren hillsides.  In other words places where we are less likely to live – but even having said that you will no doubt be able to hazard a guess which species is the Manul’s greatest enemy.

Take a close look at the eyes of the Manul.  Do you see a difference between it and the domestic cat? That’s right, the pupils of the Manul are round, not slit-like.  Proportionally too, the legs are smaller than cats we know and they can’t run anywhere near as quickly.  As for the ears, well, when you actually can catch sight of them they are very low and much further apart than you would see in a domestic cat.

It also has a much shorter face than other cats, which makes its face look flattened.  Some people, when they see their first Manus mistakenly believe that it is a monkey because of its facial appearance and bulky looking frame.  It is easier to see why, from some angles.

The Manus has not been studied a great deal in the wild, where it is classified as near threatened.  This is because it is distributed very patchily throughout its territory, not to mention the fact it is still hunted despite protection orders made by the various governments who create human law in its range. Before it was legally protected tens of thousands of Manuls were hunted and killed each year, mostly for their fur.

It is thought that the cat hunts mostly at dawn and dusk where it will feed on small rodents and birds. Ambush and stalking are their favorite methods of conducting a hunt and although they tend to shelter in abandoned burrows in the day they have been seen basking in the sun. In other words, behaviorally they are much like the domesticated moggy that we know and love.

The Manul is a solitary creature and individuals do not tend to meet purposefully when it is outside the breeding season and will avoid the company of others of its kind where possible. When it is threatened it raises and quivers the upper lip, Elvis like, revealing a large canine tooth.

When breeding does happen the male has to get in quickly as oestrus usually only lasts just under two days. It usually births up to six kittens, very rarely a single one, and it is believed that the size of its litters reflect the high rate of mortality the infant cats can expect. Yet they are expected to be able to hunt at sixteen weeks and are very much on their own and independent by six months. Although their life expectancy in the wild is unknown in captivity they have lived to over eleven years.

Don’t rush to your local pet store, however.  The Manul does not domesticate and even if it did they are incredibly hard to breed in captivity with many kittens dying.  This is thought to be because in the wild, due to its isolation, the cat’s immune system did not have a need to develop and so when they come in contact with us and other species, this under-developed immune system lets them down.

Yet as a living, breathing glimpse in to twelve million years of feline history these amazing animals are irreplaceable. Unique is a word which, in this day and age, is mightily overused. Yet these cats are quite simply just that – unique.

15 Aug 16:00

Sit On the Edge of Your Seat with the 60 Red Chair

by Nanette Wong

Sit On the Edge of Your Seat with the 60 Red Chair

The 60 Red Chair is giving the phrase “sitting on the edge of your seat” a whole new meaning. Designed by XYZ Integrated Architecture, the sleek red chair is at a perpetual slant, creating a sense of tension for the user. Each chair is handmade from steel, and each one is unique.

Sit On the Edge of Your Seat with the 60 Red Chair in main home furnishings Category

Sit On the Edge of Your Seat with the 60 Red Chair in main home furnishings Category

Sit On the Edge of Your Seat with the 60 Red Chair in main home furnishings Category

Sit On the Edge of Your Seat with the 60 Red Chair in main home furnishings Category

Sit On the Edge of Your Seat with the 60 Red Chair in main home furnishings Category

Sit On the Edge of Your Seat with the 60 Red Chair in main home furnishings Category

Photos by Nakani Mamasaxlisi.








15 Aug 17:00

A 1950′s Post & Beam Home Gets a Modern Addition

by Caroline Williamson

A 1950′s Post & Beam Home Gets a Modern Addition

The Sycamore House is a project from Aaron Neubert Architects that restores a 1950′s post & beam house in Los Angeles while also incorporating a 1,500-square-foot addition. Careful attention was paid to the design of the new addition as the lot’s peninsular shape and sloping terrain played a huge factor into how it could be laid out. Sycamore trees on the property meant a lot to the homeowner so keeping them around was mandatory, making things difficult as one was planted in the primary location for the addition.

A 1950s Post & Beam Home Gets a Modern Addition in main interior design architecture Category

A 1950s Post & Beam Home Gets a Modern Addition in main interior design architecture Category

The addition was positioned perpendicularly between the exiting residence and the street setback. The interior living spaces are still kept relatively private, while the home opens up towards the hillside view.

A 1950s Post & Beam Home Gets a Modern Addition in main interior design architecture Category

They used multiple cantilevers within the addition that extend out over the hillside giving them the square footage they desired.

A 1950s Post & Beam Home Gets a Modern Addition in main interior design architecture Category

One of the beloved sycamore trees is actually incorporated into the house, piercing through the kitchen, family room, master suite, and the roof deck.

A 1950s Post & Beam Home Gets a Modern Addition in main interior design architecture Category

Helping blend the old with the new, the existing wood beams and the new steel structure are all painted red and all of the fixed windows are black.

A 1950s Post & Beam Home Gets a Modern Addition in main interior design architecture Category

Completely in love with the jagged black and white lines that start in the kitchen and move through the living room.

A 1950s Post & Beam Home Gets a Modern Addition in main interior design architecture Category

A 1950s Post & Beam Home Gets a Modern Addition in main interior design architecture Category

A 1950s Post & Beam Home Gets a Modern Addition in main interior design architecture Category

A 1950s Post & Beam Home Gets a Modern Addition in main interior design architecture Category

The large windows help bring the outdoors in and make you feel like you’re perched within the trees.

A 1950s Post & Beam Home Gets a Modern Addition in main interior design architecture Category

A 1950s Post & Beam Home Gets a Modern Addition in main interior design architecture Category

A 1950s Post & Beam Home Gets a Modern Addition in main interior design architecture Category

A 1950s Post & Beam Home Gets a Modern Addition in main interior design architecture Category

A 1950s Post & Beam Home Gets a Modern Addition in main interior design architecture Category

A 1950s Post & Beam Home Gets a Modern Addition in main interior design architecture Category

A 1950s Post & Beam Home Gets a Modern Addition in main interior design architecture Category

A 1950s Post & Beam Home Gets a Modern Addition in main interior design architecture Category

Photos by Brian Thomas Jones.








13 Aug 00:00

SDM Apartment / Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop

by AD Editorial Team
Julianamarques

essa escada

Architects: Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop
Location: Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
Project Area: 528.0 m2
Photography: Courtesy of Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop

From the architect. Located in central Mumbai, our client builds a 6 story building, 2 for each apartment, we simultaneously perform 3 interior design projects for 3 different clients, all from the same family; parents, (an older couple) and 2 families of young couples with children, each with different needs and personalities, this is how we address the same space with different distributions, each had a different reason on which interiors are designed, a concept far from typical housing in India, a space for living inside, contrasting with its urban context, with its social environment.

Specifically in the SDM apartment, after a talk with each member of the family, we got a well defined program based on the customs of each user and each space, the staircase located at the center of the apartment. It was designed as a sculpture in the space with more light and natural ventilation; with very subtle lines but protagonist of the space, it can be seen almost from anywhere in the public areas, it becomes the articulator of spaces and is replicated in other architectural elements such as blinds and ceiling; every space, every detail meets a special character of the users, every color, every picture, every kitchen utensil, every linen was specifically chosen to complete this project and to make it unique.

The pooja room or prayer room was the subject of a major investigation that is expressed in each element, color and lighting, the carving work for the board is a real craft, integrating these elements in a contemporary way was our way to achieve a space for contemplation, spiritual communion, peace and harmony.

Each bedroom has a different atmosphere and they have been specially furnished with pieces selected from the furniture fair in Milan, we can see a wide variety of exclusive designs, artwork, rugs and tapestries, mosaics applications, arabescato marble and walnut wood contrasting with the white of the general area.

The bedroom is a place where the ceiling is an important element and which subtly illuminates the area, the movement generated in it responds to the frame beams that form the structure, ie, we have taken advantage of the space between beams to gain the maximum possible height.

The kitchen as element for family reunion has been designed on simple lines which together with the materials create a serene and elegant atmosphere.

Departamento SDM  / Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop Courtesy of Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop Departamento SDM  / Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop Courtesy of Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop Departamento SDM  / Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop Courtesy of Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop Departamento SDM  / Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop Courtesy of Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop Departamento SDM  / Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop Courtesy of Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop Departamento SDM  / Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop Courtesy of Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop Departamento SDM  / Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop Courtesy of Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop Departamento SDM  / Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop Courtesy of Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop Departamento SDM  / Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop Courtesy of Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop Departamento SDM  / Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop Courtesy of Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop Departamento SDM  / Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop Courtesy of Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop Departamento SDM  / Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop Courtesy of Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop Departamento SDM  / Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop Courtesy of Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop Departamento SDM  / Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop Courtesy of Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop Departamento SDM  / Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop Courtesy of Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop Departamento SDM  / Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop Courtesy of Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop Departamento SDM  / Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop Courtesy of Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop Departamento SDM  / Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop Courtesy of Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop Departamento SDM  / Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop Courtesy of Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop Departamento SDM  / Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop Courtesy of Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop Departamento SDM  / Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop Courtesy of Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop Departamento SDM  / Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop Courtesy of Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop Departamento SDM  / Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop Courtesy of Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop Departamento SDM  / Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop Floor Plan 1 Departamento SDM  / Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop Floor Plan 2 Departamento SDM  / Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop Model 1 Departamento SDM  / Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop Model 2 Departamento SDM  / Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop Model 3 Departamento SDM  / Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop Model 4 Departamento SDM  / Arquitectura en Movimiento Workshop Model 5
11 Aug 21:00

LUZ shirokane / Kawabe Naoya Architects Design Office

by Fabian Cifuentes

Architects: Kawabe Naoya Architects Design Office
Location: Shirokane, Minato, Tokyo, Japan
Area: 500.0 sqm
Year: 2011
Photographs: Akinobu Kawabe

From the architect. Place in common space It is a housing complex in five story and 13 households that builts like overcrowding the small factory and the house in surroundings. In the situation in which the site was almost enclosed in the building, it was thought that it had not only relies on the surrounding for the dwelling environment but also it made it . A common space plays the role here. The lighting, ventilation ,and view, and the element requested outside is usually taken in construction, and shared with each unit.

A common part is related around according to the number of stories and the direction the accumulated unit that continues from ground to the roof through the stairs and the open ceiling, and choosing the omission on the roof of the road and the near unoccupied land and the neighboring house. The wind comes off through an upper and lower floor, and the light of the sun enters from various directions through a day . Externals are composed of an window that doesn’t distinguish an unit and a common space . A common space in each floor is a place like the interior attached to each unit by a little expanding or more width than a usual passage ,and as a similar scale to the unit.

As for a common space, it thought even about the detail as the same interior as the unit so that the other side of the room window might make depth with a continuous feeling as another whereabouts . The aluminium sash of ready-made goods turns a wooden frame to all sides in flat as the wall for how from the reason for the weather flashing like the outside to see it, and erases the detail as the aluminium sash. Moreover, because a usual intercom gives the impression of the place like the hall, the plate of the same specification as the indoor switch is used .

The table, the bench, and the shelf designed for exclusive use according to the characteristic and the usage of the place are put on the interior. Time is piled by the book and planting’s being put by the living person, and being used in daily life. It wishes a common space not only the tenant but also to tie to the person to person, and the environment to person exceeding the role even if the ambient surrounding changes by rebuilding.

LUZ shirokane / Kawabe Naoya Architects Design Office © Akinobu Kawabe LUZ shirokane / Kawabe Naoya Architects Design Office © Akinobu Kawabe LUZ shirokane / Kawabe Naoya Architects Design Office © Akinobu Kawabe LUZ shirokane / Kawabe Naoya Architects Design Office © Akinobu Kawabe LUZ shirokane / Kawabe Naoya Architects Design Office © Akinobu Kawabe LUZ shirokane / Kawabe Naoya Architects Design Office © Akinobu Kawabe LUZ shirokane / Kawabe Naoya Architects Design Office © Akinobu Kawabe LUZ shirokane / Kawabe Naoya Architects Design Office © Akinobu Kawabe LUZ shirokane / Kawabe Naoya Architects Design Office © Akinobu Kawabe LUZ shirokane / Kawabe Naoya Architects Design Office © Akinobu Kawabe LUZ shirokane / Kawabe Naoya Architects Design Office © Akinobu Kawabe LUZ shirokane / Kawabe Naoya Architects Design Office © Akinobu Kawabe LUZ shirokane / Kawabe Naoya Architects Design Office © Akinobu Kawabe LUZ shirokane / Kawabe Naoya Architects Design Office © Akinobu Kawabe LUZ shirokane / Kawabe Naoya Architects Design Office © Akinobu Kawabe LUZ shirokane / Kawabe Naoya Architects Design Office © Akinobu Kawabe LUZ shirokane / Kawabe Naoya Architects Design Office First Floor Plan LUZ shirokane / Kawabe Naoya Architects Design Office Second Floor Plan LUZ shirokane / Kawabe Naoya Architects Design Office Third Floor Plan LUZ shirokane / Kawabe Naoya Architects Design Office Fourth Floor Plan LUZ shirokane / Kawabe Naoya Architects Design Office Fifth Floor Plan LUZ shirokane / Kawabe Naoya Architects Design Office Section
11 Aug 00:00

FOO / APOLLO Architects & Associates

by AD Editorial Team

Architects: APOLLO Architects & Associates
Location: Yokohama, Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan
Architect In Charge: Satoshi Kurosaki
Area: 190.0 sqm
Year: 2007
Photographs: Masao Nishikawa

Structure Engineer: Masaki Structure (Kenta Masaki)
Facility Engineer: Shimada Architects (Zenei Shimada)
Construction: JP home

From the architect. The site is located in a residential area on a plateau in Yokohama-city. The characteristic façade is designed with exposed concrete and wooden lattices of Serangan batu wood, taking the horizon into consideration. It is a classic of modern design that is conscious of harmony with the surrounding greens and peaceful townscape. This two-family house successfully creates a dignity and formality that are unique to the residence.

The husband who likes playing golf and the wife who loves gardening desired a garden, which can be seen from the central living room on the first floor, as the center of the house. They also desired a continuation between East and West, and assurance of privacy. The solid teak wood on the ceilings and floors, and the hard expression of the high-strength concrete create a contrast. They provide a sense of unity to the space, along with the natural walnut house fixtures, oak table and chairs.

The space for family of the son, who likes surfing, is placed on the second floor that is connected through the open ceiling, in order to facilitate spontaneous communication between the families. In contrast to the closed exterior appearance, the interior is all airy. Even the dining kitchen at the back of the first floor is well lit by characteristic lights from the high side window in the open ceiling.

The roof balcony is accessible from the second floor bedroom and the children’s room through the opening. The roof terrace with deck-flooring behind the outdoor stairs is a common oasis for the two families, where the surrounding town can be viewed. By tactfully using the wooden lattices and plantings, a perfect sense of distance and privacy are created between the building and the street, while enabling the enjoyment of the appropriate openness. It functions as a well-balanced urban house.

FOO / APOLLO Architects & Associates © Masao Nishikawa FOO / APOLLO Architects & Associates © Masao Nishikawa FOO / APOLLO Architects & Associates © Masao Nishikawa FOO / APOLLO Architects & Associates © Masao Nishikawa FOO / APOLLO Architects & Associates © Masao Nishikawa FOO / APOLLO Architects & Associates © Masao Nishikawa FOO / APOLLO Architects & Associates © Masao Nishikawa FOO / APOLLO Architects & Associates © Masao Nishikawa FOO / APOLLO Architects & Associates © Masao Nishikawa FOO / APOLLO Architects & Associates © Masao Nishikawa FOO / APOLLO Architects & Associates © Masao Nishikawa FOO / APOLLO Architects & Associates © Masao Nishikawa FOO / APOLLO Architects & Associates © Masao Nishikawa FOO / APOLLO Architects & Associates © Masao Nishikawa FOO / APOLLO Architects & Associates © Masao Nishikawa FOO / APOLLO Architects & Associates First Floor Plan FOO / APOLLO Architects & Associates Second Floor Plan FOO / APOLLO Architects & Associates Roof Plan FOO / APOLLO Architects & Associates North Elevation FOO / APOLLO Architects & Associates South Elevation FOO / APOLLO Architects & Associates East Elevation FOO / APOLLO Architects & Associates West Elevation FOO / APOLLO Architects & Associates Section 1 FOO / APOLLO Architects & Associates Section 2
10 Aug 04:07

Photo

Julianamarques

um mantra





05 Aug 19:11

Breathtaking Interpretation of the Traditional Californian Ranch House and Farm Tower

by Ada Teicu

Low Rise House by Spiegel Aihara Workshop Breathtaking Interpretation of the Traditional Californian Ranch House and Farm Tower

This astounding home located on a half acre lot in Silicon Valley was imagined as a re-interpretation of traditional shapes corrupted by the need to live a comfortable, low maintenance lifestyle in privacy and alongside family and friends. Designed by architects Spiegel Aihara Workshop, the home known as Low/Rise House uses the principles of traditional Californian ranch house and farm tower to create a high life through modern design. Natural ventilation and solar energy use are two of the home’s eco-traits – they mirror the use of volumes, textures and transparency for comfort and connection.

Low Rise House by Spiegel Aihara Workshop 1 Breathtaking Interpretation of the Traditional Californian Ranch House and Farm Tower

The traditional Californian ranch house and farm tower become a contemporary shelter and socialization spot immersed into the site via environmentally-friendly choices. Photographed by Bruce Damonte, the 4.500 square feet in Menlo Park, California, is home for two professors with grown children who needed their home to “accommodate varying use patterns, creating an intimate environment for their own use as a couple, yet allowing for a spacious and integrated configuration for ten or more family members, and several hundred party guests. This complex programmatic request inspires the specific massing and siting of the building.”

Low Rise House by Spiegel Aihara Workshop 2 Breathtaking Interpretation of the Traditional Californian Ranch House and Farm Tower

With a poetic ambiance radiating through, the Low/Rise House boasts a first floor shaped by “two long and narrow structures that intersect in an open kitchen, providing distinct programmatic areas and settling into the tree-lined landscape, allowing yards to surround and permeate each room. Subtle rotations of the geometry assist in way-finding, as well as identification of the more public and more private functions. The private master suite opens into a fern garden in the eastern corner of the site, while large sliding glass doors suspend the living room within the landscape for family gatherings or larger events. A compact and vertical guest tower is sited at the western corner of the lot amongst tall evergreens, allowing for a more private guest experience, more compact floor plan, and the ability to effectively shut off (socially and energy-wise) the guest spaces zone by zone during typical daily use. Atop the 30-foot tower, a roof deck emerges through the trees, providing a unique vantage point of the structure below and the surrounding townscape.”

Brilliant dream home integrating a new type of suburban living, merging urban and rural, don’t you think so?

Low Rise House by Spiegel Aihara Workshop 3 Breathtaking Interpretation of the Traditional Californian Ranch House and Farm Tower Low Rise House by Spiegel Aihara Workshop 4 Breathtaking Interpretation of the Traditional Californian Ranch House and Farm Tower Low Rise House by Spiegel Aihara Workshop 5 Breathtaking Interpretation of the Traditional Californian Ranch House and Farm Tower Low Rise House by Spiegel Aihara Workshop 6 Breathtaking Interpretation of the Traditional Californian Ranch House and Farm Tower Low Rise House by Spiegel Aihara Workshop 7 Breathtaking Interpretation of the Traditional Californian Ranch House and Farm Tower Low Rise House by Spiegel Aihara Workshop 8 Breathtaking Interpretation of the Traditional Californian Ranch House and Farm Tower Low Rise House by Spiegel Aihara Workshop 9 Breathtaking Interpretation of the Traditional Californian Ranch House and Farm Tower Low Rise House by Spiegel Aihara Workshop 10 Breathtaking Interpretation of the Traditional Californian Ranch House and Farm Tower Low Rise House by Spiegel Aihara Workshop 11 Breathtaking Interpretation of the Traditional Californian Ranch House and Farm Tower Low Rise House by Spiegel Aihara Workshop 12 Breathtaking Interpretation of the Traditional Californian Ranch House and Farm Tower Low Rise House by Spiegel Aihara Workshop 13 Breathtaking Interpretation of the Traditional Californian Ranch House and Farm Tower Low Rise House by Spiegel Aihara Workshop 14 Breathtaking Interpretation of the Traditional Californian Ranch House and Farm Tower Low Rise House by Spiegel Aihara Workshop 15 Breathtaking Interpretation of the Traditional Californian Ranch House and Farm Tower Low Rise House by Spiegel Aihara Workshop 16 Breathtaking Interpretation of the Traditional Californian Ranch House and Farm Tower Low Rise House by Spiegel Aihara Workshop 17 Breathtaking Interpretation of the Traditional Californian Ranch House and Farm Tower Low Rise House by Spiegel Aihara Workshop 18 Breathtaking Interpretation of the Traditional Californian Ranch House and Farm Tower Low Rise House by Spiegel Aihara Workshop 19 Breathtaking Interpretation of the Traditional Californian Ranch House and Farm Tower Low Rise House by Spiegel Aihara Workshop 20 Breathtaking Interpretation of the Traditional Californian Ranch House and Farm Tower Low Rise House by Spiegel Aihara Workshop 21 Breathtaking Interpretation of the Traditional Californian Ranch House and Farm Tower Low Rise House by Spiegel Aihara Workshop 22 Breathtaking Interpretation of the Traditional Californian Ranch House and Farm Tower Low Rise House by Spiegel Aihara Workshop 23 Breathtaking Interpretation of the Traditional Californian Ranch House and Farm Tower Low Rise House by Spiegel Aihara Workshop 24 Breathtaking Interpretation of the Traditional Californian Ranch House and Farm Tower

The post Breathtaking Interpretation of the Traditional Californian Ranch House and Farm Tower appeared first on Freshome.com.

05 Aug 20:58

Woman Uses Nike Run-Tracking App To Run In Penises

run-drawing-1.jpg Claire Wyckoff (pretty please be pronounced wackoff) uses the Nike+ run-tracking app to run in penis shapes, which she then posts to her Tumblr 'Running Drawing'. She doesn't JUST do penises though, just a LOT of penises (she's also done a unicorn, middle finger, Slimer from Ghostbusters, and a space invader). Clearly, Claire knows how to make cardio fun. Because if there was a giant penis waiting at the finish line every time I went for a run I'd be a lot more inclined to exercise. Wait, that came out wrong. I meant a giant vagina. No, that's not quite right either. I'll settle for a hotdog and a beer. Keep going for more of Claire's exercise art.
05 Aug 04:00

Dasgupta Saucier Residence by The Raleigh Architecture Co.

by Erin
Julianamarques

olha Lori um revestimento tipo enferrujado

The Raleigh Architecture Co. have recently completed the Dasgupta Saucier Residence in
North Carolina.

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Project description

The Dasgupta-Saucier residence is situated on a narrow downtown infill lot in a Raleigh, NC. Facing a busy thoroughfare, the house uses natural topography and carefully placed openings to alleviate sound and establish privacy. The residence pays homage to its southern roots by creating deep recessed front and rear porches with a cantilevered upper story. An open central volume provides abundant natural daylight to the lower story while a steel staircase twists upwards, unifying all of the spaces of the house together. Warm cypress siding roots the residence into the landscape and weathered steel panels protect the private upper story.

A second floor level of private bedrooms is stacked on an open lower level of living areas. The second floor “bar” is split, pushing the children’s bedrooms north and a master suite south. This simple shift creates a covered front and rear porch while simultaneously providing a double height kitchen space in the center for a new family passionate about the culture of cooking. A wrapping steel staircase leads upwards to a working office for each of the clients, while a private terrace on the third floor links the house to its landscape and provides views to downtown. The residence and a neighboring home share a landscaped courtyard that is shielded from the busy street, providing a space for both families to gather.

Roof: Standing seam galvanized metal & TPO roofing. Siding: Cor-ten steel panels w/ 100% recycled content, clear finish cypress (locally sourced). Systems: Geothermal & mini-split HVAC system, instant hot water heater w/ recirculation loop. Windows: Aluminum clad wood windows.

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Architect: The Raleigh Architecture Co.
General Contractor: The Raleigh Construction Co.
Photography by Raymond Goodman

02 Aug 17:40

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02 Aug 20:00

AD Classics: Thorncrown Chapel / E Fay Jones

by Andrew Galloway

Hidden in the middle of the forests surrounding Arkansas’ Ozark Mountains, Thorncrown Chapel rests amongst the oaks, pines and maples. The humble chapel, designed by Euine Fay Jones, is less than 35 years old – yet it’s on the U.S. Historic register, has been named one of the AIA’s top ten buildings of the 20th century, and has even been called the best American building since 1980.

In the late 1970’s retired schoolteacher Jim Reed purchased the property where Thorncrown chapel would be located – originally as a space for his retirement cabin. But, after seeing tourists stop along the highway to view the beauty of the area, his vision changed. He imagined a non-denominational chapel, a spiritual place — one that Jones would later describe as a “place to think your best thoughts.” Perhaps its simplicity is what draws over 2000 daily visitors –it is architecture that everyone, not just architects, can understand and appreciate.

The remarkable glass and wooden structure was dreamt up by E Fay Jones while he was both practicing in Little Rock and working as Dean at the University of Arkansas School of Architecture in 1978.

With over 425 glass windows and a repeated column and truss structure, the vertical chapel is like a “forest within a forest,” reaching 48 feet high, 60 feet long and a mere 24 feet wide. A central skylight allows generous portions of light to spill through onto those below. Custom lanterns adorn each column and at night reflect off the glass – as if they were lit somewhere off in the forest.

For Jones, the process of construction was just as important as the final object. His practice was unique in that he employed not only young architects, but craftsmen, such as stonemasons and carpenters, whose influence is evident in the Chapel. Every truss was made of local pine – “no larger than what two men could carry through the woods.” 2×4’s, 2×6’s and 2×12’s were assembled on site and subsequently erected, leaving minimal site impact. In fact, the only visible steel in the project is the diamond-shaped patterns centered in each truss.

Born in the small town of Pine Bluff, Arkansas in 1921, Jones never had the desire to become as famous as his close friend and influence Frank Lloyd Wright. Indeed, perhaps the words at the entrance of Thorncrown Chapel encapsulate E Fay Jones and his humble architecture best: Please Come In And Sit Awhile, Just As You Are.

Sources

“AIArchitect, December 19, 2005 – Thorncrown Chapel Wins AIA 2006 Twenty-five Year Award.” AIA.org. Web. 29 Jul. 2014.

“The Architecture of Thorncrown Chapel.” Thorncrown Chapel. Web. 01 Aug. 2014.

“Fay Jones Collection, University of Arkansas Libraries.” Fay Jones Collection, University of Arkansas Libraries. Web. 29 Jul. 2014.

“Special Collections.” Manuscript Collection 1373 | University of Arkansas Libraries. Web. 29 Jul. 2014.

Architects: E. Fay Jones
Location: 12968 U.S. 62
Architect In Charge: E. Fay Jones
Area: 1440.0 ft2
Year: 1980
Photographs: Flickr User Anirban Ray, Flickr User Nathan Hughes Hamilton, Flickr User Steve Snodgrass, Flickr User nwlynch, Flickr User Brenda Fike, Flickr User Brad Holt, Flickr User Clinton Steeds, Flickr User Josh Bozarth

AD Classics: Thorncrown Chapel / E Fay Jones © Flickr User Anirban Ray AD Classics: Thorncrown Chapel / E Fay Jones © Flickr User Nathan Hughes Hamilton AD Classics: Thorncrown Chapel / E Fay Jones © Flickr User Steve Snodgrass AD Classics: Thorncrown Chapel / E Fay Jones © Flickr User nwlynch AD Classics: Thorncrown Chapel / E Fay Jones © Flickr User Brenda Fike AD Classics: Thorncrown Chapel / E Fay Jones © Flickr User Brad Holt AD Classics: Thorncrown Chapel / E Fay Jones © Flickr User Clinton Steeds AD Classics: Thorncrown Chapel / E Fay Jones © Flickr User Josh Bozarth AD Classics: Thorncrown Chapel / E Fay Jones © Flickr User Josh Bozarth
31 Jul 17:00

A Modern Beach House at the Jersey Shore

by Caroline Williamson

A Modern Beach House at the Jersey Shore

Located on the Jersey Shore in Strathmere, New Jersey, this beach house, dubbed Love Shack, brings forth a mixture of casual beach-y and minimal modern resulting in the perfect summer getaway for a family.

A Modern Beach House at the Jersey Shore in main architecture Category

The house, designed by Ambit Architecture, is situated on a barrier island, affording views of both the ocean and the bay from the top floor.

A Modern Beach House at the Jersey Shore in main architecture Category

The scaled back interior does nothing to obstruct the floor-to-ceiling views.

A Modern Beach House at the Jersey Shore in main architecture Category

They flipped the layout from the typical one and put the living room, dining room, and kitchen on the top floor so the views can be utilized in the areas where the most time is spent.

A Modern Beach House at the Jersey Shore in main architecture Category

The kitchen area may be small but the design is incredible. I love the zig zagged wood panel that separates the kitchen. I also like how they built the kitchen around that window so plenty of light floods into the middle part of the house.

A Modern Beach House at the Jersey Shore in main architecture Category

On this side, you can sit back and enjoy a meal with that incredible view.

A Modern Beach House at the Jersey Shore in main architecture Category

On the beach side, there’s another seating area to kick back in.

A Modern Beach House at the Jersey Shore in main architecture Category

There are four bedrooms and two bathrooms that round out the design.

A Modern Beach House at the Jersey Shore in main architecture Category

The house is clad in a white cedar and painted cement board panels that both age beautifully and look natural.

A Modern Beach House at the Jersey Shore in main architecture Category

A Modern Beach House at the Jersey Shore in main architecture Category

A Modern Beach House at the Jersey Shore in main architecture Category

A Modern Beach House at the Jersey Shore in main architecture Category








31 Jul 01:01

mimimi da copa

by Patricia C.
Julianamarques

acho que foi o único texto sobre a copa que li, mas achei bem legal.

Demorei para postar, pois precisava antes escrever sobre a copa e tudo que ela movimentou em mim.

Gosto de acreditar que na teoria dos universos paralelos, em algum deles, o Brasil conseguiu ganhar em casa. Serei bem sincera. O fator humilhação, para mim, é o de menos. Foi sim a maior humilhação em copas, mas esse não é o meu ponto. O ponto é o fantasma precisando ser exorcizado desde 50. Há gente que não quer outra copa nunca mais no Brasil. Eu quero 100. Até fazer esse fantasma subir e ir embora das nossas vidas. Galvão disse no tetra em 94 que o Brasil estava exorcizando o último fantasma que restava, a cobrança dos pênaltis. Eu discordo. O último fantasma é ganhar em casa. E mais uma vez não conseguimos. Há quem procure culpados, está cheio de textos por aí, não defendo e não condeno nenhum dos nomes citados. Minha única defesa vai pro Barbosa, que merecia esse título mais do que qualquer um de nós. Gosto de pensar que, em outro universo, ele foi feliz conquistando o primeiro campeonato em 50, jamais tendo escutado a palavra Maracanazo e, quiçá, com outro termo inventado El Maracanón donde solamente gana cabrón de Brasil.

As pessoas não fazem ideia, né? Do que era aquele momento para o Brasil. Li resenhas aos montes dizendo como o 7x1 foi pior. E apenas o meu minuto de silêncio para quem, além de desconhecer a história do futebol, desconhece a história do Brasil. A primeira efervescência do orgulho negro está intimamente ligada a dois fatores: o candomblé e o samba. O percurso foi longo até conseguirem o respeito da elite branca, até, por exemplo, Heitor Villa-Lobos chamar o quarteto de ouro - Cartola, Donga, João da Baiana e Pixinguinha - para cantar para outro maestro famoso que agora não sei o nome. Era não só a elite branca olhando para o negro pela primeira vez sem desdém, como também era para o negro uma afirmação da sua importância. O Brasil e principalmente o Rio de Janeiro borbulhavam em 50 numa expectativa de ser a nova França/Paris. A confiança naquele time era absurda. E veio o revés, 2 x 1 Uruguai e o nosso bode expiatório foi o goleiro Barbosa. Uma horrível teoria antiga voltou com toda força, a de que estávamos fadados ao fracasso por causa da miscigenação. Barbosa e Bigode, o responsável pela marcação do Varela, eram negros. De onze pessoas em campo, caiu sobre eles a responsabilidade da vergonha nacional.

Nelson Rodrigues, 8 anos mais tarde, escreveu a crônica "Complexo de vira latas". Foi escrita às vésperas do início da copa na Suécia e falava sobre a falta de motivação das pessoas com frases naipe "Brasil nem se classifica" etc. Era um sentimento de pessimismo em relação à seleção que viria se consagrar campeã pela primeira vez. E o Nelson vai discorrendo sobre como esse é um problema iniciado na derrota de 50. Como as pessoas acreditavam muito naquele título, não poderiam sofrer novamente, então o pessimismo acabava sendo uma válvula de escape. Não passava na cabeça do Nelson que ali ele tinha definido o estereótipo do brasileiro. "Somos uma merda, o estrangeiro é sempre melhor". Esse sentimento sintetizado no tumblr só no brazil. Iguais essas comparações que a gente vê hoje no facebook, Ronaldo Nazario (calado é um poeta - parte II) dizendo que a Alemanha tem 100 Nobel e o Brasil nenhum e essa é a verdadeira goleada. É um acinte, né? Esquece da nossa colonização durante 300 anos. Esquece todos os pormenores. É a mesma coisa se fizermos uma comparação entre ganhadores homens e mulheres ou ganhadores brancos e negros e daí tirarmos equivocadamente que a mulher e o negro são inferiores. Falta olhar para o fundo da nossa história. A maioria das pessoas só olha a nossa superfície. A copa de 50 foi muito pior porque definiu a identidade nacional. O vira lata complexado. Ninguém ergueu a cabeça depois dos 7x1, porque ninguém recuperou o orgulho depois de 50, nem com o título em 58, nem com as outras copas, nem sendo o maior campeão. Veja bem. Ainda estamos no topo e nos comportamos como ralé.

Aqui entra outra reflexão. Quando o futebol sai da elite e passa a ser de massa, ele traz a crítica imbecil da alienação do povo. O futebol passa a ser o principal responsável de todas as nossas mazelas. Chamam o povo de alienado, de massa de manobra. Tudo isso por causa do futebol (e do carnaval também, mas isso é papo pra outro post). Como se o futebol tivesse todo esse imenso poder, como se a alienação não fosse fruto da falta de incentivo ao pensamento plural. E quem trata a população dessa forma não percebe (ou será que percebe?) o quanto esse discurso é preconceituoso. Tachar o povo de ignorante e sem condições de pensar tem outro nome senão o preconceito? Quem desmerece o esporte, lhe tira a visão de cultura. Tira o mérito, não consegue enxergar.

Por isso as coisas para mim são mais amplas. Não me atenho aos vilões ou heróis, a esquemas táticos ou confederações corruptas. Vai me interessar sempre o sentimento, a marcação da identidade nacional. Somos o país com mais títulos e ainda sim cornetamos a nossa seleção há anos. Faz parte da nossa identidade. Nunca temos o melhor time, sempre temos perna de pau. Cornetamos não apenas na derrota, mas antes dela e até mesmo na vitória. A tristeza que fica nessa copa não é a humilhação dos 7x1, mas a oportunidade perdida para vingarmos Barbosa. A oportunidade perdida para curarmos essa ferida que nos foi herdada. A ferida de quem não conseguiu ganhar em casa.
21 Jul 00:00

Terrace-House in El Limón / Villar Watty Arquitectos

by AD Editorial Team

Architects: Villar Watty Arquitectos
Location: Jalisco, Mexico
Project Architects: Gerardo Villar Watty y Alberto Villar Watty
Design Team: Daniel Villanueva, Paola García
Project Area: 263 sqm
Project Year: 2012
Photographs: Diego Serratos

Structures: TADE diseño estructural
Construction: Enrique Sahagún

From the architect. The “El Limón” development is located in the Lake Chapala area, famous for having one of the best climates in the world, with mountain scenery and a close relationship with the lake.

In a plot of 962 m2 with a significant slope and a clear visual axis (mountain-lake), the terrace-house arises from the need for a weekend residence that will eventually become permanent for a retired couple who can entertain, and for which an outdoor space as a terrace was required.

The house is placed on the highest part of the land, where there is the best view of the lake, and it is designed on a single level, respecting the maximum allowable height in the area.

The distribution of the house arises from the idea of using service spaces to delimit living spaces and orient them towards the view of the lake, so that the house can be used as a large open space that integrates the terrace with the pool, living room, dining room and kitchen into a single room, all the while maintaining the privacy of the bedroom area.

The base and the bush-hammered oxidized concrete roof in combination with the wooden prisms, support the directionality of the space.

Casa -Terraza en El Limón / Villar Watty Arquitectos © Diego Serratos Casa -Terraza en El Limón / Villar Watty Arquitectos © Diego Serratos Casa -Terraza en El Limón / Villar Watty Arquitectos © Diego Serratos Casa -Terraza en El Limón / Villar Watty Arquitectos © Diego Serratos Casa -Terraza en El Limón / Villar Watty Arquitectos © Diego Serratos Casa -Terraza en El Limón / Villar Watty Arquitectos © Diego Serratos Casa -Terraza en El Limón / Villar Watty Arquitectos © Diego Serratos Casa -Terraza en El Limón / Villar Watty Arquitectos © Diego Serratos Casa -Terraza en El Limón / Villar Watty Arquitectos © Diego Serratos Casa -Terraza en El Limón / Villar Watty Arquitectos © Diego Serratos Casa -Terraza en El Limón / Villar Watty Arquitectos © Diego Serratos Casa -Terraza en El Limón / Villar Watty Arquitectos © Diego Serratos Casa -Terraza en El Limón / Villar Watty Arquitectos © Diego Serratos Casa -Terraza en El Limón / Villar Watty Arquitectos © Diego Serratos Casa -Terraza en El Limón / Villar Watty Arquitectos © Diego Serratos Casa -Terraza en El Limón / Villar Watty Arquitectos © Diego Serratos Casa -Terraza en El Limón / Villar Watty Arquitectos Plan Casa -Terraza en El Limón / Villar Watty Arquitectos Elevation Casa -Terraza en El Limón / Villar Watty Arquitectos Section Casa -Terraza en El Limón / Villar Watty Arquitectos Elevation Casa -Terraza en El Limón / Villar Watty Arquitectos Elevation Casa -Terraza en El Limón / Villar Watty Arquitectos Scheme
20 Jul 16:00

House of the Infinite

by Camille

L’architecte Alberto Campo Baeza vient de rénover cette ancienne usine de pêche à Cádiz pour en faire une incroyable résidence. La piscine placée sur le toit de la maison offre une vue imprenable sur l’océan. L’architecte a créé un contraste harmonieux avec l’architecture moderne et contemporaine face à la nature.

House of the Infinite by Alberto Campo Baeza 1 House of the Infinite by Alberto Campo Baeza 8 House of the Infinite by Alberto Campo Baeza 7 House of the Infinite by Alberto Campo Baeza 6 House of the Infinite by Alberto Campo Baeza 5 House of the Infinite by Alberto Campo Baeza 4 House of the Infinite by Alberto Campo Baeza 3 House of the Infinite by Alberto Campo Baeza 2
18 Jul 03:17

joaquin phoenix’s forehead



joaquin phoenix’s forehead

14 Jul 01:29

bye losers!



bye losers!

11 Jul 21:30

Chile Vacation Home Uses Angled Support Columns to Add to Aesthetics and Preserve the Views

by Evelyn M
Julianamarques

nossa que projeto lindo

angled-support-columns-create-vs-vacation-home-1-exterior.jpg

Rambla House is a weekend home located in Zapallar, Valparaiso Region, along the central coast of Chile about 175km from Santiago. The site is exposed to strong south winds and intense sun from the west and LAND Arquitectos designed Rambla House to be protected from the winds and sun while at the same time focusing on the panoramic ocean views and an indoor-outdoor lifestyle.

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The home is built over concrete beams that provide ventilation for the structure to prevent the coastal humidity to transfer into the interior zones.

angled-support-columns-create-vs-vacation-home-3-exterior.jpg

Pine wood volumes are built over top of the concrete beams and the Pine has all been treated with a white protective coating that also helps deflect heat from the intense summer sun.

angled-support-columns-create-vs-vacation-home-4-exterior.jpg

A concrete block wall protects the structure from the steep slope behind.

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The concrete blocks have large central voids that allow light to pass through, creating a geometric shadow play in the process.

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The wall is tied into the home at the roof level.

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Steel V formation posts are used throughout Rambla House as the main structural detail.

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The terrace stretches out towards the ocean and features a deck level pool as well as bench seating on its perimeter.

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There is also an onsite trampoline next to the house as well as an ocean front public promenade below the house that leads to the city center.

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The social zone of Rambla House is within its own glass wrapped volume.

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The repeating element of the V supports creates a dynamic element within the neutral interior that is only rivaled by the ocean beyond.

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The living room furnishings have an outdoor aesthetic perfectly in tune with the amazing views through the walls of glazings.

angled-support-columns-create-vs-vacation-home-13-dining.jpg

the dining room also plays up the outdoor experience with its bench seating - and when the glazings are slid and stacked out of the way, it really is as though the social zone is outside.

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The V supports on both the inside and the outside adds to the blurring of the two zones.

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While there is a small kitchen behind the dining room, the piece de resistance is the large outdoor BBQ area next to the social zone; it features its own ceiling void for easy venting of cooking smoke while flooding the space with natural light at the same time.

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When the glazings are slid and stacked, the BBQ area is just a few uninterrupted feet away from the dining room.

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On the other side of the BBQ area is a 2nd volume that houses both the bedroom and the bathroom.

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LAND Arquitectos
Photography by Sergio Pirrone

08 Jul 13:00

The Abyss Table by Christopher Duffy for Duffy London

by Caroline Williamson

The Abyss Table by Christopher Duffy for Duffy London

The visuals on The Abyss Table are more than enough to make your jaw drop, which is no surprise given Duffy London’s history for clever, unforgettable designs. This time, Christopher Duffy is taking you straight to the depths of the ocean with a dramatic coffee table that will never cease being a conversation piece.

The Abyss Table by Christopher Duffy for Duffy London in main home furnishings Category

Pairing layers of wood and glass, the table becomes a geological cross section of the ocean, showing various depths.

The Abyss Table by Christopher Duffy for Duffy London in main home furnishings Category

After a trip to the glass factory and seeing how thick glass darkened the more layers added, much like the way the sea does as the ocean floor becomes deeper, Duffy used this effect to show a piece of the ocean’s bed. The team spent a year experimenting with sculpted glass, Perspex, and wood to achieve the three-dimensional model of a geological map with the final result being a mesmerizing, abyss-like, sculptural table.

The Abyss Table by Christopher Duffy for Duffy London in main home furnishings Category

The Abyss Table is made by hand upon order and is limited to an edition of 25. Each piece is made from sustainable materials.

The Abyss Table by Christopher Duffy for Duffy London in main home furnishings Category

The Abyss Table by Christopher Duffy for Duffy London in main home furnishings Category

The Abyss Table by Christopher Duffy for Duffy London in main home furnishings Category

The Abyss Table by Christopher Duffy for Duffy London in main home furnishings Category

Photos by Duffy London.








26 Jun 15:45

O que é, afinal, fazer coisas “como uma menina”?

by Jacqueline Lafloufa

O mais recente vídeo da P&G em uma campanha para a marca de absorventes Always faz uma interessante reflexão sobre o que seria fazer coisas ‘como uma menina’.

Em uma audição, convidou garotos e garotas mais velhas a encenar situações que eram descritas assim: correr como uma menina, lutar como uma menina, jogar uma bola como uma menina.

Os resultados eram caricaturas de comportamentos, que quando interpretadas por meninos ficavam ainda mais estereotipadas.

Mas o legal mesmo é ver o que acontece depois, quando meninas mais novas são convidadas a interpretar as mesmas descrições de cenas. Ao mostrar o que era correr como uma menina, elas não se fizeram de rogadas e deram o melhor de si, seja correndo no lugar ou saindo pelo set de filmagem. O mesmo aconteceu com todos os outros pedidos, que foram feitos com garra e com vontade. Questionada sobre o que significava ‘correr como uma menina’, a garotinha de vestido rosa esclareceu: “correr o mais rápido que eu puder”.

Para a P&G, esse conceito negativo da comparação como uma menina só se torna um insulto no início da adolescência, entre os 10 e 12 anos, depois que garotas e garotos já se cansaram de ouvir que atividades que não são feitas com uma determinada ‘qualidade’ são coisa de menina.

O intuito da marca, através da campanha Always #likeagirl é mostrar que isso pode significar coisas incríveis, se deixarmos de usar essa expressão como uma forma de humilhar ou diminuir alguém.

No último trecho, a P&G incentiva os mais velhos que participaram da audição a refletirem sobre a atuação que fizeram, e pede que, dessa vez, mostrem como seria ‘rebater como uma menina’ sem pensar em estereótipos. O resultado é completamente diferente do inicial.

Uma bonita campanha de empoderamento feminino.

A criação é da Leo Burnett de Chicago, Toronto e Londres.

Brainstorm9Post originalmente publicado no Brainstorm #9
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26 Jun 13:28

Making the Leap

by Grant
22 May 20:30

Photo

Julianamarques

minha vida nesse momento





27 May 18:58

Wet Dog: Quirky Portraits of Dogs Captured Mid-Bath by Sophie Gamand

by Christopher Jobson

Wet Dog: Quirky Portraits of Dogs Captured Mid Bath by Sophie Gamand portraits humor dogs

Wet Dog: Quirky Portraits of Dogs Captured Mid Bath by Sophie Gamand portraits humor dogs

Wet Dog: Quirky Portraits of Dogs Captured Mid Bath by Sophie Gamand portraits humor dogs

Wet Dog: Quirky Portraits of Dogs Captured Mid Bath by Sophie Gamand portraits humor dogs

Wet Dog: Quirky Portraits of Dogs Captured Mid Bath by Sophie Gamand portraits humor dogs

Wet Dog: Quirky Portraits of Dogs Captured Mid Bath by Sophie Gamand portraits humor dogs

Wet Dog: Quirky Portraits of Dogs Captured Mid Bath by Sophie Gamand portraits humor dogs

Wet Dog: Quirky Portraits of Dogs Captured Mid Bath by Sophie Gamand portraits humor dogs

New York photographer Sophie Gamand has spent the last four years photographing dogs as part of a larger project to better understand humans. Her latest series, Wet Dog, captures hilarious and awkward photos of small dogs as they are bathed with the help of professional groomer Ruben Santana in the Bronx. Fascinated by the domestication of dogs as one of the first forms of artificial selection, Gamand explores the differences and similarities in animals and humans, making the the distinction that dogs ceased being “animals” long ago as they acquired human attributes and became pets.

The Wet Dog series won first place in the Portraiture category of the 2014 Sony World Photography Awards, and the photos you see here will be included in a book to be published by Grand Central Publishing in the fall of 2015. Prints are available here, and you can also follow Gamand on Instagram. All images courtesy the photographer. (via Feature Shoot)

24 Apr 00:57

This Hamster is Stuffing His Face with Baby Carrots Like He’s Going Through a Breakup..

by Georgie
Julianamarques

um bom uso pra meme amo/sou

We’ve all been there: Someone breaks your heart and you head straight for the Mac n’ Cheese and ice cream.  But I don’t think any of us have “been there” like this hamster…
 

Damn.  This hamster eatin’ those carrots like he just found out Taylor Swift left him for King Joffrey, post-mortem.

 

“Does this carrot make me look fat?”  Yes.  Yes, it does.  And I love you.

The post This Hamster is Stuffing His Face with Baby Carrots Like He’s Going Through a Breakup.. appeared first on POPHANGOVER.

13 Apr 03:09

ryancrobert: fucking show-off



ryancrobert:

fucking show-off

11 Apr 21:30

Boy Builds Lil Excavator With Plastic Syringe Hydraulics

homemade-excavator-model.gif This is a video of a Brazilian boy who built himself a little model excavator using plastic syringe hydraulics. Most impressive. I'd pretend I could have made something like that growing up, but I'd be lying. The only thing I was making at his age were messes in my pants. "He's like twelve!" Damn, I thought he was sixteen. Keep going for so much air scooping it's sick.
17 Mar 19:00

Shapes in Nature

by Camille

Ce magnifique projet personnel par Chaotic Atmospheres est destiné à expérimenter l’érosion sur différents terrains. Des formes géométriques prennent en effet place au milieu de ces immenses terrains naturels. Une série de photographies originales à découvrir de manière complète dans la suite de l’article.

Shapes in Nature 0 Shapes in Nature 5 Shapes in Nature 4 Shapes in Nature 3 Shapes in Nature 7 Shapes in Nature 6
11 Jan 14:50

Versatile and Alluring: Odu Rocker and Daybed by Confused Direction

by Lavinia
Julianamarques

é uma rede acolchoada, acho que eu gostaria

design odu daybed Versatile and Alluring: Odu Rocker and Daybed by Confused DirectionA functional mix between a bed and a rocking chair, the Odu Rocker envisioned by Flo Florian and Sascha Akkermann from Confused-Direction is eye-catching and original. Initially spotted by Freshome on Trendir, the swaying daybed features a a curvacious shell like base, complete with a comfy-textured finishing material, that makes the overall design quite inviting. An interesting feature is that by adjusting his or her position, the user can automatically shift the gravitational center of the rocker, transforming it from an armchair into a daybed and vice versa.
design rocker daybed odu rosconi 2 Versatile and Alluring: Odu Rocker and Daybed by Confused DirectionThe name “Odu”  is Hungarian for “cavern” which the designers stated it is a hint towards it generous size. As for the technical details, the producers unveiled that the large outer shell is made of fiber laminate and epoxy resin, while the inner core is upholstered in soft, skin friendly micro fiber available in 20 different colors. This makes the item customizable for a variety of modern interiors.
rocker daybed Versatile and Alluring: Odu Rocker and Daybed by Confused Direction rocker daybed odu rosconi chair Versatile and Alluring: Odu Rocker and Daybed by Confused Direction rocker daybed odu rosconi Versatile and Alluring: Odu Rocker and Daybed by Confused Direction    odu daybed 5 Versatile and Alluring: Odu Rocker and Daybed by Confused Direction odu daybed 6 Versatile and Alluring: Odu Rocker and Daybed by Confused Direction odu daybed 7 Versatile and Alluring: Odu Rocker and Daybed by Confused Direction odu daybed 8 Versatile and Alluring: Odu Rocker and Daybed by Confused Direction

You're reading Versatile and Alluring: Odu Rocker and Daybed by Confused Direction originally posted on Freshome.

The post Versatile and Alluring: Odu Rocker and Daybed by Confused Direction appeared first on Freshome.com.

11 Dec 04:41

Fight Sexist Stereotypes With Shampoo

by Stacey Goguen
Julianamarques

feminismo pra vender shampoo, como lidar? (é uma pergunta honesta)

This ad actually does a pretty nice job of summing up in a minute the power and persuasion of some of the current sexist stereotypes floating around our culture.

However, in an expected non-twist (it being a commercial), the video ends with the advice that, in order to avoid these double standards, one should just buy the right shampoo.

I find it extra amusing (and bemusing) that the ad can’t even demonstrate the efficacy of its own advice.  The woman at the very end supposedly has beaten the “show off” stereotype with her shiny hair, but…there’s nothing in the ad showing that to be the case. The word “show off” has miraculously melted from the sidewalk beneath her feet, but the suggestion is still in our heads.  I found myself still easily fitting the woman under the heading of “show off.” The ad created no cognitive dissonance that might allow one to undermine the force of these stereotypes.

So really, this commercial is a great showcase for why individual willpower/gusto/innovation sometimes just can’t beat a cultural stereotype.  It doesn’t matter how great your hair looks. In fact, the better it looks, the more of a show-off you may seem.

I find it fascinating when people can so brilliantly articulate one piece of a puzzle and then immediately fail so hard at framing the adjacent pieces.
(See also: anyone who has moved you to tears with their articulation of one form of oppression to only turn around and spout tone-deaf nonsense about the others.)